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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 671 declined, 468 accepted (1139 total, 41.09% accepted)

+ - Australian defence controls could criminalise teaching encryption->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: You might not think that an academic computer science course could be classified as an export of military technology. But under Australia's Defence Trade Controls Act – which passed into law in April, and will come into force next year – there is a real possibility that even seemingly innocuous educational and research activities could fall foul of Australian defence export control laws.
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+ - MenuetOS, an operating system written entirely in assembly, hits 1.0->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: MenuetOS, a GUI-toting, x86-based operating system written entirely in assembly language that's super-fast and can fit on a floppy disk, has hit version 1.0 — after almost a decade and a half of development. (And yes, it can run Doom). I caught up with its developers to talk about the operating system and what comes next for it.
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+ - Microsoft designed a special processor to handle HoloLens data->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: Microsoft shared some additional details about the components inside its augmented reality HoloLens headset during the company's Build conference. Like a traditional PC, HoloLens contains a CPU and GPU, said Alex Kipman, a technical fellow in Microsoft's operating system group, on Thursday. But the headset also uses a custom built holographic processing unit to handle data coming from the many sensors contained in the device.
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+ - One year on, Microsoft's Nokia deal isn't a clear winner->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: It was a marriage of convenience for two industry giants whose past successes weren't helping them win in the red-hot smartphone market. One year later, it's hard to say that Microsoft's acquisition of Nokia's device business has produced the results its backers envisioned. In the wake of the US$7.2 billion acquisition, Lumia smartphones and the Windows Phone OS are still running into many of the same market roadblocks.
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+ - Google's Project Loon close to launching thousands of balloons->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: Google says its Project Loon is close to being able to produce and launch thousands of balloons to provide Internet access from the sky. Such a number would be required to provide reliable Internet access to users in remote areas that are currently unserved by terrestrial networks, said Mike Cassidy, the Google engineer in charge of the project. The ambitious project has been underway for a couple of years and involves beaming down LTE cellular signals to handsets on the ground from balloons thousands of feet in the air, well above the altitude that passenger jets fly.
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+ - 3D printed guns might lead to law changes in Australia-> 1

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: An inquiry by an Australian Senate committee has recommended the introduction of uniform laws across jurisdictions in the country "regulating the manufacture of 3D printed firearms and firearm parts". Although current laws are in general believed to cover 3D printed guns, there are concerns there may inconsistencies across different Australian jurisdictions. Although there aren't any high-profile cases of 3D printed weapons being used in crimes in the country, earlier this year a raid in Queensland recovered 3D printed firearm parts.
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+ - Microsoft creates a Docker-like container for Windows->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: Hoping to build on the success of Docker-based Linux containers, Microsoft has developed a container technology to run on its Windows Server operating system. The Windows Server Container can be used to package an application so it can be easily moved across different servers. It uses a similar approach to Docker's, in that all the containers running on a single server all share the same operating system kernel, making them smaller and more responsive than standard virtual machines.
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+ - Bitcoin in China still chugging along, a year after clampdown->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: A year after China began tightening regulations around Bitcoin, the virtual currency is still thriving in the country, albeit on the fringes, according to its largest exchange. Bitcoin prices may have declined, but Chinese buyers are still trading the currency in high volumes with the help of BTC China, an exchange that witnessed the boom days back in 2013, only to see the bust following the Chinese government's announcement, in December of that year, that banks would be banned from trading in bitcoin.
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+ - Australian government outlines website-blocking scheme->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: The Australian government has revealed its (previously mooted) proposed legislation that will allow copyright holders to apply for court orders that will force ISPs to block access to pirate websites. It forms part of a broader Australian crackdown on online copyright infringement, which also includes a warning notice scheme for alleged infringers.
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+ - To avoid NSA, Cisco gear gets delivered to strange address-> 1

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: One of the most successful U.S. National Security Agency spying programs involved intercepting IT equipment en route to customers and modifying it. It appears some Cisco Systems customers have taken steps to prevent NSA tampering, including having Cisco ship gear to addresses that appear unrelated to the customer.
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+ - Researchers find same RSA encryption key used 28,000 times-> 1

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: While scanning the Internet to see how many servers and devices are still vulnerable to the "FREAK" flaw, researchers with Royal Holloway of the University of London discovered large numbers were accepting 512-bit RSA keys — and large numbers of devices using the same public keys. In one egregious example, 28,394 routers running a SSL VPN module all use the same 512-bit public RSA key.
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+ - Fujitsu could help smartphone chips run cooler->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir writes: If parts of your phone are sometimes too hot to handle, Fujitsu may have the answer: a thin heat pipe that can spread heat around mobile devices, reducing extremes of temperature. Fujitsu Laboratories created a heat pipe in the form of a loop that's less than 1mm thick. The device can transfer about 20W, about five times more heat than current thin heat pipes or thermal materials, the company said.
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If a 6600 used paper tape instead of core memory, it would use up tape at about 30 miles/second. -- Grishman, Assembly Language Programming

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