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Comment: Re:News flash for you (Score 1) 132

by K. S. Kyosuke (#48025893) Attached to: CEO of Spyware Maker Arrested For Enabling Stalkers
How is this different from an American going to a foreign country, buying a stuff that's perfectly legal over there, and illegally importing it back to the US? Is the seller at fault here? Your examples feel quite contrived to me - by your logic, people offering software with strong crypto to download are wanted criminals in countries where strong crypto is illegal unless they do everything they can to prevent people from those countries from downloading it.

Comment: Re:News flash for you (Score 1) 132

by gnasher719 (#48025841) Attached to: CEO of Spyware Maker Arrested For Enabling Stalkers

If you set foot in a country, they can arrest you for violating their laws. Doesn't matter if you aren't a citizen and live overseas. If you come there, they can arrest you. So let's say you regularly trash Islam and the Ayatollah and are well known for this. Then you travel to Iran. They very well can arrest you for that. They can't do much if you don't go there but if you show up, they can grab you.

Actually, most countries will prosecute you only for things you did in that country (including things that take effect in the country), with very few exceptions, and I have no reason to believe that Iran would be different.

Comment: Re:Time to retire bash! (Score 1) 316

by K. S. Kyosuke (#48025825) Attached to: Bash To Require Further Patching, As More Shellshock Holes Found

And, pray tell, how is that relevant for the demonstration of a fact that it already has been done twenty years ago (as a subject of serious research, in fact)? Where do you see me "recommending something"? I strongly suggest that you read things before replying.

(BTW, the latest commit is four days old.)

Comment: Re:Referendum at sea (Score 1) 197

but simply building a peaceful house, there is no fighting...

That's invasion or illegal landing of an illegal immigrant. If someone tried dropping (say) a Mexican on an island off the coast of America, you'd count that as an illegal immigrant being landed, which would result in the arrest of the landed person and the seizure of the vessel assisting the illegal immigrant.

Your thought experiment isn't well thought out. Try running it again in the Great Salt Lake, as I said up-thread. The Kara Sea is surrounded by Russian-occupied islands. Everything in it is as Russian as any islands in the Great Salt Lake are American.

Comment: Re:Time for a new date (Score 1) 197

I work in exploration of the continental slopes (there's a damned good reason for my vessel to have holds capable of carrying 3km of riser pressure-rated to 20kpsi). It's on-going. Unfortunately the costs are much higher than for exploring, developing and producing in shallow water, which is why only the highest-quality prospects are worth developing.

Unless you believe Tom Gold (which would get you laughed out of any board room with a geologist in it), you need sediment in considerable quantities to generate significant quantities of hydrocarbons (note below). After which, looking at your hypsographic curve you'll see that the 5km water depth contour (OK, "isobath") encompasses something slightly less than 5% of the Earth's surface while the average depth of the oceans is 3800m.

And now you know why the commercial vessel I work on (one of 4 sister ships, built to the same basic design) has space for 3km of marine riser, and the largest vessels on the slipways of China only carry 5km of riser.

Some early explorations were discouraging, but MOST exploration is discouraging.

In intensely planned remote area deep water offshore exploration, the discovery rate is about one well in three.

I was discussing a previous well with another vessel's weather forecaster (that'll tell you which region we were in) who informed me that core was brought to the surface on three occasions which was oozing with oil; my geological sources refused to comment (quite correctly) several years later when I quizzed them about it, which I take as confirmation. A discovery! Yes. The prospect and regional license was abandoned. The discovery wasn't big enough to have a chance of repaying the billion dollars poured into finding it.

Welcome to offshore exploration.

The Internet

Analyzing Silk Road 2.0 9

Posted by Soulskill
from the welcome-to-narcoanalytics dept.
An anonymous reader writes: After a recent article about breaking the CAPTCHA on the latest incarnation of Silk Road (the darknet-enabled drug market place), Darryl Lau decided to investigate exactly what narcotics people were buying and selling online. He found roughly 13,000 separate listings. Some sellers identify the country they're in, and the top six are the U.S., Australia, England, Germany, and the Netherlands, and Canada. The site also has a bunch of product reviews. If you assume that each review comes from a sale, and multiply that by the listed prices, reviewed items alone represent $20 million worth of business. Lau also has some interesting charts, graphs, and assorted stats. MDMA is the most listed and reviewed drug, and sellers are offering it in quantities of up to a kilogram at a time. The average price for the top 1000 items is $236. Prescription drugs represent a huge portion of the total listings, though no individual prescription drugs have high volume on their own.

Comment: Re:Best outcome (Score 1) 197

I've lived in a place where I don't need a car for longer than Slashdot has existed - by a factor of over three.

You'll note that it doesn't stop me from having access to the internet. You might also note that I don't live in New York, another place where a car is more of a hindrance than a help. (Same for pretty much any city founded before 1900, and most cities founded afterwards.)

+ - Analyzing Silk Road 2.0->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "After a recent article about breaking the CAPTCHA on the latest incarnation of Silk Road (the darknet-enabled drug market place), Darryl Lau decided to investigate exactly what narcotics people were buying and selling online. He found roughly 13,000 separate listings. Some sellers identify the country they're in, and the top six are the U.S., Australia, England, Germany, and the Netherlands, and Canada. The site also has a bunch of product reviews. If you assume that each review comes from a sale, and multiply that by the listed prices, reviewed items alone represent $20 million worth of business. Lau also has some interesting charts, graphs, and assorted stats. MDMA is the most listed and reviewed drug, and sellers are offering it in quantities of up to a kilogram at a time. The average price for the top 1000 items is $236. Prescription drugs represent a huge portion of the total listings, though no individual prescription drugs have high volume on their own."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:It's true (Score 1) 230

by Tom (#48025463) Attached to: Former GM Product Czar: Tesla a "Fringe Brand"

IF they can mass produce a model in a reasonable price range comparable to a modern model of car it will take off.

I'm quite sure they (Ferrari) could, if they wanted. But it would destroy the brand. These brands are built on exclusivity, on the "not for everyone" factor - not only due to prices, but also due to the type of car they built. I'm quite certain that almost everyone who actually owns a Ferrari also owns at least one other car, for everyday driving.

Tesla, on the other hand, is trying to become upperclass mainstream. I wouldn't compare it to Ferrari, but to fashion designers - their original creations are unique exclusives, but they can inspire collections that are affordable to the average girl.

Comment: Re:No he didn't (Score 4, Insightful) 123

by Tom (#48025443) Attached to: Man Walks Past Security Screening Staring At iPad Causing Airport Evacuation

He did cause the delay.

"User errors are user interface errors."

Last line of a keynote speech I gave two years ago. If someone walking back through that exit is so serious that it causes this, then it should not be possible, period.

It's easy to prevent. You post a security guard there, and/or you use appropriate doors. The last is a bit tricky due to large passenger volume and baggage, but some airports I know have these doors just before the baggage pickup area, for example.

He didn't cause the delay. If you build systems for normal users, you have to expect them to make errors, and the system has to catch those errors and handle them in a non-fatal way. If it doesn't, your system is broken.

+ - How tech is transforming teaching in a South African township->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The founders of the African School for Excellence have an ambitious goal — nothing less than redefining low cost, scaleaable teaching that brings international standards to the poorest schools in Africa. And their first model school is off to a good start: in just 18 months, all grade 9 students are achieving more than 50% pass rates the Cambridge Curriculum and only one scored less than that in maths. The national average score in maths is 14%. The school relies on technology to and a locally designed piece of marking software to function, but its foundation is committed, innovative teachers who just use the tech to spread themselves further — teacher:pupil ratios are high, but when they need it learners get a lot of one-on-one support.
What's most remarkable is that the school's running costs are already half the cost of a traditional government school, and the quality of education much, much better. And they're only a year and a half in."

Link to Original Source
Security

FBI Plans To Open Up Malware Analysis Tool To Outside Researchers 8

Posted by Soulskill
from the definitely-totally-detects-fbi-malware-totally-definitely dept.
Trailrunner7 writes: The FBI has developed an internal malware-analysis tool, somewhat akin to the systems used by antimalware companies, and plans to open the system up to external security researchers, academics and others. The system is known as Malware Investigator and is designed to allow FBI agents and other authorized law enforcement users to upload suspicious files. Once a file is uploaded, the system runs it through a cluster of antimalware engines, somewhat akin to the way that Virus Total handles submissions, and returns a wide variety of information about the file.

Users can see what the detection rate is among AV engines, network connection attempts, whether the file has been seen by the system before, destination and source IP addresses and what protocols it uses.Right now, Malware Investigator is able to analyze Windows executables, PDFs and other common file types. But Burns said that the bureau is hoping to expand the portal's reach in the near future. "We are going to be doing dynamic analysis of Android files, with an eye toward other operating systems and executables soon," he said.

...when fits of creativity run strong, more than one programmer or writer has been known to abandon the desktop for the more spacious floor. - Fred Brooks, Jr.

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