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Comment Personally, I'd go for bio-engineering. (Score 1) 129

It might not be possible, but I'd go for using the sea creatures themselves. A interesting project would be to develop coral that accumulates heavy metals from the water. And then harvest the corals and "replant" them. It would be useful on two different sides. One would be removing toxic materials that might be accumulating because of illegal dumping. And the other is it would be more sustainable while providing jobs for people.

The Next Gold Rush Will Be 5,000 Feet Under the Sea, With Robot Drones (vice.com) 129

merbs writes: In Papua New Guinea, one well-financed, first-mover company is about to pioneer deep sea mining. And that will mean dispatching a fleet of giant remote-operated robotic miners 5,000 feet below the surface to harvest the riches scattered across ocean floor. These mammoth underwater vehicles look like they've been hauled off the set of a sci-fi film—think Avatar meets The Abyss. And they'll be dredging up copper, gold, and other valuable minerals, far beneath the gaze of human eyes.

Tesla: Journalists Trespassed At Gigafactory, Assaulted Employees (teslamotors.com) 328

An anonymous reader writes: Telsa Motors has published a blog post saying that a pair of journalists from the Reno Gazette Journal trespassed on the grounds of the company's new Gigafactory and attacked security workers with their vehicle when confronted. "As the Tesla employee attempted to record the license plate number on the rear bumper, the driver put it in reverse and accelerated into the Tesla employee, knocking him over, causing him to sustain a blow to the left hip, an approximate 2" bleeding laceration to his right forearm, a 3" bleeding laceration to his upper arm, and scrapes on both palms." Officials from the Sheriff's Department arrived shortly after this happened and arrested one of the trespassers for felony assault. The RGJ has a story about the altercation as well, confirming there was an altercation, but also noting, "The newspaper's vehicle was damaged in the altercation. A rock had been used to shatter the driver's-side window and the driver's-side seat belt had been cut in half."

Motorola Marketed the Moto E 2015 On Promise of Updates, Stops After 219 Days 123

An anonymous reader writes: Over the past few years, Motorola has emerged as one of the best manufacturers for low-to-mid-range Android phones. Unlike many other major manufacturers, they keep their version of Android close to stock in order to keep OS updates flowing more easily. When they began marketing the Moto E 2015, updates were one of the features they trumpeted the loudest. But after the company published a list of devices that will continue to get updates, Android Police found the Moto E to be conspicuously absent. The phone launched on February 25, a mere 219 days ago. According to an official Motorola marketing video from launch day, "...we won't forget about you, and we'll make sure your Moto E stays up to date after you buy it."

Comment This should be interesting. (Score 4, Interesting) 114

What happens if, by accident or malicious intent, the storage medium you are using is destroyed? Or ironically enough, if you are attacked with malware that encrypts your drive. How do you explain that you can't decrypt the drive to so they can decrypt your messages? Or that the cloud solution provider you were using is down for a undetermined amount of time?

Northern California Wildfire Destroys American Telephony Museum 68

alphadogg writes: In this day of smartphones, cell towers and wearables, the American Museum of Telephony in the Mountain Ranch community of northern California preserved artifacts of a much different world of communications. But the museum, along with surrounding residences, burnt to the ground late last week during the raging Butte Fire and it's assumed that the collection is largely lost. The operator is vowing to rebuild.
The Internet

Neocities Becomes the First Major Site To Implement the Distributed Web 51

An anonymous reader writes: HTTP has served us well for a long time, but will we continue to use HTTP forever? Since Brewster Kahle called for a distributed web, more people have been experimenting with what is being called the Permanent Web: Web sites that can be federated instantly, and served from trustless peers. Popular web hosting site Neocities has announced that they are the first major site to implement IPFS, which is the leading distributed web protocol, and they published the announcement using IPFS itself.
Operating Systems

Contiki 3.0 Released, Retains Support For Apple II, C64 44

An anonymous reader writes that on Wednesday the Contiki team announced the release of Contiki 3.0, the latest version of the open source IoT operating system. The 3.0 release is a huge step up from the 2.x branch and brings support for new and exciting hardware, a set of new network protocols, a bunch of improvements in the low-power mesh networking protocols, along with a large number of general stability improvements. And, yes, the system still runs on the Commodore 64/128, Apple II, Atari.
Wireless Networking

The Promise of 5G 158

An anonymous reader writes: From instant monitoring of leaking pipelines, to real-time worldwide collaboration, the increase in machine-to-machine communications that 5G allows will change the way we live. This TechCrunch article takes a look at the promise that 5G holds and its possibilities. From the article: "By 2030, 5G will transform and create many uses that we cannot even think of yet. We will live in a world that will have 10-100 times more Internet-connected devices than there are humans. Hundreds of billions of machines will be sensing, processing and transmitting data without direct human control and intervention."

Ubuntu 15.04 Released, First Version To Feature systemd 494

jones_supa writes: The final release of Ubuntu 15.04 is now available. A modest set of improvements are rolling out with this spring's Ubuntu. While this means the OS can't rival the heavy changelogs of releases past, the adage "don't fix what isn't broken" is clearly one 15.04 plays to. The headline change is systemd being featured first time in a stable Ubuntu release, which replaces the inhouse UpStart init system. The Unity desktop version 7.3 receives a handful of small refinements, most of which aim to either fix bugs or correct earlier missteps (for example, application menus can now be set to be always visible). The Linux version is 3.19.3 further patched by Canonical. As usual, the distro comes with fresh versions of various familiar applications.

Comment Interesting double edge sword there. (Score 4, Insightful) 337

I can understand why they might have refused to take the risk. But it hardly seems like a smart idea to allow a country we value to be destabilized over one man. What affects the one, affects us all. If Germany became destabilized due to our childish antics, it wouldn't end well. Best case scenario, the euro zone would collapse. Worst case, nuclear power plants would be pilfered.

Comment Re:Obvious (Score 1) 178

Wallet was hidden in a Mindcraft structure.

This would actually be quite fasinating. Something like that would imply a virtual structure acting as a stenographic hiding place. Which leads to some interesting ideas. I know the whole, "They don't need your computer, they just need a wrench" idea applies here. But just imagine, a hostile entity (FBI, Robbers, ex-wife) are attempting to take your bitcoins. So, to make a plausible case that you don't have access to it, you generate a minecraft world. Then make various structures based on the bitcoin string and then destroy the wallet. If anyone decides to look at your world, you can make the claim you were attempting art. Which would be hard to dispute, since art is subjective.


Kim Dotcom's Lawyer Plays Down Megaupload Worker's Guilty Plea 102

mrspoonsi writes with the latest from Kim Dotcom. "Kim Dotcom's US lawyer has denied that a guilty plea by one of the Megaupload's former employees has major implications for his client's case. Andrus Nomm was sentenced to a year in jail after pleading guilty on Friday to conspiracy to commit copyright infringement while working for the now defunct file-sharing site. The US is currently trying to extradite Mr Dotcom, who founded Megaupload, from New Zealand to stand trial. Mr Dotcom denies wrongdoing. The US Department of Justice (DoJ) has alleged that Megaupload's staff had "operated websites that wilfully reproduced and distributed infringing copies of copyrighted works" over a period of five years, causing more than $400m (£260m) of harm to copyright owners. Nomm — a 36-year-old Estonian citizen — agreed to this damages estimate as part of his plea, according to a press release from the DoJ. He had been living in the Netherlands before he travelled to Virginia to make the deal with the US authorities. The DoJ added that Nomm had acknowledged that through his work as a computer programmer for Megaupload, he had become aware of copyright-infringing material being stored on its sites, including films and TV shows that had contained FBI anti-piracy warnings. It said he had also admitted to having downloaded copyright-infringing files himself. "This conviction is a significant step forward in the largest criminal copyright case in US history," said assistant attorney general Leslie Caldwell."

One Man's Quest To Rid Wikipedia of Exactly One Grammatical Mistake 425

An anonymous reader writes with this Fascinating profile of one particular Wikipedia editor Giraffedata (a 51-year-old software engineer named Bryan Henderson), who has spent the last seven years correcting only the incorrect use of "comprised of" on Wikipedia. Using a code to crawl for uses of "comprised of" throughout all of Wiki's articles, he'll then go in and manually correct them (for example, using "consists of" or "composed of") and has made over 47,000 edits to date.

Let's organize this thing and take all the fun out of it.