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Submission + - Sourceforge staff takes over a user's account and wraps their software installer ( 11

An anonymous reader writes: Sourceforge staff took over the account of the GIMP-for-Windows maintainer claiming it was abandoned and used this opportunity to wrap the installer in crapware. Quoting Ars:

SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.

Submission + - Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa (

Barryke writes: Verizon has blamed Netflix for the streaming slowdowns their customers have been seeing. It seems the Verizon ">blog post defending this has backfired in a spectacular way: The chief has clearly admitted that Verizon has capacity to spare, and is deliberately constraining capacity from network providers. The Level3 blog posted in reply to Verizon show a diagram visualising underpowered interconnect problem, and offer a free upgrade for Verizon hardware: the interconnect network cables and ports to plug them in. "(..) these cards are very cheap, a few thousand dollars for each 10 Gbps card which could support 5,000 streams or more. If that’s the case, we’ll buy one for them. Maybe they can’t afford the small piece of cable between our two ports. If that’s the case, we’ll provide it. Heck, we’ll even install it." It seems there isn't much more to say, although i am very curious to the response of the ISP about this straight forward accusation of throttling paying users.

Submission + - Proposals to End EU Roaming Charges Ready 'Before Summer' (

DavidGilbert99 writes: Neelie Kroes — the EU's top telecoms regulator — is planning radical reform of how mobile networks charge customers roaming within the EU, promising to eradicate roaming charges completely, as well as ensuring a free and open internet for all. The International Business Time UK has been told details of these proposals will likely be presented to the European Commission within the next month, with Kroes looking to get the legislation passed by Easter 2014, ahead of next May's EU elections.

Submission + - Monju nuclear plant operator ordered to stop restart preparation

AmiMoJo writes: Japan's nuclear regulator has ordered the operator of the Monju fast-breeder reactor to suspend preparation for its restart until measures are put in place for its proper maintenance and management. The regulators acted after finding the operator had missed checkups on about 10,000 pieces of equipment. They ordered that sufficient manpower and funds be allocated for maintenance and management.

The reactor in Tsuruga City, central Japan, is at the center of the nation's nuclear-fuel recycling policy. But its operator has been hampered by a series of problems.

Submission + - Boxed copies of Windows 8 Pro do not work for clean installs

excatholica writes: After confusion at the Australian Windows 8 launch, a boxed copy of Windows 8 Pro was purchased to see if it would work for clean installs.
Microsoft has confused retail resellers on the pricing and availability of its Windows 8 operating system, providing no specific details despite a major licensing change.

The company told attendees of its launch event in Sydney on Friday 26th October that it would only sell upgrades of the software in retail stores — no boxed copies of the full OS would be available.

However some retailers said they were “definitely” selling full boxed versions of the software in their stores.

But when the magazine bought a copy and tested it, the results did not bear this out...

Submission + - Manning's lawyer motions for "unlawful pretrial punishment" (

zapyon writes: The 100+ pages of the motion describe in detail the torture-like treatment of the suspect. — Can a trial be just, could any "confession" be trusted after such treatment?

The question for future whistle-blower remains: how to sound up without getting caught and treated like this unlucky man.


Submission + - Arrested Man Sues Under Anti-Slavery Amendment (

OopsIDied writes: Finbar McGarry is suing the state of Vermont for $11 million after being forced to work washing other inmates' laundry at 25 cents an hour while being held for trial. McGarry claims that prison officers threatened to place him in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day if he refused to work. McGarry was eventually tried, and his charges were dropped.

Submission + - Brazilian telephony operator TIM drops calls on purpose (

An anonymous reader writes: A recently produced report by the Brazilian Telecommunications Regulatory Agency (ANATEL) confirms what many clients — myself included — have long suspected, TIM disconnects its customer calls on purpose. TIM offers voice plans charged either by minute or by call, the latter appeals to a larger audience because one call, regardless of its duration, costs only 25 cents even if it's long distance. However the report discovered that these calls have a drop rate 300% higher than those charged by minute which strongly suggests that they are disconnected on purpose, to maximize profits. More details (in Portuguese) here:

Submission + - Senate approves indefinite detention and torture of Americans (

Artem Tashkinov writes: The terrifying legislation that allows for Americans to be arrested, detained indefinitely, tortured and interrogated — without charge or trial — passed through the Senate on Thursday with an overwhelming support from 93 percent of lawmakers. Only seven members of the US Senate voted against the National Defense Authorization Act on Thursday, despite urging from the ACLU and concerned citizens across the country that the affects of the legislation would be detrimental to the civil rights and liberties of everyone in America. Under the bill, Americans can be held by the US military for terrorism-related charges and detained without trial indefinitely.

Submission + - Nouveau Open-Source NVIDIA Driver Achieves OpenCL Support (

An anonymous reader writes: The Nouveau driver project that's been writing an open-source NVIDIA graphics driver via reverse-engineering has moved forward in their support. The Nouveau driver now has OpenCL acceleration support to do GPGPU computing on the open-source community driver for several generations of GeForce GPUs.
The Media

Submission + - Some Wikileaks Contributions to Public Discourse 3

Hugh Pickens writes: "EFF reports that regardless of the heated debate over the propriety of Wikileaks actions, some of the cables have contributed significantly to public and political conversations around the world. The Guardian reported on a cable describing an incident in Afghanistan in which employees of DynCorp, a US military contractor, hired a "dancing boy," an underaged boy dressed as women, who dance for gatherings of men and is then prostituted — an incident that contributed important information to the debate over the use of private military contractors. A cable released by Wikileaks showed that Pfizer allegedly sought to blackmail a Nigerian regulator to stop a lawsuit against drug trials on children. A Wikileaks revelation that the United States used bullying tactics to attempt to push Spain into adopting copyright laws even more stringent than those in the US came just in time to save Spain from the kind of misguided copyright laws that cripple innovation and facilitate online censorship. An article by the New York Times analyzed cables released which indicated the US is having difficulties in fulfilling Obama's promise to close the Guantánamo Bay detention camp and is now considering incentives in return for accepting detainees, including a one-on-one meeting with Obama or assistance obtaining IMF assistance. "These examples make clear that Wikileaks has brought much-needed light to government operations and private actions," writes Rainey Reitman, "which, while veiled in secrecy, profoundly affect the lives of people around the world and can play an important role in a democracy that chooses its leaders.""
The Internet

Submission + - SPAM: Redirecting DNS requests can harm the Internet

alphadogg writes: ICANN this week has condemned the practice of redirecting Internet users to a third-party Web site or portal when they misspell a Web address and type a domain name that does not exist. Rather than return an error message for DNS requests for nonexistent domains, some DNS operators send back the IP address of another domain, a process known as NXDOMAIN substitution. The target address is often a Web portal or information site. Handling DNS requests this way has a number drawbacks that could lead to the Internet not working properly, according to ICANN. Redirection sites are prime targets for attacks by hackers that want to send users to their own servers.
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