Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Don't take airplanes piloted by the Malays (Score 1) 241

by amorsen (#48686133) Attached to: AirAsia Flight Goes Missing Between Indonesia and SIngapore

You just said bollocks and repeated my point: it was not a shoulder fired missile that any guerilla soldier can get, it was a SAM system previously only available to nation states.

Conflict zones are not out of bound of civilian traffic in general; have a look at a map and see how that would make a lot of routes impossible.

Comment: Re:Don't take airplanes piloted by the Malays (Score 1) 241

by amorsen (#48684125) Attached to: AirAsia Flight Goes Missing Between Indonesia and SIngapore

He was authorized to be flying there. Planes fly over conflict zones all the time, because non-idiots know the difference between civilian airliners and military planes, and no-one gives SAMs worth millions of dollars to imbeciles, and the cheap ones cannot fly 10km.

As it turns out, that was no-one except Vladimir Putin, so now the game has changed.

Comment: Re:uh - by design? (Score 2) 163

by amorsen (#48663009) Attached to: Thunderbolt Rootkit Vector

USB 3.0 has this exact same feature (DMA), so yes, yes you should expect a USB thumb drive to be able to do this.

Ethernet controllers work by DMA, yet they do not offer random access to anyone who plugs anything into the bus. There is no inherent reason why DMA means full access.

Thunderbolt and Firewire are different, in that they are "controllerless". They are simply PCI bridges.

Comment: Re:Fundamental failure of process design (Score 4, Informative) 212

by amorsen (#48646083) Attached to: Cyberattack On German Steel Factory Causes 'Massive Damage'

That is pretty much how industry works. There is a right way to shut down a plant, and it involves a lot of things done in the right order. You can do an emergency shut down, and that will not kill anyone, but you will at minimum have to throw a lot of the stuff away that was going through the plant at the time.

Steel works are about a worst-case example of this. Lose power at the wrong time and you have no-longer-melted steel stuck in all the wrong places with no way to remove it. Removing this risk is impossible.

Comment: Re:What took them so long? (Score 1) 212

by amorsen (#48646061) Attached to: Cyberattack On German Steel Factory Causes 'Massive Damage'

Moreover, if they do exist they should be wholly insulated from the Internet

Systems which are insulated from the Internet rarely get security updates and security reviews often miss them. Yet all it takes is a compromised laptop on the wrong network or a USB stick inserted into the wrong machine, and suddenly the whole "secure" network is up for the taking.

Critical systems should be designed to function despite FSB, Mossad, and the NSA all have having direct access to every LAN. Alas, that is practically impossible to achieve today, industrial systems and management functions do not have the necessary security features to work in such an environment.

Comment: Re:More Tesla lies..... (Score 1) 133

by amorsen (#48640911) Attached to: Tesla About To Start Battery-Swap Pilot Program

Show me a car that gets 6l/100km *and* has an 80l gas tank and I'll sell you a bridge.

I know it is cheating, but you can fairly easily do 1000 miles per tank in a modern diesel, as long as you stay below 60mph or so and avoid cities. I did around 40l for around 1200km over a couple of weeks in a rented BMW.

Comment: Re:I blame Microsoft (Score 1) 148

by amorsen (#48632005) Attached to: Critical Git Security Vulnerability Announced

do you feel it's a good thing for something.dat and Something.dat to reference two different files? Because that would never confuse users, right?

Case sensitivity is locale-dependent. If the user is bilingual, the file system then has to guess which language the user is thinking in when opening files.

Comment: Re:Why not push toward collapse? (Score 1) 435

by amorsen (#48621263) Attached to: In Breakthrough, US and Cuba To Resume Diplomatic Relations

They were a truly great people and culture who were light years ahead of this disgusting and degenerate "progressive"/Jewish multiculturalist tyranny we find ourselves subjected to.

You missed the memo. You people are supposed to be on the Jewish side against Islam now.

Comment: Re:Why not push toward collapse? (Score 3, Informative) 435

by amorsen (#48619129) Attached to: In Breakthrough, US and Cuba To Resume Diplomatic Relations

Well, Iraq was pushed to collapse. That did not go so well. Syria was pushed to collapse. Not ideal either.

Burma/Myanmar was not pushed to collapse, and instead relations were softened. That is going fairly well.

I am not sure the push-to-collapse strategy has any successes to its name. Well possibly Germany 1945.

Comment: Re:Sad that the far left screws this up. (Score 1) 401

by amorsen (#48595539) Attached to: The Shale Boom Won't Stop Climate Change; It Could Make It Worse

A nuclear reactor has a life span in decades, and needs more than a decade to pay itself back. There is no way anyone is going to make that investment when the business case involves something as speculative as tar sand. Tar sand is barely profitable now, who knows what it will be like in 2 or 5 years, never mind the 20+ you need to justify building a reactor.

Don't sweat it -- it's only ones and zeros. -- P. Skelly

Working...