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Comment: Same player in local and multiplayer: cheating? (Score 2) 221

by ant-1 (#41480991) Attached to: Game Review: <em>Torchlight 2</em>
This is not really a comment, more of a question: wasn't the biggest complain about Diablo 2 the fact that it was wide open to cheating/hacking due to the fact that you could bring online the stuff you acquired offline? I'm not really familiar with the genre, I only played like three D2 sessions and no torchlight so don't bash me for my ignorance but isn't it exactly the same here ?

What is gonna prevent my neighbor's kid from hacking the sandworm-slaying-axe-of-madness and bringing it online to cut me in half? Damn kid, always playing on my lawn instead of grinding his gear like a real man.

Comment: Re:FLAC (Score 2, Informative) 361

by ant-1 (#41400145) Attached to: Neil Young Pushes Pono, Says Piracy Is the New Radio
FLAC is lossless from an audio CD perspective. There is a huge difference between studio recordings and CD content (you lose a lot on both ends of the spectrum, among other changes). That's why audiophiles prefer vinyl, because it captures more sound from thestudio recording. Pono is a try to capture like 100% of what the musician get on the studio tapes.

Comment: They're giving the employees a cut (Score 1) 103

by ant-1 (#39718913) Attached to: Twitter: 'We Promise To Not Be a Patent Troll'
That's just a way of giving their innovator employees a cut of litigations. Because no employee will ever want to refuse to litigate aggressively if offered a cut of the supposed profits to come from it. And of course I guess it will make sure twitter never behave like Lodsys, but that was not really expected. They may also refrain from behaving like Microsoft, the half-demon, half-angel on the block, which is a good thing I guess.

Oh and it also piss on the future buyers of twitter which will have to manage a gazillion good relations with ex-employees just to make sure the portfolio does not vanish into thin air.

Comment: Re:Culture loss? (Score 2) 404

by ant-1 (#38792567) Attached to: Outgoing CRTC Head Says Technology Is Eroding Canadian Culture

Why is the US pointed at as the reason for their culture loss?

Because the US is the biggest exporter of culture in the world. It's not a secret that since WWII the US understood the concept of soft power and that culture projection is a big part of it. It's good for the diplomacy, it's good for the economy (everybody wants to resemble the americans, listen to their bands, wear their gear, etc.).

It's also very annoying, mainly because it brings uniformity. And because, yes, it crushes other cultures in its path. Not willingly, more like Walmart kills small retailers.

Comment: They most certainely broke the law (Score 1) 267

by ant-1 (#32627762) Attached to: Why Google's Wi-Fi Payload Collection Was Inadvertent
There's a very good article at The Register (I know, a lot of people here consider it a tabloid but the author is Alexander Hanff of Privacy International) explaining why it is almost impossible for Google not to have planned the storage and processing of the unencrypted data. It's here.
Their argument boils down to :
- They have software-building experience and processes and therefore it's not possible the code that stores/parses the unencrypted data is rogue code.
- They actually stored the data, they were not just processing it for location purposes then discarding it (as confirmed by the french agency in charge of privacy that obtained a portion of the data (article here). It's doubtful they exploited the passwords they found, though.

So they broke the law by retaining private data and they planned on doing it (their code development processes surely would have picked up the code doing the storing before production if this code was not wanted) thereby proving intent. I don't think (as the author does) that they intended to use the code for location-based advertising, but nonetheless Google must respond of its actions before the justice of the offended countries.
Businesses

After Domain Squatting, Twitter Squatting 201

Posted by timothy
from the kept-in-a-special-safe dept.
carusoj writes "Squatting on domain names is nothing new, but Twitter has created a new opportunity for squatters, in the form of Twitter IDs. Writes Richard Stiennon: 'Is there evidence of Twitter squatting (squitting?) Let's check. Yup, every single-letter TwitID is taken ... How about common words? Garage, wow, war, warcraft, Crisco, Coke, Pepsi, Nike, and Chevrolet are all taken. My guess is that Twitter squatters have grabbed all of these in the hopes that they will be worth selling in the not too distant future. Of course the legitimate holders of brands can sue for them and Twitter can just turn them over if asked. But, because the investment and risk for the squatter is zero, you are going to see the rapid evaporation of available Twitter IDs.'"
Medicine

Identical Twins Not Identical After All 159

Posted by samzenpus
from the one-of-these-things-is-not-like-the-other dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Contrary to previous beliefs, identical twins are not genetically identical. Researchers studied 19 pairs of monozygotic, or identical, twins and found differences in copy number variation in DNA which occurs when a set of coding letters in DNA are missing, or when extra copies of segments of DNA are produced. In most cases, variation in the number of copies likely has no impact on health or development but in others, it may be one factor in the likelihood of developing a disease (pdf). "Those differences may point the way to better understanding of genetic diseases when we study so-called discordant monozygotic twins....a pair of twins where one twin has a disorder and the other does not," says Carl Bruder, Ph.D. "If twin A develops Parkinson's and twin B does not, the region of their genome where they show differences is a target for further investigation to discover the basic genetic underpinnings of the disease.""
The Internet

Why Trolls and Flames Happen 331

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the some-things-will-never-change dept.
AnonymousHack writes "New Scientist examines why people are in general more rude and abusive online. 'Psychologically, we are "distant" from the person we're talking to and less focused on our own identity. As a result we're more prone to aggressive behavior' says one psychologist, who also cites research showing messages received by email are always perceived more negatively than on the phone." Just more proof for the Greater Internet F***wad Theory.
Robotics

New Robots Hunt Pirates by Sea 207

Posted by samzenpus
from the long-john-silicon dept.
mattnyc99 writes "PopularMechanics.com takes a peek into the growing world of high-tech piracy on the open seas, which the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard are looking to cut off by investing in a new fleet of superfast, gun-mounted unmanned surface vessels (USVs). From the article: "The Interceptor is available now. But the USV market is just getting started: Two months ago, British defense firm Qinetiq debuted its own robotic vessel, the jetski-size Sentry. Among its potential duties is intruder investigation, which could include scouting out unidentified boats, along the lines of the raft that detonated alongside the USS Cole in Yemen, as well as offering a first look at a possible pirate-controlled vessel.""
Apple

Apple Updates iMac, iLife, .Mac 528

Posted by kdawson
from the more-goodies dept.
Apple just announced new iMacs. They are aluminum and come in 20" (two models) and 24". There's a new view called "Events" in iPhoto that should make it easier to deal with large photo libraries. Apple's .Mac service is enhanced with .Mac Web Gallery, which integrates with the new iTunes and also the iPhone. It's a Web 2.0 app now. And iMovie is being replaced by a completely new app of the same name. Steve Jobs claimed that with it you can put together a 5-minute movie in 30 minutes, and he demo'ed that from the stage. iWeb, iDVD, and GarageBand get new features too. And .Mac subscribers get 10 GB of storage. Here is Engadget's blow-by-blow coverage, and Wired's.
Role Playing (Games)

Second Life Shuts Down Gambling 263

Posted by kdawson
from the more-and-more-like-first-life dept.
Tech.Luver sends us to The Inquirer, which notes the banning of all gambling in Second Life. Here is the Linden Labs blog post about the change in policy, which is, to say the least, not popular. From the article: "[T]he large chunk of users that enjoyed using in-world casinos and betting Linden Dollars on events both inside and outside the game world will now have nothing left to do. Perhaps more to the point for Linden, the move will cut off the revenues earned from those owning Casino-style islands in the game, the owners of which are some of the top contributors to the Linden coffers through currency fees and land rental."

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