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Submission + - UK court orders H33t, Kickass Torrents and Fenopy blocked (

angry tapir writes: "A court in the U.K. has ordered key Internet service providers in the country to block three torrent sites on a complaint from music labels including EMI Records and Sony Music. The High Court of Justice, Chancery Division, ordered six ISPs including Virgin Media, British Telecommunications and British Sky Broadcasting to block H33t, Kickass Torrents and Fenopy."

Submission + - Whonix: Building an anonymous operating system (

angry tapir writes: "Whonix is an attempt to build an open source operating system that puts a premium on privacy. It's based on Debian and Tor, but uses a novel virtual dual machine setup to sandbox applications so that even if there is an IP leak (either intentional or unintentional) a user's 'real' IP address should still be safe (with all the caveats that using Tor implies). I caught up with its creator Adrelanos to talk about how the project works and his future plans for the OS."

Submission + - ACLU, EFF challenge law targeting online activities of sex offenders (

angry tapir writes: "Two civil rights groups have filed a lawsuit challenging parts of a California ballot measure that requires registered sex offenders to turn over their Internet identities and service providers to police. The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California and the Electronic Frontier Foundation said parts of Proposition 35 restrict the constitutionally protected speech of all registered sex offenders in the state. About 81 percent of Californians voted to approve the Californians Against Sexual Exploitation (CASE) Act, which increases prison sentences and fines for human traffickers. Portions of Proposition 35 would require all registered sex offenders — even those with decades-old, low-level offenses like misdemeanor indecent exposure — to turn over information about their Internet accounts to police"
The Courts

Submission + - US DOJ drops charges against two seized websites ( 2

angry tapir writes: "The U.S. Department of Justice has dropped its case against two Spanish websites that stream sports events nearly 17 months after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement seized the sites and shut them down for alleged copyright violations. In a one-page brief to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York on Wednesday, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara of the district said his office had dropped the case against and ICE seized the two sites on Jan. 31, 2011, and the DOJ asked the court to order that Puerto 80 Projects, the owner of the sites, forfeit the sites to the U.S. government."

Submission + - Twitter to appeal turning over protestor's messages (

angry tapir writes: "Twitter plans to appeal a ruling to turn over the once-public tweets of an Occupy Wall Street protestor charged with disorderly conduct, a case the company says threatens the First Amendment rights of its users. A New York Criminal Court judge ruled last month that Twitter should turn over the tweets of Malcolm Harris, since his messages were public and are not the same as an email or a private chat, which would require a search warrant."
The Courts

Submission + - Megaupload users have to pay for their data (

angry tapir writes: "U.S. federal prosecutors are fine with Megaupload users recovering their data — as long as they pay for it. The government's position was explained in a court filing on Friday concerning one of the many interesting side issues that has emerged from the shutdown of Megaupload, formerly one of the most highly trafficked file-sharing sites. Prosecutors were responding to a motion filed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation in late March on behalf of Kyle Goodwin, an Ohio-based sports reporter who used Megaupload legitimately for storing videos. the government argues that it only copied part of the Megaupload data and the physical servers were never seized. Megaupload's 1,103 servers — which hold upwards of 28 petabytes of data — are still held by Carpathia Hosting. Goodwin's options, prosecutors said, are either pay — or sue — Carpathia, or sue Megaupload."

Submission + - Stalemate between ISPs and rights holders in Australia (

angry tapir writes: "Talks between ISPs and rights holders in Australia over copyright policing appear to have reached a stalemate. ISPs, rights holders, consumer groups and the attorney-general’s department today met in closed-door talks about who should police copyright infringement and who should pay for it."

Submission + - Security experts push Ukraine to drop VX Heavens charges (

angry tapir writes: "For more than a decade, "Herm1t" — the online nickname of Andrey Baranovich — has chronicled the development of malicious code on a website called VX Heavens. VX Heavens was dedicated to recording the history of malicious code, a site hailed by some computer security researchers as an invaluable resource but one of little practical use to real cybercriminals. The website was shut down by Ukrainian authorities last month, and Baranovich faces charges for allegedly selling malicious code in violation of the country's computer crime laws. Baranovich is gaining support from computer security experts who say the accusations are unfounded. Those experts are writing to the authorities in Donetsk, Ukraine, asking that Baranovich be left alone."
The Courts

Submission + - Megaupload host wants out ( 1

angry tapir writes: "Carpathia Hosting, a US company hosting the frozen data of millions of users of the file sharing site Megaupload, has gone to court to argue it should not keep the files if it is not being paid. The company has filed an emergency motion in the US Federal Court in the state of Virginia seeking protection from the expense of hosting the data of up to 66 million users. "While Carpathia has never had access to the data on Megaupload servers and has had no mechanism for returning that data to Megaupload users, we have been attempting over many weeks to resolve this matter to the satisfaction of all parties involved, in a manner that would allow for Megaupload users to be in a position to ultimately recover their data," Brian Winter, the company's chief marketing officer says."

Submission + - Beijing's real name rules for microblogging take effect (

angry tapir writes: "New regulations requiring China's Twitter-like microblogging sites to only allow posts from verified users have been met with reluctance from some of the nation's Internet users as the rules went into effect on Friday. Beijing's city government announced the regulations last year, as a way to protect users and eliminate rumors on the sites. But the rules were also part of a larger effort by authorities to control the country's burgeoning social networking sites, which have often become forums to criticize the government."

Submission + - Protect IP Act may be amended (

angry tapir writes: "The controversial US copyright enforcement bill the Protect IP Act may be amended on the Senate floor later this month in response to ongoing concerns about its provisions affecting Internet service providers and the domain-name system, according to the bill's chief sponsor said: Senator Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat."

Submission + - EFF, ACLU file lawsuits over Patriot Act data coll (

angry tapir writes: "Two civil liberties groups have filed lawsuits asking the U.S. Department of Justice to detail its collection of electronic data and other information under the 10-year-old counterterrorism law, the USA Patriot Act. The lawsuits, from the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the American Civil Liberties Union, seek to have the DOJ and its U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation branch turn over all information related to information requests allowed under Section 215 of the Patriot Act. Section 215 allows the FBI to ask for a court order to obtain "any tangible things," including books, records, papers, and documents, related to a terrorism investigation."

Submission + - ACTA will be signed Saturday, US and Japan say ( 1

angry tapir writes: "The the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement is scheduled to be signed this Saturday in Tokyo, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has announced. Representatives of the U.S., Japan, Australia, Canada, the E.U., South Korea, Mexico, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore and Switzerland will be at the signing ceremony for (ACTA), according to Japan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. ACTA could also allow member countries to introduce the so-called three-strikes rule, requiring ISPs to shut off service to subscribers who continue to download or share material protected by copyright after receiving two warnings."

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