Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: No Linux Support? (Score 4, Informative) 427

by alphan (#29109467) Attached to: Sony Announces PS3 Slim, Price Cut, Improvements To Home

"Removal of 'Install Other OS' feature

The new PS3 system will focus on delivering games and other entertainment content, and users will not be able to install other Operating Systems to the new PS3 system."
http://www.scee.presscentre.com/Content/Detail.asp?ReleaseID=4842&NewsAreaID=2

Sony abandoning Linux on new skus means they are effectively doing the same for the old ones.

Epic failure.

PlayStation (Games)

Sony Announces PS3 Slim, Price Cut, Improvements To Home 427

Posted by Soulskill
from the worst-kept-secret dept.
Sony's press conference today at the Gamescom convention was full of announcements. They officially revealed the PS3 Slim, which will be 36% lighter and 33% smaller than the normal PS3. It will come with a 120 GB hard drive and list for $299 when it hits retail stores in early September. Normal PS3s will drop to that price as well starting tomorrow. (Unfortunately for Sony, their unveiling was spoiled a bit by several retailers jumping the gun on new advertisements, not to mention the rumors that had been swirling for weeks ahead of time.) Sony also announced a PS3 firmware update as well as new features and customization options for Home. In addition to that, the PS3 and PSP will be getting a digital reader service. At launch it will bring access to Marvel comic books, and will expand from there. They didn't talk much about their upcoming motion control scheme, but promised more details next month at the Tokyo Game Show.
PlayStation (Games)

+ - PS3 Price drop and PS3 Slim Announced

Submitted by
mkiiina
mkiiina writes "Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few months you have heard some of the rumors about the possibility of a new PS3 Slim and a possible price drop. Ars Technica's mole had hinted that these things would come to pass in August or September and today in Cologne Germany, the worst kept secret was officially confirmed. New PS3 Slim (80 GB) $299 and an immediate (8/19) price drop on current 80 GB PS3's on shelves. The 160 GB units will retail for $399, more than likely in a bundled form. http://content.usatoday.com/communities/gamehunters/post/2009/08/sony-playstation-3-price-cut-/1"
PlayStation (Games)

+ - PS3 Slim

Submitted by
solarmist
solarmist writes "This morning at the GDC Sony officially revealed the PS3 slim at the lower price of $300 in the US, 300 euros in Europe, or 29980 yen in Japan available from September 1st. I don't know about you, but this is what I've been waiting for. I'm going to actually pick one up now."
Programming

+ - Open Source Television->

Submitted by jonniee
jonniee (1271482) writes "The Neuros LINK is essential a quiet x86 PC running Ubuntu Linux with an ATI graphics card delivering video via VGA, DVI, and HDMI output. What makes the LINK such a compelling platform for these folks and Linux/open source developers in general is the recognition that a real business entity is stepping forward to spend the money necessary to market and commercialize what tech enthusiasts have been doing for years."
Link to Original Source
Businesses

+ - Are Information Technology's Glory Days Over?

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens
Hugh Pickens writes "The NY Times reports that computer science students with the entrepreneurial spirit may want to look for a different major because if Thomas M. Siebel, founder of Siebel Systems, is right, IT is a mature industry that will grow no faster than the larger economy, its glory days long past, having ended in 2000. Addressing Stanford students in February as a guest of the engineering school, Siebel called attention to 20 sweet years, from 1980 to 2000, when, he said, worldwide IT spending grew at a compounded annual growth rate of 17 percent. "All you had to do was show up and not goof it up," Siebel says. "All ships were rising." Since 2000, however, that rate has averaged only 3 percent, Siebel says. Siebel's explanation for the sharp decline is that "the promise of the post-industrial society has been realized." Three successive inventions — the mini-computer, the PC, and then the Internet — were essentially "total market takeover" products, each wiping out the market for the product before it. No new technological advances, Siebel believes, will impel IT customers to replace the computer technology they now have: "I would suggest to you that most of what's going on today is not very exciting." In Siebel's view, far larger opportunities are to be found in businesses that address needs in food, water, health care and energy. Though Silicon Valley was "where the action was" when he finished graduate school, he says, "if I were graduating today, I would get on a boat and I would get off in Shanghai.""
Displays

Linux-Friendly, Internet-Enabled HDTVs? 277

Posted by timothy
from the for-the-well-equipped-hermit-cave dept.
mrchaotica writes "I'm in the market for a new HDTV (in the $1200-or-slightly-more range, as I won the extended-service-plan lottery and have a Sears store credit). Several of the TVs I've looked at have various 'Internet TV' features (here are Samsung's and Panasonic's). Some manufacturers appear to be rolling their own, while others are partnering with Yahoo (maybe in an attempt to create a 'standard?'). Moreover, these TVs also tend to run Linux under the hood (although their GPL compliance, such as in Panasonic's case, may leave something to be desired). Finally, it's easy to imagine these TVs being able to support video streaming services (YouTube, Netflix, Amazon, etc.) without a set-top box, but I don't know the extent to which that support actually exists. Here are my questions: 1) Is this 'Internet TV' thing going to be a big deal going forward, or just a gimmick? 2) Which manufacturers are most [open standard|Linux|hacker]-friendly? 3) Which TV models have the best support (or best potential and community backing) for this sort of thing?"
Power

+ - Printable batteries set to arrive by 2010

Submitted by FullBandwidth
FullBandwidth (1445095) writes "Paper-thin batteries that can be printed onto greeting cards or other flexible substrates have been demonstrated at Fraunhofer Research Institution for Electronic Nano Systems in Germany. The batteries have a relatively short life span, as the anode and cathode materials dissipate over time. However, they contain no hazardous materials."
PC Games (Games)

Games That Design Themselves 162

Posted by Soulskill
from the real-time-savers dept.
destinyland writes "MIT's Media Lab is building 'a game that designs its own AI agents by observing the behavior of humans.' Their ultimate goal? 'Collective AI-driven agents that can interact and converse with humans without requiring programming or specialists to hand-craft behavior and dialogue.' With a similar project underway by a University of California professor, we may soon see radically different games that can 'react with human-like adaptability to whatever situation they're thrust into.'"
Biotech

New Treatment Trains Immune System To Kill Cancer 62

Posted by kdawson
from the going-after-the-root dept.
Al writes "A vaccine in clinical trials at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine triggers the human immune system to attack a faulty protein that's often abundant in colorectal cancer tissue and precancerous tissue. If it works as hoped, it could remove the need for repeated colonoscopies in patients at high risk for developing colorectal cancer. The vaccine has already proven safe in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. It works by spurring the body to manufacture antibodies against the abnormal version of a mucous protein called MUC1. While moderate amounts of the protein are found in the lining of normal intestines, high levels of a defective form of MUC1 are present in about half of advanced adenomas and the majority of colorectal cancers."
The Almighty Buck

Stock Market Manipulation By Millisecond Trading 624

Posted by kdawson
from the other-people's-money dept.
cfa22 writes "Nice piece in the NY Times today on ultra-fast trading on the NYSE and other markets. The 'algos' that make autonomous trading decisions have to be fast, but I wonder: Is network speed ever a bottleneck? Can anyone with inside experience with millisecond trading provide some details for the curious among us regarding hardware architectures and networking used for such trading systems?" According to the article, high-frequency traders generated about $21 billion in profits last year.
Displays

+ - Scientists turn used LCDs into medicine->

Submitted by schliz
schliz (994115) writes "Scientists from the University of York have come up with a new recycling technique that extracts PVA from used LCD panels to create a "a bioactive sponge". The technique could allow recovered PVA to be used in pills, wound dressings and tissue scaffolds that aid human tissue regeneration. It could also keep waste LCD screens from incineration or landfill altogether."
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - ID Scanning Declared Violation of BC Privacy Laws

Submitted by AnonymousIslander
AnonymousIslander (1603121) writes "The Information and Privacy Comissioner for the Province of British Columbia, David Loukedelis, has ruled that electronic scanning of driver's licences (and similar forms of ID) as a condition of entering a bar or nightclub is a violation of BC's Personal Information Privacy Act. The decision, while dealing with one specific club, will still have ramifications across the entire province. It is unknown if the nightclub in question will attempt to appeal the decision in court. A similar decision was reached last year in Alberta.

The system in question is known as BarWatch, and has been the target of criticism by many for a number of years. Despite this, a number of bars/nightclubs and restaurants in communities across Canada have installed similar systems, and just days before this decision came down there were calls for the expansion of BarWatch in Victoria to cover restaurants and other establishments serving the post-bar crowds."

Premature optimization is the root of all evil. -- D.E. Knuth

Working...