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The Courts

US DOJ Drops Charges Against Two Seized Websites 152

Posted by samzenpus
from the forget-about-it dept.
angry tapir writes "The U.S. Department of Justice has dropped its case against two Spanish websites that stream sports events nearly 17 months after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement seized the sites and shut them down for alleged copyright violations. In a one-page brief to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York on Wednesday, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara of the district said his office had dropped the case against Rojadirecta.com and Rojadirecta.org. ICE seized the two sites on Jan. 31, 2011, and the DOJ asked the court to order that Puerto 80 Projects, the owner of the sites, forfeit the sites to the U.S. government."

Comment: Re:brave nerd on bleeding edge of wearable nerdine (Score 2) 1198

Or just stay out of Europe. In case you've not seen the news lately, the EU is turning into a pretty violent place with citizens attacking police & vice versa.

I heard the US is full of mad people with big guns who keep going to McDonald's and make the larger carnagge ever.

There, are we done with stupid stereotypes? Or should we Europeans continue counter-attacking with the stupid lost American tourist?

Only on slashdot - stupid and desperately misinformed stereotypes modded 5 insightful.

Comment: Re:Whats the difference... (Score 1) 486

by alfredos (#40605451) Attached to: Hackers Steal Keyless BMW In Under 3 Minutes
As a former BMW car owner and current BMW motorcycle owner, my experience is quite the opposite. Not cheap indeed, but not expensive either and at all times very professional. I claim no serious study but my company owns a Smart (which is maintained by Mercedes, at least here in Spain) and I find BMW far more reasonable.
Earth

Exxon CEO: Warming Happening, But Fears Overblown 288

Posted by samzenpus
from the we-didn't-start-the-fire dept.
Freshly Exhumed writes "In a speech Wednesday, ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson acknowledged that burning of fossil fuels is warming the planet, but said society will be able to adapt. The risks of oil and gas drilling are well understood and can be mitigated, he said. And dependence on other nations for oil is not a concern as long as access to supply is certain, he said. Tillerson blamed a public that is "illiterate" in science and math, a "lazy" press, and advocacy groups that "manufacture fear" for energy misconceptions in a speech at the Council on Foreign Relations."

Comment: Re:If you're going to crash (Score 1) 239

by alfredos (#39879745) Attached to: Electric Airplane Ready For Production

Thanks Commander Data. That was very informative.

I beg to differ, ensign Crusher. Many fatal crashes on small (propeller, single engine) airplanes could be avoided if the pilot had taken gliding lessons. Also, small and low altitude have a high correlation but, as usual, correlation is not causation - many small airplanes out there can fly into altitudes on which loss of pressurization leaves precious little minutes of useful conscience before hypoxia makes the pilot lose it. Unfortunately, high performance requires altitude - that's why the airliners take the trouble to go way up there.

News

Police Forensics Team Salvage Blind Authors' Inkless Novel Pages 100

Posted by samzenpus
from the show-your-work dept.
Blind author Trish Vickers wrote 26 pages of her novel's first chapter when her son noticed she was writing without ink. Her manuscript was saved however after they took it to the Dorset Police department. A forensic team there worked on it in their spare time, and after 5 months they were able to recover the lost pages. Vickers said: “I think they used a combination of various lights at different angles to see if they could get the impression made by my pen. I am so happy, pleased and grateful. It was really nice of them and I want to thank them for helping me out.”
Data Storage

Portugal Is Considering a "Terabyte Tax" 353

Posted by samzenpus
from the pay-to-store dept.
An anonymous reader writes "As a proposal to avoid becoming the 'next Greece', a Portuguese opposition party has proposed a tax on storage. The party claims that the tax will not effect the average citizen and is mostly levied at business users, but internal storage on mobile phones means a 64GB iPhone could be €32 more expensive. From the article: 'The proposal would have consumers paying an extra €0.2 per gigabyte in tax, almost €21 extra per terabyte of data on hard drives. Devices with storage capacities in excess of 1TB would pay an aggravated tax of 2.5 cents per GB. That means a 2TB device will in fact pile on €51.2 in taxes alone (2.5 cents times 2048GB). External drives or “multimedia drives” as the proposed bill calls them, in capacities greater than 1TB, can be taxed to the tune of 5 cents per gigabyte, so in theory, a 2TB drive would cost an additional €103.2 per unit (5 cents times 2048GB)."
Education

Tennessee "Teaching the Controversy" Bill Becomes Law 672

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the tennessee-legislators-evolved-from-trogdolytes dept.
MrKevvy writes "The Tennessee 'Teaching the Controversy' bill was passed into law today. 'A law to allow public school teachers to challenge the scientific consensus on issues like climate change and evolution will soon take effect in Tennessee. State governor Bill Haslam allowed the bill — passed by the state House and Senate — to become law without signing it, saying he did not believe the legislation "changes the scientific standards that are taught in our schools."'" The governor adds: "However, I also don’t believe that it accomplishes anything that isn’t already acceptable in our schools."
Android

Technology For the Masses: Churches Going Hi-Tech 249

Posted by samzenpus
from the open-up-your-pdf-and-sing dept.
theodp writes "More and more, reports the Chicago Tribune, churches are embracing the use of tablets and smartphones during services. At Trinity United Church of Christ on Chicago's South Side, the Rev. Otis Moss III preaches from his iPad. 'There was a time in the church when the Gutenberg Bible was introduced,' notes early adopter Moss. 'There was a severe concern among ministers who were afraid the printed page would be such a distraction if you put it in the hands of people in worship.' Tech-savvy churchgoers are also on board. 'In the service, when they say to pull out Bibles, I pull that phone out,' Ted Allen Miller said of using his Android smartphone at Willow Creek Community Church."
Government

White House CIO Describes His 'Worst Day' Ever 333

Posted by Soulskill
from the need-a-bipartisan-effort-to-swap-out-a-machine dept.
dcblogs writes "In the first 40 days of President Barack Obama's administration, the White House email system was down 23% of time, according to White House CIO Brook Colangelo, the person who also delivered the 'first presidential Blackberry.' The White House IT systems inherited by the new administration were in bad shape. Over 82% of the White House's technology had reached its end of life. Desktops, for instance, still had floppy disk drives, including the one Colangelo delivered to Rahm Emanuel, Obama's then chief of staff and now Mayor of Chicago. There were no redundant email servers."
IBM

IBM Seeks Patent On Judging Programmers By Commits 182

Posted by timothy
from the combine-with-eye-tracking dept.
theodp writes "How'd you like to be deemed unworthy of a job based upon a scan of your GitHub updates? That's what proposed in a newly-published IBM patent application for Automated Analysis of Code Developer's Profile, which proposes weeding out developer candidates for certain roles based on things like the amount of changes one typically makes with each commit, how frequently and regularly one makes commits, what hours of the day one makes commits, the percentage of commits with conflicts that one resolves, and the 'depth' of one's commit comments ('shallow', 'mid-range' or 'deep'). Big Blue explains that commit or repository interactions can be used to produce a 'conclusion report' that compares a developer to others who have profiles on the repository, which helps management 'avoid wasted time with ineffective developers."
Space

Russian Scientist Claims Signs of Life Spotted On Venus 272

Posted by samzenpus
from the we-are-not-alone dept.
flergum writes "Leonid Ksanfomaliti, an astronomer based at the Space Research Institute of Russia's Academy of Sciences, analyzed photographs taken by a Russian landing probe during 1982 and claims to have found signs of life. Ksanfomaliti says the Russian photographs depict objects resembling a 'disk,' a 'black flap' and a 'scorpion.'"
Your Rights Online

Filesonic Removes Ability To Share Files 412

Posted by samzenpus
from the closing-shop dept.
Ihmhi writes "In the wake of the Megaupload takedown, Filesonic has elected to take preventative measures against a similar fate. The front page and all files now carry the following message: 'All sharing functionality on FileSonic is now disabled. Our service can only be used to upload and retrieve files that you have uploaded personally.' Whether or not this will actually deter the U.S. government from taking action remains to be seen."
Medicine

Mutant Flu Researchers Declare a Time Out 224

Posted by Soulskill
from the it-worked-on-saved-by-the-bell dept.
New submitter scibri writes "Researchers working on highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza have said they will stop work on the virus for 60 days, to allow them to explain the importance of their work to politicians and the public. Quoting: 'Despite the positive public-health benefits these studies sought to provide, a perceived fear that the ferret-transmissible H5 HA viruses may escape from the laboratories has generated intense public debate in the media on the benefits and potential harm of this type of research. We would like to assure the public that these experiments have been conducted with appropriate regulatory oversight in secure containment facilities by highly trained and responsible personnel to minimize any risk of accidental release.'" Reader Harperdog sends in a related article arguing that we shouldn't be having a debate about the censorship of research, but rather a debate over whether the research should have been allowed in the first place.

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