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Submission + - What is the real version number of Windows 8? (ocmodshop.com)

antdude writes: "This seven/7 pages OCModShop article look into the past and the current Windows versions — "Today Microsoft launched its latest version of its iconic Operating System (OS): Windows 8. There have been many version of Windows over the years, and one can't help but wonder what justifies this version number. Microsoft and other technology companies have over-written and re-named their product history before, so we take a good hard look at all the previous operating systems to see if the numbers add up.

Microsoft Windows started as version 1.0 as an add-on to its disk operating system (DOS). The product was a simple graphical user interface (GUI) program that was little more than a visual file manager. Windows 2.0 was released to take advantage of the features offered by Intel’s 286 processor. Windows 3 is the version that really started Microsoft on its current path of success.

All of these versions numbers are very logical and can be easily counted. Where things start to get a little ambiguous is when Windows NT is thrown into the mix..."

Seen on Blue's News."


Submission + - Digital Differences in Americans (pewinternet.org)

antdude writes: "Pew Internet article, with its details, showing "Digital Differences" — "When the Pew Internet Project first began writing about the role of the internet in American life in 2000, there were stark differences between those who were using the internet and those who were not. Today, differences in internet access still exist among different demographic groups, especially when it comes to access to high-speed broadband at home. Among the main findings about the state of digital access..."

Seen on Blue's News and TechCrunch."


Submission + - The Eerie World of Abandoned Computers (pcmag.com)

antdude writes: "Vintage Computing and Gaming shares its twelve/12 pages PCMag.com/PC Magazine slide show showing "the eerie world of abandoned computers. Urban explorers document forgotten digital tools of another time.

In the heart of civilization lie places abandoned. For whatever reason, people retreat from these spaces entirely, leaving behind unintentional time capsules filled with objects and equipment from another era, including computers.

In recent years, a risky hobby called 'urban exploration' has gained momentum on the Internet. Urban explorers risk life, limb, and imprisonment to document derelict buildings and urban decay. They are guided by a code of ethics not to disturb what they find, as illustrated by their main credo: 'Take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints.'

In the following slides, we'll uncover the hidden and often eerie world of abandoned computers in 12 photographs/photos. that remind us both of our own propensity for technological excess and of the seemingly inexorable force of tech obsolescence that has overtaken our civilization at a breakneck pace...""


Submission + - Ten/10 Western Games and Trends That Never Caught (dorkly.com)

Ant writes: "This three pages Dorkly article tells the "ten/10 western games and trends that never caught on in Japan" — "In the olden days of gaming, everything worthwhile came out of Japan, as did all of the console manufacturers. Now, with the game market being much more globalized, American developers have as strong of a foothold in our culture as ever. That is, everywhere but in Japan. There are a lot of facets of our gaming culture that the United States/U.S. holds dear that the Japanese have never even given a second thought to. Here's a list of some of the most surprising (and maybe least surprising, in some cases)...""

Submission + - An University Librarian Blasts Librarian Depicted (wordpress.com)

Ant writes: "This Libreaction blog rants on how "real librarians sometimes silently cringe at the shockingly-poor reference interviews conducted by librarians on television/TV and in the movies.

But Andy Priestner, head business librarian at Cambridge University, isn't going to hide under the reference desk. He's come out swinging against Jocasta Nu, the librarian over the Jedi Archives depicted in the Star Wars franchise. As the above video illustrates, Nu really doesn't know how to discern and meet customer needs. Priestner writes at length about Nu's dubious use of space and access policies ..."

Seen on Neatorama."


Submission + - The Future of Demo Art: The Demoscene in the 2010s (pelulamu.net)

Ant writes: "Ville-Matias Heikkilä (viznut/pwp) shares his random thoughts about the future of the demoscene titled "The Future of Demo Art: The Demoscene in the 2010s" — "In end of a decade is often regarded as an end of an era. Around the new year 2009-2010, I was thinking a lot about the future of demo art, which I have been involved with since the mid-nineties. The mental processes that led to this essay were also inspired by various events of the 2010s..."

Seen in a Pouet bulletin board system/BBS (aka forum/message board) thread."

The Internet

Submission + - HotelChatter's Annual Hotel WiFi Report 2010 (hotelchatter.com)

Ant writes: "HotelChatter's Annual Hotel WiFi Report 2010 — "This year marks HotelChatter's sixth annual hotel wifi report. Over the years we've documented the progression of hotel WiFi, from blatant disregard, to price-gouging for WiFi access, and reliable WiFi for loyalty program members, through guests taking matters in to their own hands with wireless laptop/notebook cards and 3G access. A year ago, we thought guest demand for free, reliable, hotel WiFi might just go away, thanks to 3G.

Well guess what? The demand for hotel WiFi has not gone away, quite the opposite, a growing number of hotel guests not only demand the hotel they book have proper wireless access but most will consider *not* staying at a hotel that can't meet their basic access needs. That's right, WiFi is a make or break amenity for many hotel guests that can sway booking decisions — and that isn't going away..."

Seen on Boing Boing."


Submission + - Frontline's 1.5 Hours Documentary: Digital Nation (pbs.org)

Ant writes: "Frontline has a 1.5 hours documentary video titled "Digital Nation" — "A television (TV)/Web report on the digital revolution and how it's changing our lives, with video stories, interviews, and user-generated video on relationships, information overload, education, the military, parenting, brain development, and more...""

Submission + - Malware threat reports fail to add up. (infosecurity-us.com)

Ant writes: "Infosecurity recently reports that "the December malware threat reports are trickling in from vendors — and they all appear to be different. Fortinet, Sunbelt Software, and Kaspersky all published their lists of the most prevalent malware strains for the last month of 2009, but they didn't match up, leading to an admission that users will inevitably be confused by the results..."

Seen in Smokey Bear's DSL/Broadband Reports security forum thread."

The Internet

Submission + - The History of the Internet in a Nutshell (sixrevisions.com)

antdude writes: Six Revisions shares "The History of the Internet in a Nutshell" starting 1969 — "Here's a brief history of the Internet, including important dates, people, projects, sites, and other information that should give you at least a partial picture of what this thing we call the Internet really is, and where it came from.

While the complete history of the Internet could easily fill a few books, this article should familiarize you with key milestones and events related to the growth and evolution of the Internet between 1969 to 2009..."

Seen on Digg.

"Let's show this prehistoric bitch how we do things downtown!" -- The Ghostbusters