Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Better them than us (Score 1) 170

by alphacow (#37060330) Attached to: Browser Wars Redux: This Time It's the Apps
It makes a lot more sense for browser makers (which, by my last count, consist mainly of four or so major vendors... FF, Chrome, Safari, and IE) to have to keep up with novel web standards than for web developers (10,000? 50,000? 100,000?) to have to keep up with browser inconsistencies. Sure, there are places where the standards are inconsistent. This sort of shift will force the W3C to move faster to improve the standards, which is good news for everybody.
Education

Google Pulls Plug On Programming For the Masses 236

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the hacking-is-cancelled dept.
theodp writes "Google has decided to pull the plug on Android App Inventor, which was once touted as a game-changer for introductory computer science. In an odd post, Google encourages folks to 'Get Started!' with the very product it's announcing will be discontinued as a Google product. The move leaves CS Prof David Wolber baffled. ' In the case of App Inventor,' writes Wolber, 'the decision affects more than just your typical early adopter techie. It hurts kids and schools, and outfits like Iridescent, who use App Inventor in their Technovation after-school programs for high school girls, and Youth Radio's Mobile Action Lab, which teaches app building to kids in Oakland California. You've hurt professors and K-12 educators who have developed new courses and curricula with App Inventor at the core. You've hurt universities who have redesigned their programs.' Wolber adds: 'Even looking at it from Google's perspective, I find the decision puzzling. App Inventor was a public relations dream. Democratizing app building, empowering kids, women, and underrepresented groups — this is good press for a company continually in the news for anti-trust and other far less appealing issues. And the cost-benefit of the cut was negligible-believe it or not, App Inventor was a small team of just 5+ employees! The Math doesn't make sense.'"
Government

+ - How A US Debt Default Will Affect IT->

Submitted by
jfruhlinger
jfruhlinger writes "As the US Congress plays a game of chicken, American IT needs to start planning for scenarios where the debt ceiling isn't raised. Once the limit has been reached, techies will quickly confront a number of consequences, some immediate (like not getting paid) and some tied to the ripple effects that will roil the economy in case of a default. Sadly, with two economic disasters in the past decade, we've become familiar with economic fallout."
Link to Original Source
Operating Systems

+ - OS X Lion Improves Security->

Submitted by dogmatixpsych
dogmatixpsych (786818) writes "Early reports say that Apple's new Lion OS "has definitively leapfrogged its rivals by offering an operating system with state-of-the-art security protections that make it more resistant to malware exploits and other hack attacks." Some of the enhancements include: full ASLR, tightened web processes, full disk encryption, and built in virtualization."
Link to Original Source

Comment: research money (Score 2) 306

by alphacow (#36815510) Attached to: Can Long Term Research Survive the Coming Age of Austerity?
As a researcher, I think giving to the most elite is a moderately good idea. Reading most of the research that's generated by people like me, you realize it's just PhDs trying their darnedest to ++publicationCount, which is a pretty stupid thing for taxpayer dollars to fund. The major work, more often than not, comes out of well-renown labs, and the students who come out of those labs.

On the other hand, lots of the fundamental knowledge necessary for the "major work" mentioned earlier comes from the incremental work that isn't sexy in its own right, but very necessary nonetheless. No simple answer here.
Security

ImageShack Hacked, Security Groups Threatened 288

Posted by Soulskill
from the a-picture's-worth-a-couple-hundred-words-or-so dept.
revjtanton writes "Last night a group calling themselves 'Anti-Sec' hacked ImageShack, one of the largest image hosting sites on the web, and replaced many of the site's hosted pictures with one of their own, which detailed their manifesto. The group's grievance is against full-disclosure of exploits, an issue that was debated recently after a presentation on an ATM exploit was canceled. Anti-Sec simply wants the practice within security circles to end, and they've promised to cause 'mayhem and destruction' if it doesn't. These people are taking direct aim against a sector of the IT industry that is already armed to fight the ... but they also already know that. It should be interesting to see how this plays out."
Sun Microsystems

Sun Announces New MySQL, Michael Widenius Forks 306

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the this-cracks-me-up dept.
viktor.91 writes "Sun Microsystems announced three new MySQL products: MySQL 5.4, MySQL Cluster 7.0 and MySQL Enterprise Partner Program for 'Remote DBA' service providers." which showed up in the firehose today next to Glyn Moody's submission where he writes "Michael Widenius, founder and original developer of MySQL, says that most of the leading coders for that project have either left Sun or will be leaving in the wake of Oracle's takeover. To ensure MySQL's survival, he wants to fork from the official version — using his company Monty Program Ab to create what he calls a MySQL "Fedora" project. This raises the larger question of who really owns a commercial open software application: the corporate copyright holders, or the community?"
Social Networks

+ - "Facebook = Bad Grades" based on poor rese->

Submitted by alphacow
alphacow (1516741) writes "The wonderful headline put out by Time magazine earlier this month ("What Facebook Users Share: Lower Grades") appears to have been based on some fairly faulty research. While poorly conducted research is nothing new, its interesting to see how the article really describes to the public what you can do with bad research. From the article: "So read another way, the study might just as easily have erroneously concluded that 'Facebook somehow encourages students to seek technical careers rather than humanities interests,' notes Chris Dede, a professor of education at Harvard." Its not too often that the general press actually describes bad research and explains how a poorly conceived study can lead to partly — or completely — false conclusions."
Link to Original Source

A failure will not appear until a unit has passed final inspection.

Working...