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Comment: Re:Greg Egan (Score 1) 1130

by allrong (#40927893) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Most Underappreciated Sci-Fi Writer?

Considering how shallow a lot of modern Australian policy and culture is and how thought provoking many of his books are, this is not a surprise. From what he wrote the only country he's visited other than Australia is Iran, which he chose based upon his interactions with "illegal" refugees from that country, a cause that he is passionate about. Also, I believe that he has consciously decided to be a bit of a recluse. Check out http://gregegan.customer.netspace.net.au/images/GregEgan.htm . I laughed when I read this as at the same time I was mentally scolding my sister for putting too much information about herself on Facebook.

Comment: Terry Dowling (Score 1) 1130

by allrong (#40925235) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Most Underappreciated Sci-Fi Writer?

Terry Dowling's science fiction could be said to verge on the mystical (and I'm a hard sf person myself), but full of amazing ideas and imagery is so intense that you can see his distant future lands. You *know* they exist, that great sandships ply the deserts of an Australia transformed by a resurgent Aboriginal culture, where Nationals are restricted to the coasts, and where artificial and non-human intelligence struggles to survive. I cannot recommend his books highly enough, though as he uses small publishers they can be hard to find. He also writes horror, and again though I'm not generally a fan of the genre, his writing transcends this.

http://www.terrydowling.com/

He's like a function -- he returns a value, in the form of his opinion. It's up to you to cast it into a void or not. -- Phil Lapsley

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