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+ - Bitcoin in China still chugging along, a year after clampdown->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "A year after China began tightening regulations around Bitcoin, the virtual currency is still thriving in the country, albeit on the fringes, according to its largest exchange. Bitcoin prices may have declined, but Chinese buyers are still trading the currency in high volumes with the help of BTC China, an exchange that witnessed the boom days back in 2013, only to see the bust following the Chinese government's announcement, in December of that year, that banks would be banned from trading in bitcoin."
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+ - Australian government outlines website-blocking scheme->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "The Australian government has revealed its (previously mooted) proposed legislation that will allow copyright holders to apply for court orders that will force ISPs to block access to pirate websites. It forms part of a broader Australian crackdown on online copyright infringement, which also includes a warning notice scheme for alleged infringers."
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+ - To avoid NSA, Cisco gear gets delivered to strange address-> 1

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "One of the most successful U.S. National Security Agency spying programs involved intercepting IT equipment en route to customers and modifying it. It appears some Cisco Systems customers have taken steps to prevent NSA tampering, including having Cisco ship gear to addresses that appear unrelated to the customer."
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+ - Researchers find same RSA encryption key used 28,000 times-> 1

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "While scanning the Internet to see how many servers and devices are still vulnerable to the "FREAK" flaw, researchers with Royal Holloway of the University of London discovered large numbers were accepting 512-bit RSA keys — and large numbers of devices using the same public keys. In one egregious example, 28,394 routers running a SSL VPN module all use the same 512-bit public RSA key."
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+ - Fujitsu could help smartphone chips run cooler->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "If parts of your phone are sometimes too hot to handle, Fujitsu may have the answer: a thin heat pipe that can spread heat around mobile devices, reducing extremes of temperature. Fujitsu Laboratories created a heat pipe in the form of a loop that's less than 1mm thick. The device can transfer about 20W, about five times more heat than current thin heat pipes or thermal materials, the company said."
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+ - Is open-source hardware gaining critical mass?->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "The Open Compute Project, which wants to open up hardware the same way Linux opened up software, is starting to tackle its forklift problem. You can't download boxes or racks, so open-source hardware needs a supply chain, said OCP President and Chairman Frank Frankovsky, kicking off the Open Compute Project Summit in San Jose."
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+ - Microsoft asks US court to ban Kyocera's Android phones->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "Microsoft has asked a court in Seattle to ban Kyocera's DuraForce, Hydro and Brigadier lines of cellular phones in the US, alleging that they infringed seven Microsoft patents. The software giant has in its complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington charged that some Kyocera phone features that come from its use of the Android operating system infringe its patents."
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+ - Red Hat strips down for Docker->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "Reacting to the surging popularity of the Docker virtualization technology, Red Hat has customized a version of its Linux distribution to run Docker containers. The Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host strips away all the utilities residing in the stock distribution of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) that aren't needed to run Docker containers. Removing unneeded components saves on storage space, and reduces the time needed for updating and booting up. It also provides fewer potential entry points for attackers. (Product page is here.)"
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+ - Intel to rebrand Atom chips along lines of Core processors->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "Intel has announced that going forward it will use style of branding for its Atom chips that is similar to its branding for Core chips. Atom CPUs will have the X3, X5 and X7 designations, much like with the Core i3, i5 and i7 brands. An Atom X3 will deliver good performance, X5 will be better and X7 will be the best, an Intel spokeswoman said."
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+ - Europol and security vendors disrupt massive Ramnit botnet->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "European law enforcement agencies have seized command-and-control servers used by Ramnit, a malware program that steals online banking credentials, FTP passwords, session cookies and personal files from victims. Ramnit started out in 2010 as a computer worm capable of infecting EXE, DLL, HTM, and HTML files. However, over time it evolved into an information-stealing Trojan that's distributed in a variety of ways."
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+ - Australian ISPs to introduce '3-strike' style anti-piracy scheme->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "Australian ISPs are considering a draft industry code, developed in response to government threats to step in and do it for them, that will implement a 'three notice' scheme for alleged copyright infringement. If an ISP customer gets three notices in 12 months, a rights holder can go to court to obtain their details and potentially take legal action against them. (The other part of the government's copyright crackdown is the introduction of a scheme to have pirate websites blocked — the government has yet to introduce the legislation for it, however.)"
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+ - Silverlight exploits up, Java down, Cisco reports->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "Attempts to exploit Silverlight soared massively in late 2014 according to research from Cisco. However, the use of Silverlight in absolute terms is still low compared to the use of Java and Flash as an attack vector, according to Cisco's 2015 Annual Security Report. The report's assessment of the 2014 threat landscape also notes that researchers observed Flash-based malware that interacted with JavaScript. The Flash/JS malware was split between two files to make it easier to evade anti-malware protection. (The full report is available here [registration required].)"
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