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Comment: Re: Why ext4 (Score 1) 221

It was great... until the other filesystems caught up while it was not under development.

It was great... until it went on a rampage and murdered your data. I kid, but I'm also serious. When it was in current development, no other fs was as efficient with small files, and there's a lot of those on the average Unix system so that's of great interest. But it also was the least reliable filesystem in common use. So it was really never worth using.

Comment: Re:How about ... (Score 1) 463

by drinkypoo (#49754419) Attached to: Ads Based On Browsing History Are Coming To All Firefox Users

I can't opt out of paying the advertising tax (through everyday higher prices of every single damn object I purchase).

You can't opt out completely, not if you want to be a functioning member of society, but you can mitigate the issue by choosing to buy as many products as possible which are not advertised. One of the nifty things about the web is that you can actually find those products now...

Comment: Re:I want the same question answered clearly (Score 1) 221

by drinkypoo (#49754355) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What's the Best Dumb Phone?

Motorola made an e-Ink candybar phone for India at one point, is that still around? Would it be useful in any other countries, given the frequencies? It was supposed to have more or less best-ever battery life, like a month of standby or something nutty like that, and days of talk time.

Comment: Re:FAQ (Score 1) 131

by squiggleslash (#49750009) Attached to: Pre-Orders Start For Neo900 Open Source Phone

From what people are writing here, there are multiple definitions of "perfectly well". Someone in an above thread complains that capacitive screens require only the lightest touch, ensuring that they make mistakes when trying to use their fingernail to accurately press a specific pixel.

That, to me, says that the N900 and Neo900 do not have "touch" sensitive displays, they require pressure. I'm finding it improbable (and I'm willing to be proven wrong, but I'm increasingly sceptical as this videophilesque discussion continues) that the usual range of gestures we've come to know and, yes, love, are going to work nearly as well on that type of screen.

If I'm wrong and a light tap will always work, and a swipe will never be broken up into multiple gestures or ignored altogether, and so on, then I'd be delighted, albeit surprised the technology isn't being used anywhere else.

Comment: Re:Pretty stupid politicians (Score 1) 34

by drinkypoo (#49749487) Attached to: Security Researchers Wary of Wassenaar Rules

You probably can't even list the apps installed on your laptop, let alone want to uninstall and reinstall them later. You're not 'pretty stupid' for that, its normal.

Uh, what? I most certainly can list the apps installed on my laptop, in a variety of ways. What kind of moron are you that you can't?

Comment: Re:What does that even mean (Score 1) 91

An alternative theory for the same conclusion, which I favour because experimental data is more accessible is:
Climbing mountains implies the increase of possibility of falling to great depths. Which means that, statistically speaking, when you go to the mountain you have indeed less mass beneath you than if you walked and occasionally fell elsewhere, where the depth is lower, or in the sea, where you float in mass denser than air.

Gotta love science.

Comment: What does that even mean (Score 3, Insightful) 91

Less mass beneath my feet? That depends very much on how you measure "beneath", right? I'd argue that if your load is being distributed into something, it's beneath you. If I'm standing on a mountain which is sufficiently sharply pointed, then almost the entire mountain might be engaged in supporting my weight — cue fat jokes. But anything it's standing on is going to be the same thing, so wouldn't that make it more mass "beneath" my feet?

Anyway, I RTFA (my geek card is in the mail, it should be back at the processing facility shortly) and the article is all gushily excited that "thereâ(TM)s far more crust underneath the mountains than there is in the oceans!" Wait, was this a surprise to anyone? Mountains happen when earth gets shoved up into the air. They're not pimples.

So in short, the article comes to completely the opposite conclusion of the truth: they say that "if you wanted the least amount of mass beneath your feet, youâ(TM)d climb up to the peak of the highest mountain" when in fact, there is more mass beneath your feet if you stand on a mountain than if you stand on the seabed or in a valley, because of all the mass that by definition can't be beneath your feet if you're standing at a lower altitude.

Comment: Re:FAQ (Score 1) 131

by squiggleslash (#49748049) Attached to: Pre-Orders Start For Neo900 Open Source Phone

I'm going to be honest, the more I read this discussion, the move I'm thrown back to old "debates" between advocates of rear projection and plasma TVs, and LCDs, all bemoaning the rise of the latter against such superior technologies as a TV that can only be viewed from one angle (and then not all at the same time), or a TV that requires all 4:3 content be shown in stretch-o-vision to avoid temporary burn-in issues. "But LCDs have a tiny bit of light visible when they're supposed to be black!" screams the videophiles, apparently oblivious to the fact that normal people rarely watch TV in rooms with no ambient light.

The resistive screen they're describing is clearly inferior to capacitive when applied to real world applications. Nobody in their right mind uses their cellphone to "paint" pictures. But everyone uses it to dial numbers, browse websites, and other activities that require a finger, or two, rather than a stylus.

But, hey, for the 0.01% of users who do actually use their cellphones more as an easel than a phone, I guess it might be useful.

The Universe is populated by stable things. -- Richard Dawkins

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