Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:that's what happens (Score 1) 123

by almitydave (#49721681) Attached to: Prenda's Old Copyright Trolls Are Suing People Again

That touches on a thought I've often had: if "ignorance of the law is no excuse", then I'd really like to see a physical copy of all the laws by which I'm required to abide - federal, state, and local. I'm sorta surprised no one's played this as a tactic - I would have expected some grandstanding politician to roll out wheelbarrows of paperwork to make a point.

Comment: Re:Amplitude not Height (Score 1) 61

by almitydave (#49649769) Attached to: Subsurface Ocean Waves Can Be More Than 500 Meters High

No. It's height. Wave height = 2 * wave amplitude. Internal waves do not occur at the surface, but they can affect the height of the surface (i.e. you can "see" internal waves on a ship's radar as the changes in sea surface height match the crests/troughs of the waves). Like a surface gravity wave, the main motion/movement of a water particle in an internal wave is circular/orbital, although there is also some along-wave direction movement (Stokes drift).

Also keep in mind that tsunami waves caused by earthquakes are mostly internal, and only become large surface waves when the water becomes shallow, and all that displacement has nowhere to go but up.

Comment: Re:Aren't they called Currents? (Score 1) 61

by almitydave (#49649717) Attached to: Subsurface Ocean Waves Can Be More Than 500 Meters High

Generally when talking about water, the definition of a wave specifies it is on the surface:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wave"a disturbance on the surface of a liquid body, as the sea or a lake, in the form of a moving ridge or swell."

If you are using another definition of the word wave (such as that used by physics to refer to light, sound, etc.) when talking about water, you really should specify what you mean.

It's clear from the article they're using the latter meaning of "wave". The definition above is a visual description of what are generally caused by wind. You want definition 11 in your link.

One unexpected finding ... was the degree of turbulence produced as the waves originate, as tides and currents pass over ridges on the seafloor.

Watch the animation.

Comment: Re:Slow (Score 3, Insightful) 106

by almitydave (#49394403) Attached to: World's First 1 Megawatt All-Electric Race Car

So? It's not an oval racer. It's built to a performance envelope defined by a specific event. The factors that are important here are acceleration, downforce, and mechanical grip; not top speed. Looking at the sketch in TFA, it's clear by the presence of the front wing that they're targeting massive downforce, which eats into top speed by creating drag.

Comment: Re:3 Minutes (Score 4, Insightful) 106

by almitydave (#49394207) Attached to: World's First 1 Megawatt All-Electric Race Car

with 1MW power, the 50KWh battery would be dead in 3 minutes at full throttle.. jeez.
Roughly equivalent to a gasoline car with a 2-gallon tank... lol. (1 gal=33KWh)

Do all these people posting 50kWh/1020kW 180s comments not understand racing? Or hybrid drive systems? Or Mountain roads? As TFA mentions, the Pikes Peak course contains over 150 turns, so you'll be off throttle or at partial throttle most of the time, especially with that much torque available, and regenerative braking will give some of it back.

Or perhaps the race car engineers that are building the race car don't know anything about the race they're building it for. That seems likely. /sarcasm

Don't hit the keys so hard, it hurts.

Working...