Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

+ - DARPA Working On A Successor To GPS->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "GPS, originally designed by the U.S. Defense Department, has completely transformed navigation for military and civilians alike. But GPS isn't foolproof — it can be jammed and isn't accessible everywhere — and so DAPRA is working on "radically" new technologies to deliver a more advanced position- and navigation-tracking system."
Link to Original Source

+ - Physical sciences contribute 22% of economy->

Submitted by Taco Cowboy
Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "According to a report published in Australit — http://www.science.org.au/scie... — physical sciences, including core disciplines of physics, chemistry, earth sciences and the mathematical sciences have contributed around 22% of the Australian economy The direct contribution of the advanced physical and mathematical sciences is equal to 11% of the economy while additional and flow-on benefits add another 11%, bringing the total benefits to almost A$300 billion a year The report also notes that this estimate is likely to be conservative, and sets out several other areas of benefit that are harder to measure The report carefully considered the pathways by which the advanced physical and mathematical sciences yielded economic benefits and the Australian community’s continuing commitment to the advanced physical and mathematical sciences would be needed to ensure that the benefits from what is essentially a global scientific enterprise will continue to accrue to the Australian economy The economists who prepared the report conducted industry consultations to determine the importance of the physical sciences to Australia’s 506 industry classes. They outline the economic contribution of the sciences to the top 10 industry groups in an appendix to the report There are three distinct sources of useful knowledge, the report says: the core disciplines of mathematics, physics and chemistry can provide useful knowledge individually and it takes banking as an example: "“Part of the banking industry relies on complex mathematically based models that support risk and investment decisions, but on no other science input. We estimate that 3.6% of Australia’s economic output is produced from inputs that embody useful knowledge from a single core discipline” The economists also estimate that 7.3% of Australia’s economic output is produced from inputs that embody useful knowledge from multiple disciplines. So the multidisciplinary nature of science means that the total impact of science is greater than the sum of the contributions of the individual sciences"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Doh! Of course Brogrammers! (Score 1) 184

Just what can you reasonably expect? Most programmers have been emotionally hurt repeatedly by women

WTF? Almost every programmer that I know is in a stable and good relationship with a woman. Except for one female programmer, who is in a stable and good relationship with a man.

+ - Germanwings Crash Prompts Requirement of Two Personnel in Cockpit

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "After a co-pilot appeared to deliberately crash Germanwings flight 4U9525, some airlines are to change their rules to ensure two crew members are in plane cockpits at all times. Two low-cost European carriers EasyJet and Norwegian Air Shuttle are going to roll the new policy into effect almost immediately. The latter company said that they had already been discussing about such scenario before. Air Canada and the Canadian charter airline Air Transat also said they would go with the new rule. Many more carriers are likely to follow. Airlines in United States already follow the "rule of two"."

Comment: bullshit (Score 1) 211

by Tom (#49352371) Attached to: Generate Memorizable Passphrases That Even the NSA Can't Guess

This is total bullshit, and dangerous at that.

Firstly, a lot of software out there still has password length limits, sometimes silently discarding additional characters. You will still need ordinary passwords now and then.

Secondly, no normal human will type a five, six or more words passphrase every time they want to unlock their screen. They will do it for three days while they're hyped on how secure they are now, and then it'll become something they hate, and then they'll change it back to "123".

Thirdly, this is a bit more tricky, the real world security of almost every password scheme I've come across in 15 years of IT security experience is several orders of magnitude lower than the mathematical assumption. Because we consistently forget to take the human factor into account. Maybe some extreme nerds will actually follow this guideline, more normal people will discard words they can't remember for words they can, change things "a little" for convenience, and generally sabotage the whole system without even realizing it. It's the same as with passwords, all over again. Yes, on paper, a password has on the order of 10^16 possible combinations. But in reality, taking into account how people actually choose passwords (even ignoring the whole "password" and "123456" problem!) the actual diversity is more on the order of 10^9. Same here. You think using dice removes the human factor. omg do you underestimate humans!

+ - Boradband ISP Betrayal Forces Homeowner to Sell New House

Submitted by knightsirius
knightsirius (1617607) writes "A Washington homeowner is having :to sell his new house after being refused internet service from Comcast and CenturyLink despite receiving confirmation from both that the location was able to receive broadband service. The whole process took months and involved false assurances and bureaucratic convolutions. The national broadband map database frequently cited by Comcast as proof of sufficient competition lists 10 options at his location, including a gigabit municipal fiber network, but he cannot subscribe to it due to Washington state direct sale restrictions."

+ - China's national firewall hijacks JavaScript to DDoS GitHub-> 2

Submitted by wzyboy
wzyboy (3869601) writes "Twitter user @yegle discovers that HTTP requests to a certain JavaScript is being hijacked to some attack code, which will make reqeusts to GitHub. Since the JavaScript is used on many Chinese websites, GitHub is in fact being DDoSed. This trick is discovered by users when GitHub starts to return alert("WARNING: malicious javascript detected on this domain") in response to these DDoS requests. This will pop up a alert dialog with English text on those Chinese websites."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:pointless (Score 1) 93

They're talking about a Distant Retrograde Orbit (which are stable over a century) in the earth-moon plane at 47,000 miles above moon.

Oy - I was hoping it was clear I was being really sarcastic, but I did not know specifics about the orbit they were thinking of, so thanks for that bit of info.

Comment: Re:Storage space isn't the problem. (Score 1) 68

ROFL...needing THREE installs of the same OS along with a LiveCD just to keep a working system thanks to systemd, while the other guy has to use XP just to Google for fixes for his "modern and new" 2015 Linux install? Yep, its soo ready for the desktop ha ha ha ha! Been saying for years, if you don' t demand better, hold asshat devs like Poettering's feet to the fire? Then you deserve the half baked mess that you get. No wonder The Hairyfeet Challenge is celebrating its eighth year unbeaten!

As for TFA....how are the MTBF for 3D NAND? Did they manage to lick the "controller fails and takes out the drive" issue? Because while the speed of SSD is great one thing that royally blows ass is how you get fuck and all for warning before they shit themselves and die. I'm sure some jackhole will pop up with some anecdote (while neglecting to mention he dropped the thing) about "his HDD just died" but since I've done more HDD replaces than many here have had home cooked meals and by and large? You get plenty of warning with HDDs. You get write errors, you get noise, stutters, they will usually give you enough time to get your data off...not SSDs, I thought Intel had the right idea by giving them a finite lifespan but on that big SSD shootout the Intel one did the "no BIOS/UEFI" brick bit just like the rest.

I mean as much money as they are spending increasing size, is it too much to ask to have a little "failover" chip that just leaves the drive in a read only state so you can get your stuff off if it shits the bed?

Comment: Should have been spelled out in the contract (Score 1) 83

by GPS Pilot (#49350961) Attached to: GAO Denied Access To Webb Telescope Workers By Northrop Grumman

If the customer (the U.S. government) wants its auditors to be able to question individual employees, that should be clearly stipulated in the contract, and then the contractor should have no qualms about meeting the terms of that stipulation.

Lesson learned for how to draw up future contracts, I guess.

You are false data.

Working...