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Submission + - CNN and CBC Sued For Pirating YouTube Video (torrentfreak.com)

vivaoporto writes: CNN and Canada's CBC are being sued after the companies allegedly ripped the "Buffalo Lake Effect" from YouTube and used it in their broadcasts without a license. In addition to claims of copyright infringement, the media giants face allegations that they breached the anti-circumvention measures of the DMCA.

New York resident Alfonzo Cutaia (an intelectual property attorney) sensed last year that he had a hit video on his hands and used the YouTube's account monetization program to generate some revenue.

The attorney uploaded his footage to the video site and selected "Standard YouTube License" that grants Youtube (and Youtube only) "a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free, sublicenseable and transferable license to use, reproduce, distribute, prepare derivative works of, display, and perform the Content in connection with the Service and YouTube's (and its successors' and affiliates') business". All other rights are reserved to the copyright owner and standard copyright laws and exceptions apply.

According to a lawsuit filed this week by Cutaia in a New York court, around November 18 Canada’s CBC aired the video online without permission, with a CBC logo as an overlay.

After complaining to CBC about continued unauthorized use, last month Cutaia was told by CBC that the company had obtained the video from CNN on a 10-day license. However, Cutaia claims that the video was used by CBC and its partners for many months, having been supplied to them by CNN who also did not have a license. CBC and CNN are also accused of distributing the video despite knowing that the copyright management information had been removed.

Submission + - Google Research: Real-Time, Super-Accurate Pedestrian Detection Has Arrived (theplatform.net)

An anonymous reader writes: While a great deal of the existing research and practice of pedestrian detection happens on the GPU already, the goal of Google Research was to finally couple the speed with accuracy—a difficult task, according to the Google Research team. There are other approaches that provide a real-time solution on the GPU but in doing so, have not achieved accuracy targets (in this real-time approach there was a miss rate of 42% on the Caltech pedestrian detection benchmark). Another approach called the VeryFast method can run at 100 frames per second (compared to the Google team’s 15) but the miss rate is even greater. Others that emphasize accuracy, even with GPU acceleration, are up to 195 times slower.

Submission + - Apple patent monkeywrenches Facebook plans (cbsnews.com)

bizwriter writes: A new patent awarded to Apple has the potential of locking Facebook out of an important area of growth: using credits to acquire such "media items" as songs, videos, images, e-books and podcasts. The definition of "digital asset" also raises questions of whether Zynga's virtual goods — the mainstay of its revenue — would also fall under this patent. Even payment systems like Bitcoin could run into trouble.

Submission + - Why Is China Building Gigantic Structures In the M (gizmodo.com)

cornholed writes:

New photos have appeared in Google Maps showing unidentified titanic structures in the middle of the Chinese desert. The first one is an intricate network of what appears to be huge metallic stripes, the second structure seems to be some kind of giant targeting grid, and the third one consists of thousand of lines intersecting in a titanic grid that is about 18 miles long.


Submission + - Apple Patents "Slide to Unlock" (zdnet.com) 1

bhagwad writes: "In another case of patent madness, Apple now has exclusive rights to the ubiquitous "slide to unlock" feature found on a huge number of smartphones. Should Apple have been able to patent this in the first place, and what will happen now?"

Submission + - Apple goes rotten again (techdirt.com) 1

E IS mC(Square) writes: Apple has apparently sent a cease and desist to a small cafe in Germany, Apfelkind, whose logo looks absolutely nothing like Apple's. Logo comparison can be found at http://imgur.com/nXwg0.

Call me a hater, but I just wish somebody puts Apple in it's place. Enough of this bullshit.

Submission + - Direct the Patent Office to Cease Issuing Software (whitehouse.gov)

An anonymous reader writes: The patent office's original interpretation of software as language and therefor patentable is much closer to reality and more productive for innovation than it's current practice of issuing software patents with no understanding of the patents being issued.

Under the patent office's current activity, patents have been come a way to stifle innovation and prevent competition rather than supporting innovation and competitive markets. They've become a tool of antitrust employed by large companies against small ones.

To return sanity to the software industry — one of the few industries still going strong in America — direct the patent office to cease issuing software patents and to void all previously issued software patents.


Submission + - NETFLIX for linux within 12 month (omgubuntu.co.uk)

jansaell writes: "The news come via Benjamin Kerensa who, at this years Open Source Convention 2011 (OSCON), spent some time with a couple of engineers from Netflix.

“when I called Netflix out for not having a solution to make Netflix Instant work on all Linux systems they told me that in fact Netflix has some engineers working on a proprietary client for Linux that should be available in the next 12 months.” Ben writes on his blog.

“The engineers from Netflix were hardcore Linux users themselves and advocates of Open Source and shared my frustration that Netflix had not made headway a lot sooner. They indicated that although work is underway it is not a priority project which is why it may take up to 12 months. For obvious reasons (non-disclosure agreements etc.)"


Submission + - China demands Chevy Volt's IP to approve subsidies (greencarreports.com) 1

thecarchik writes: GM wants to put its Chevrolet Volt range-extended electric car on sale in China toward the end of the year. China requires GM to hand over the intellectual property behind at least some of the Volt's technology to a Chinese company to qualify for generous incentives. The 2012 Chevrolet Volt will be the very first electric or plug-in vehicle built outside China to be sold in noticeable numbers in the country.

Last spring, the rules were changed for the country's "New Energy Vehicle Development Plan" to give generous incentives only to high-fuel-efficiency and plug-in cars that are built in China. It covers battery electric cars, plug-in hybrids, and hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles, but not hybrids. To qualify for the incentives, a Chinese-owned firm must own the intellectual property rights and have "mastery" of one of the qualifying vehicle's three key components: the electric motor, battery pack, or power electronics


Submission + - Android to overtake Apple in app downloads! (blogspot.com)

quantr writes: ""Android is expected to surpass Apple in application downloads for the first time, according to research firm Ovum.
Android could notch 8.1 billion app downloads this year, compared with 6 billion for Apple's iOS devices. That marks an explosion of growth for both platforms; Apple had 2.7 billion downloads and Android recorded 1.4 billion last year. The total number of application downloads is expected to grow by 144 percent this year, Ovum said in a report issued today.""


Submission + - How the new 'Protecting Children' bill puts you at (zdnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. House of Representatives is currently considering H.R. 1981, a bill that would order all of our online service providers to keep new logs about our online activities, logs to help the government identify the web sites we visit and the content we post online. This sweeping new "mandatory data retention" proposal treats every Internet user like a potential criminal and represents a clear and present danger to the online free speech and privacy rights of millions of innocent Americans.

I have a theory that it's impossible to prove anything, but I can't prove it.