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Comment: Re:Some realistic space battles in literature (Score 1) 396

by angel'o'sphere (#48021421) Attached to: The Physics of Space Battles

Yes, I know, I have all the books :)
However he likes to write sometimes with Eric Flint, who writes with many other SF authirs like the 'newcommer' David Drake. And again in a 'historic' SF (time travel to late roman times) they beleive that 'crossing the T' is a usefull/valid tactics if you have catapults or othe ranged weapons on board (especially as the enemies _dont't_ have ranged weapons except archers!)
Google for "Bellisarius", by Eric Flint and David Drake, besides thise minor 'hick ups' it is a nice long set of stories (7 or 8 books)

Comment: Re:SubjectsInCommentsAreStupid (Score 0) 394

by angel'o'sphere (#48020295) Attached to: Scientists Seen As Competent But Not Trusted By Americans

There is a new pretty accurate (well slighly missleading) correction that supports me :)

So, regarding common sense: you really believe in a 'state of law', a democracy, a first world nation: scientists can be convicted for "not predicting" something?

Sorry, no offense ... are you an american?

Comment: Re:Scientists don't *NEED* to be trusted! (Score 1) 394

by angel'o'sphere (#48019561) Attached to: Scientists Seen As Competent But Not Trusted By Americans

Most theories we talk about in our days are proven in the scientific sense, but not necessarily in the mathematic sense, if that is what you mean.

They are called a theory, because that is what the word theory means in physics, however some call them laws :)

Comment: Re:No warning? (Score 1) 53

by angel'o'sphere (#48019449) Attached to: Update: At Least 31 People Feared Dead After Japan Volcano Erupts

Erm, that issue was months long in the european press.
Yes the scientists new that a quake is imminent, they even published stuff about it in magazines but they failed to inform the mayour of the towns in question or any other official organizations.
And that is if I'm not mistaken even clearly mentioned on the article linked before.

Regarding tremors, there are clear patterns indicating a soon to happen quake. More modern approaches use measure 'glow' of stone under stress, or electric fields.

Comment: Re:Does Swift work on older iOS versions? (Score 1) 306

I simply doubt that companies other than Apple have any means to collect reliable data at all.

Otherwise we had not that company releasing every year a statistics claiming that Microsofts web server (IIS) where the most widely used one, ah well second most widely used :)

However if you have ideas how they measure iOS versions share them, I'm full ear.

There was mo information right in front of me, you gave me two links, I checked one and the 'usage distribution' of iOSes made no sense at all ... and there was no information how they gathered that statistic, hence I doubt it is reliable.

Comment: Re:Does Swift work on older iOS versions? (Score 1) 306

Yes, but where did he say this? I want to be sure you aren't misinterpreting him or that there isn't another factor involved.

He wrote that in an eMail to me. But there might be other factors involved. I dig in my mails and ask again.

Of course they do. Do you really think they are just making the numbers up?
Yes, I guess the numbers are simply estimates. A marketing company has no real access to such data (except Apple publishes that, never checked it). They only can evaluate their own web server log and 'ask for other companies logs' and thus you only know about the browsers with which those sites are visited. (Assuming Safari on iOS sends the OS version in its client identification string)
So, no. A random company has no idea what OSes people use who never have connected to one of their services.

Almost everybody is using iOS 7+.
As _almost everybody I know_ is not using iOS 7 or 8, I really doubt that :) But perhaps that is a european thing, to upgrade late or never unless something is broken.

Comment: Re:Technological Limitations (Score 1) 249

by angel'o'sphere (#48017097) Attached to: Could We Abort a Manned Mission To Mars?

My point is more that we already have the technology, modern subs can stay under water nearly indefinitely (till their reactor fuel is empty, the crew will starve before anything else is running out)

You would be surprised how good a "primitive" sea vessel is suited for long range travel :D and how "easy" it is to actually go where you want.

Anyway, as you saw in my other post: going to mars and settle there is more an incredible expensive endeavor than a mere technical one.

Comment: Re:Some realistic space battles in literature (Score 1) 396

by angel'o'sphere (#48017051) Attached to: The Physics of Space Battles

The only thing nearly every modern author who is using naval battles as template is: they get the reason why "crossing the T" was a valid tactic (and the time during which it was) completely wrong. However David Weber invented a reason, why it makes sense in "his world"

After world war II and before - lets say 1900 - "crossing the T" made no sense at all.

Comment: Re:There Ain't No Stealth In Space (Score 1) 396

by angel'o'sphere (#48016999) Attached to: The Physics of Space Battles

Larry Nieven did that in one of his "Kzin" stories.

The Kzin used microwaves to heat up an "unarmed" human ship. And the humans tried to "communicate" with their "first contact". The Kzin telepaths where extremely convinced that the humans had no weapons.

However when the humans finally tried to "escape" and their engine was aligned with the Kzin ship, the commander of the Kzin ship final thought: 'an unarmed ship with the biggest laser I have ever seen as its engine ...'

The idea of a "laser drive" is that you use a laser to heat up the reaction mass.

Without reaction mass such a laser is a superb close range cooking device.

16.5 feet in the Twilight Zone = 1 Rod Serling

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