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Submission + - Digital Differences in Americans (pewinternet.org)

antdude writes: "Pew Internet article, with its details, showing "Digital Differences" — "When the Pew Internet Project first began writing about the role of the internet in American life in 2000, there were stark differences between those who were using the internet and those who were not. Today, differences in internet access still exist among different demographic groups, especially when it comes to access to high-speed broadband at home. Among the main findings about the state of digital access..."

Seen on Blue's News and TechCrunch."


Submission + - Duke Nukem Week:Game's history of the series, etc. (retrogamingaus.com)

antdude writes: "Retro Gaming Australia (RGA) [original article and has more links] and GamePron (reprinted from RGA with less links) dedicated a week to the Duke Nukem series with seven pages looking at the history of the series. It looks at Duke's humble origins right through to Duke Nukem Forever (DNF), the failed attempts to get Duke onto the silver screen, the cameo appearances in other Apogee/3D Realms products, promotional materials, and much more.

Seen on Blue's News and Game Pron."

Data Storage

Submission + - The Evolution of Removable Storage. (networkworld.com)

Ant writes: "This 21 (not 24) slides NetworkWorld presentation show "the evolution of removable storage" — "Over the years, people have tried to transfer information from one computer to another in a dizzying number of ways. Here's a look at some of the best, along with others that time forgot.

Brave users of history's earliest computers programmed those massive electronic beasts through jumper wires plugged into arrays of sockets. With so few computers in existence (none of them compatible with any others), digital pioneers had little need for portable software: The programs stayed put. Soon, however, companies like IBM began selling multiple identical computers, and users sought a way to program the devices more efficiently, to move programs from computer to computer, and to reload programs later with a minimum of hassle.

Thus begins the history of removable computer storage, which in many ways is the story of software distribution: The first job of removable storage was to share software without requiring any reprogramming from scratch. Over the next few pages, we'll revisit dozens of ways that engineers have solved the problem over the past 60 years..."

Seen on Digg."


Submission + - Roger Ebert: The Essential Man (esquire.com)

antdude writes: Boing Boing shares a seven pages Esquire article (one print page) on Roger Ebert's recent degrading health life, but with strong spirits — "It has been nearly four years since Roger Ebert lost his lower jaw and his ability to speak. Now television's most famous movie critic is rarely seen and never heard, but his words have never stopped..."

Submission + - The Making Of: Syndicate -- A Retrospective (edge-online.com) 1

Ant writes: "This three pages Edge Online article talks about the retrospective/making of one of the classic Bullfrog games, Syndicate:

"... It's over ten years since he led the Syndicate project; more than a decade since Bullfrog's dystopian opus beguiled gamers and critics with its combination of progressive, squad-based shoot 'em up, strategic planning and – for the time – refreshingly freeform environs...

The most adroit explanation of Bullfrog’s success in the early '90s is that its staff genuinely enjoyed themselves, making games that, first and foremost, they wanted to play..."

Seen on Blue's News."

The Internet

Submission + - The History of the Internet in a Nutshell (sixrevisions.com)

antdude writes: Six Revisions shares "The History of the Internet in a Nutshell" starting 1969 — "Here's a brief history of the Internet, including important dates, people, projects, sites, and other information that should give you at least a partial picture of what this thing we call the Internet really is, and where it came from.

While the complete history of the Internet could easily fill a few books, this article should familiarize you with key milestones and events related to the growth and evolution of the Internet between 1969 to 2009..."

Seen on Digg.

Submission + - Milk drinking started around 7,500 years ago ... (eurekalert.org)

Ant writes: "EurekaAlert! reports that "milk drinking started around 7,500 years ago in central Europe. The ability to digest the milk sugar lactose first evolved in dairy farming communities in central Europe, not in more northern groups as was previously thought, finds a new study led by UCL (University College London) scientists published in the journal PLoS Computational Biology.

The genetic change that enabled early Europeans to drink milk without getting sick has been mapped to dairying farmers who lived around 7,500 years ago in a region between the central Balkans and central Europe. Previously, it was thought that natural selection favoured milk drinkers only in more northern regions because of their greater need for vitamin D in their diet. People living in most parts of the world make vitamin D when sunlight hits the skin, but in northern latitudes there isn't enough sunlight to do this for most of the year...

Seen on Neatorama."


Submission + - Eleven (11) Years of Google: A Look Back (pcworld.com)

antdude writes: PC World (five pages; one print page) shares the eleven (11) years of Google's history — "Google has come a long way in its eleven-year history, from its humble beginning as a Stanford University research project in 1998, to the global, multi-billion dollar online presence Google enjoys today..."

Seen on Digg.

If you can't learn to do it well, learn to enjoy doing it badly.