Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Image

Salad Spinner Made Into Life-Saving Centrifuge 87 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the kitchen-and-lab-equipment dept.
lucidkoan writes "Two Rice University students have transformed a simple salad spinner into an electricity-free centrifuge that can be used to diagnose diseases on the cheap. Created by Lauren Theis and Lila Kerr, the ingenious DIY centrifuge is cobbled together using a salad spinner, some plastic lids, combs, yogurt containers, and a hot glue gun. The simple and easily-replicated design could be an invaluable tool for clinics in the developing world, enabling them to separate blood to detect diseases like anemia without electricity."

Comment: Re:No more DRM on music, but... (Score 1) 1079

by anotherone (#26349965) Attached to: Apple Intros 17" Unibody MBP, DRM-Free iTunes

Still, it's a step in the right direction, and I applaud the people over at Amazon (and everyone else selling music without DRM) for doing it first. Without that step, I'm willing to bet that Apple would have stayed with DRM on their music catalog.

I'd take that bet. Apple was selling DRM-free music before Amazon even HAD an MP3 store.

Steve Jobs' "Thoughts On Music" manifesto where he basically said "we hate DRM and want to get rid of it" was posted in February 2007. They started actually selling DRM free music under the "iTunes Plus" name in April 2007. Not everything in their library, mostly indy and EMI labels, but it was more DRM-free downloads than anyone at the time.

Amazon MP3 didn't open until September 2007.

Technology

New Nanotech Fabric Never Gets Wet 231

Posted by timothy
from the good-for-lining-lunchboxes dept.
holy_calamity writes "New Scientist reports on a simple coating for polyester that renders it unwettable — even after two months underwater it emerges dry to the touch. Water cannot attach to the new fabric thanks to nanostructured filaments and a structure that traps a constant air layer. One potential use is for low-drag swim wear."
Portables (Apple)

Users Rage Over Missing FireWire On New MacBooks 820

Posted by kdawson
from the liar-liar-pants-not-wired dept.
CWmike writes "Apple customers, unhappy that the company dropped FireWire from its new MacBook (not the Pro), are venting their frustrations on the company's support forum in hundreds of messages. Within minutes of Apple CEO Steve Jobs wrapping up a launch event in Cupertino, Calif., users started several threads to vent over the omission. 'Apple really screwed up with no FireWire port,' said Russ Tolman, who inaugurated a thread that by Thursday has collected more than 300 messages and been viewed over 8,000 times. 'No MacBook with [FireWire] — no new MacBook for me,' added Simon Meyer in a message posted yesterday. Several mentioned that FireWire's disappearance means that the new MacBooks could not be connected to other Macs using Target Disk Mode, and one noted that iMovie will have no way to connect to new MacBooks. Others pointed out that the previous-generation MacBook, which Apple is still selling at a reduced price of $999, includes a FireWire port. Apple introduced FireWire into its product lines in 1999 and championed the standard."
Businesses

Changing Customers Password Without Consent 435

Posted by samzenpus
from the leave-my-words-alone dept.
risinganger writes "BBC News is reporting that a customer had his password changed without his knowledge. After some less than satisfactory service the customer in question changed his password to 'Llyods is pants.' At some point after that, a member of staff changed the password to 'no it's not.' Requests to change it back to 'Llyods is pants,' 'Barclays is better,' or 'censorship' were met with refusal. Personally I found the original change funny, like the customer did. After all, god forbid a sense of humour rears its ugly head in business. What isn't acceptable is the refusal to change it per the customer's requests after that."
Image

Bottom of The Barrel Book Reviews-Confessions of a Recovering Preppie 228 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the terminal-case dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Michael de Mare's, Confessions of a Recovering Preppie, has been sitting on my desk a long time, for good reason. They say you can't always judge a book by it's cover but in this case, the unintentionally embarrassing front is perfect. Confessions is a painfully ordinary collection of college stories. Michael seems to have a different definition for the word preppie than the good people at Webster or I do. Even though the author specializes in cryptography, he seems unable to decipher any social situation, himself or the code to writing a book worth reading. Click below to see how confusing it gets.

"No job too big; no fee too big!" -- Dr. Peter Venkman, "Ghost-busters"

Working...