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Submission + - Will the US Lose Control of the Internet? ( 2

Jeremiah Cornelius writes: Upon revelation of the extent of US foreign intelligence surveillance, through efforts by Edward Snowden and LavaBit founder Ladar Levison, an increasing number of nation's have expressed official dismay and concern over the US dominance in managing the infrastructure for request and transit of information on the Internet. In the past, ICANN challenges have been secondary to efforts in the UN ITU — until now. Yesterday at a summit in Uruguay, every major Internet governing body pledged to free themselves of the influence of the US government. "The directors of ICANN, the Internet Engineering Task Force, the Internet Architecture Board, the World Wide Web Consortium, the Internet Society and all five of the regional Internet address registries have vowed to break their associations with the US government. The group called for "accelerating the globalization of ICANN and IANA functions, towards an environment in which all stakeholders, including all governments, participate on an equal footing". Any doubt about the reason or timing of this statement is dispelled with the inclusion: "the group 'expressed strong concern over the undermining of the trust and confidence of Internet users globally due to recent revelations of pervasive monitoring and surveillance'."

The US argument for maintaining governance has been the need to maintain "a free and open Internet" versus interests of authoritarian societies. Has recent understanding of the wholesale surveillance of telecommunications by the NSA completely ruined the US reputation as the just custodian of that mission?


Submission + - Conservatives Commitment to Internet Surveillance ( 1

alexo writes: Dr. Michael Geist writes that Canada's Conservatives committed to pass "lawful access" legislation that would fundamentally reshape the Internet in Canada within the new Parliament's first 100 days if they win a majority.

The legislation includes new laws that would establish massive Internet surveillance requirements and the potential disclosure of personal information without court oversight.

The proposed bills were never debated in parliament nor subjected to committee hearings, yet the Conservatives election platform promises to bundle all the crime and justice bills into a single omnibus bill and to pass it within a new Parliament's first 100 days.

With the elections looming, it is time to fight for your rights.


Submission + - Speak Out on Bill C-32 (

alexo writes: Dr. Michael Geist, a law professor and the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at the University of Ottawa, writes in his blog that the Bill C-32 Legislative Committee is accepting briefs on the controversial "Copyright Modernization Act" (a.k.a the Canadian DMCA) until the end of January 2011.

The Committee has set the following parameters for input: In order for briefs on Bill C-32 to be considered by the Committee in a timely fashion, the document should be submitted to the Committee's mailbox at by the end of January, 2011. A brief which is longer than 5 pages should be accompanied by a 1 page executive summary and in any event should not exceed 10 pages in length.

The article also contains Dr. Geist's suggestions on the possible modifications that will make this bill less skewed against consumers.

Write early, only 5 days left.

Submission + - Marijuana Soda Provides a High Without the Smoke (

disco_tracy writes: One Colorado soda company has developed a line of sodas that have an unusual ingredient: marijuana. Dixie Elixirs has made their drinks available to anyone with a prescription for medical marijuana. The drinks come in eight different flavors, including pink lemonade, root beer and grape. But if the company really wants to get their drinks into the hands of marijuana lovers, they may want to start working on pizza and nachos flavors.

Submission + - "We Don't Care, As Long as the U.S. Is Satisfied" (

An anonymous reader writes: ...the decision to introduce U.S.-style DMCA rules in Canada in 2007 was strictly a political decision, the result of pressure from the Prime Minister's Office desire to meet U.S. demands. She states "the Prime Minister's Office's position was, move quickly, satisfy the United States." When Bernier and then-Canadian Heritage Minister Bev Oda protested, the PMO replied "we don't care what you do, as long as the U.S. is satisfied."

Submission + - Which image organizer?

An anonymous reader writes: There are a lot of image organizers out there, both free and non-free, each with its strong points and limitations.
In view of the prevalent Slashdotter stereotype, I'd like to tap into your common wisdom and ask for a recommendation for an image organizer that can do the following:
- Handle very large numbers of files in nested folder structures.
- Tag individual images as well as groups and/or folders with user-defined keywords.
- Store the tags within the image metadata (IPTC or XMF) so that manually moving them around will not confuse the program.
- Search and display by keywords and other criteria (e.g., show me all files tagged with "family", "vacation" and "funny").
- Detect images that look similar for culling.

So, what program are you using to manage your image collection?

Submission + - Shareaza site hacked, project vandalized ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: You may remember when imposters hijacked the domain of the original Shareaza team and later attempted to file a trademark with the USPTO for the name "Shareaza", which prompted the project's maintainers to move their site and begin working on a new project named Panthera. Now, it appears that the website for both projects has been removed entirely, while the project page on SourceForge has been defaced — renaming the project to "--" and with recent activity of multiple sockpuppet accounts being invited to the group. I have not seen nor heard any corroborating accounts on what potentially happened as of this writing. What's going on here?

Honesty is for the most part less profitable than dishonesty. -- Plato