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Comment: Re:Single-pixel what? (Score 1) 46

by drinkypoo (#48483219) Attached to: Single Pixel Camera Takes Images Through Breast Tissue

No, the sensor isn't moving, except in case 1 in which the principle is illustrated. What it sounds like to me is that instead of moving the sensor, you project combinations of patterns onto the lens such that it cancels out every area except the one you want to sample. You subsample the image area and then interpolate the contents.

Comment: Re:Why Not phase out gasoline? (Score 1) 186

by drinkypoo (#48483211) Attached to: France Wants To Get Rid of Diesel Fuel

It has to be heavier to handle the increased stroke and pressures.

It barely has to be heavier to handle increased stroke, and it doesn't have to be at all heavier to handle the increased pressures because of the inherent design of the engine.

Yeah, there is torque, but that only gets you so much. If you were towing it would be different.

We have these things called gears, perhaps you have heard of them.

Comment: Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (Score 1) 201

by drinkypoo (#48482345) Attached to: Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

Sorry, forgot to mention it was on Linux 1.2.x

Yes, back in those days I also had a 386, although mine had 8MB RAM. I could therefore get away with only using 8MB of my 120MB ATA disk for swap. Today, I use 0MB of my 160GB SATA SSD, and also 0MB of the 320GB ATA that I use for my /opt.

Comment: Re:Why (Score 1) 186

by drinkypoo (#48482337) Attached to: France Wants To Get Rid of Diesel Fuel

Lol, ummm NO! The Euro market has been waay ahead of the US in this area for awhile. Hell they couldn't bring over their diesels for the longest time because our fuel was too shitty to run them!

NO! They were way ahead of us for awhile. But now they're way behind, because we've mandated low-sulfur diesel and they haven't, at least not all of them.

Comment: Re: Why (Score 2) 186

by drinkypoo (#48482331) Attached to: France Wants To Get Rid of Diesel Fuel

The issue is the particulate filters that are nowadays standards seem to be worse for your health: particles are so thin you can't see them anymore (hence no more belch smoke) but they're also so thin they can now enter your bloodstream more easily.

The issue is that there were always fine particulates, and they can't be trivially filtered out. But perhaps you missed it when we discussed here that gasoline engines produce as much soot as diesels, and it is all of the exceptionally-fine kind. Now that the big stuff is being filtered out of the diesel exhaust, all we have left is a relatively small amount of that PM2.5.

Ideally we'd do away with the ICEs entirely and eliminate all that crap, get down to worrying about how to eliminate it from the tires. But what's really pathetic is that we've had the technology at least since the 1800s to solve all of these problems. It's called electrified rail. With modern levels of traffic, it is worthwhile to have people in packets smaller than train cars, however, yet with the distances which must be covered the vehicles must have their own power storage. Current battery and self-driving vehicle technology permits just this particular use case. We have every piece we need to replace cars entirely with PRT save for the will, starting in the densest city centers and moving outwards in stages related primarily to the availabilty of parking.

AHEM. Back on topic. "invisible smoke doesn't mean it's better" is exactly why diesel is better than gasoline. And yet, soot isn't even the worst emission that cars produce! It's unburned hydrocarbons, also known as raw fuel. And by their nature, diesels which are running properly run lean all the time, that's just how they operate. That means they're burning their fuel. It also means they produce more NOx, but that's why diesels now have catalysts.

Comment: Re:Why Not phase out gasoline? (Score 1) 186

by drinkypoo (#48482317) Attached to: France Wants To Get Rid of Diesel Fuel

They are also heavier and more expensive. Nothing comes for free.

It does if you're subaru and you've got opposed cylinders and thus it doesn't have to be heavier, and the whole world is moving towards turbocharged gasoline direct injection anyway which means the engines cost just as much as diesels. and guess what? they foul their intake valves more than diesels do! hilarity ensues.

Comment: Re:Why (Score 1) 186

by drinkypoo (#48482301) Attached to: France Wants To Get Rid of Diesel Fuel

Granted it is not the cleanest fuel.

It is the cleanest fuel. We discussed here on slashdot how (gasoline-driven) cars emit more black carbon than previously thought) and the diesels are more efficient so you actually wind up with diesel as the cleanest fuel once you get the traps and filters and piss injection and whatnot. It's true that gasoline direct injection is close, but it's also true that it takes less energy to make diesel than gasoline, that diesel contains more energy than gasoline per liter, and that diesel is less volatile and thus less hazardous to transport and store than gasoline. All in all, it is the superior fuel. Also, it can be made from biological feedstocks including oils from algae, waste animal fats, and so on, and with proper seals and fuel line linings mixed to any proportion with petrodiesel.

Diesel is a better fuel than gasoline in every single way. If, like Subaru, you build your diesel with opposed cylinders, it doesn't even have to be big and heavy because vibration is inherently cancelled by the design. It's just better. The TGDIs are just as expensive as TDIs. So the only thing wrong with Diesel fuel here in the USA is the taxes, and the only thing wrong with it in France is that they want to get rid of it, probably for a reason mentioned elsewhere in this discussion — it's taxed less there.

Comment: Re:Why (Score 2) 186

by drinkypoo (#48482277) Attached to: France Wants To Get Rid of Diesel Fuel

Half the vehicles in my jurisdiction, even brand new, have that bypasses by the owner.

Since you are an anonymous coward, your anecdote is worth even less than the usual nothing. Even if your veracity were assured, we have no idea where you are. We know only that you are cowardly, and make both typos and unsubstantiated statements.

Comment: Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (Score 1) 201

by drinkypoo (#48479093) Attached to: Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

my SSD (OCZ) is still kicking even if it spent half its life in a XP machine without any TRIM support

OCZ? That's probably why it survived.

Last summer I dismantled a whole bunch of HDDs for recycling, and you can see modern drives are cheaply built (no dessicant cartridge, less filtering and other stuff). That's the price to pay for the capacity race.

So were those all consumer-level drives, or were any of them sold as "enterprise"?

Comment: Re:Cheap laptops (Score 1) 201

by drinkypoo (#48479081) Attached to: Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

I haven't laptop-shopped in a long while, I'm kind of awash in them right now, but last time I looked even most fairly low-end laptops were offered either with a small SSD or a larger HDD; say, 40/250, 80/400, 120/500, something like that. The very-lowest-end machines (netbooks) were coming with as little as 4GB flash, but up to 16 or rarely 32GB as you say. It was however often on a module that you could upgrade if it wasn't already a 32GB.

Comment: Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (Score 1) 201

by drinkypoo (#48479059) Attached to: Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

But at least when a drive is getting ready to donate its' magets to the fridge door, it usually makes noises, clicks, squeals, etc. That gives time to back it up.

I've only had one 3.5" drive warn me with scary noises before the noises were so scary that they frightened it out of giving me any data. In fact, the first 3.5" drive I had fail did so silently but with the smell of smoke — turned out that it (a Seagate half-height RLL drive whose ST- number shall remain forgotten if I am lucky, I could use that space for phone numbers) had experienced stiction and then burned the stepper power trace off the board. By the time a jumper wire had been soldered across the trace, the drive cooled down and it spun up and functioned again. The next time it stuck hard and burned the trace off again, so I just popped the case lid off without damaging the foam gasket, reached in and spun the spindle with my thumbs and then popped the lid back on after giving it a quick puff to blow any dust off the top platter, soldered on another jumper, and it worked faithfully until I retired it. I believe that was a 40MB with at least three platters, if you could see 'em you could've about counted the cylinders. It never made a bad noise through the whole experience, and it was basically an antique by modern standards.

I did have one 2.5 inch drive develop massive bearing whine before failure, but I've had two fail silently.

Comment: Re:How about transfer rate and reliability? (Score 1) 201

by drinkypoo (#48479033) Attached to: Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

I have my swap on a ramdisk (ducks)

don't you? I do. It's compressed, too. And what's more, you can have this on your phone. Most of the alternate Android kernels I've tried have come with zRam support, but it was also [relatively] recently added to Ubuntu as a default feature.

actual swap is so 1990s. even in the last decade I was mostly disabling it. in fact, I don't have any swap enabled on any computers, from 128MB RAM (the least of anything I've got, now — and they're pogoplug v4s and a dockstar) up to 8GB. This only caused me problems in Windows 7, where Java shits itself when trying to use 3GB out of 8GB (yes, it's 64-bit) even when I have no other foreground applications whatsoever. But then, Windows is what it is, incredibly polished in some areas, an incredible turd in others. Kind of like Linux. All I want is video from my firewire camera (which is working fine, actually, in spite of being literally one of the earliest examples, an iBot) in V4L applications. Is that really too much to ask? Apparently yes, yes it is. And sadly, it used to work, I've done it before. v4l2-loopback doesn't work and vloopback doesn't build, I haven't yet figured if the right diddling can make that happen or if the interfaces it needs are gone.

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