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Comment: Re:Here is my (incomplete) list: (Score 1) 371

by alaskana98 (#47779163) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Are the Best Games To Have In Your Collection?
Yes, that would be fantastic. I'm pretty interested in the CPS 1 hardware, on which M.E.R.C.S runs and always thought it would be cool to have one of those boards. You can message me at alaskana_98@yahoo.com if you are still interested in getting rid of it. Thanks!

Comment: Here is my (incomplete) list: (Score 1) 371

by alaskana98 (#47778093) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Are the Best Games To Have In Your Collection?
Not saying these are the best games, but these are some of my favorites from some classic systems: -Atari 2600: Hero, Pitfall, Pitfall 2, Combat, Frogger, Yars Revenge -NES: Super Mario Bros. 1, 2, 3, Bionic Commando, Battletoads, Final Fantasy, Dragon Warrior, Mega Man 2, Castlevania 3, Dr. Mario -SNES: Super Mario World, Pilotwings, Final Fantasy 2 (IV), 3 (VI), Secret of Mana, Street Fighter 2, The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, E.V.O -N64: Super Mario 64, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarnia of Time, Cruisn' USA -Arcade: Daytona USA, Star Wars (the original vector one), Willow, Attax, Street Fighter 2, Final Fight, M.E.R.C.S, Pac Man, Ms. Pac Man, Virtua Fighter 1, 2, 3 -3DO: The Need For Speed, Gex, Wing Commander 3, Star Control 2 -Gameboy: Tetris, Super Mario Land, Gargoyle's Quest, Final Fantasy Adventure, Legend Of Zelda: The Wind Waker -Sega Saturn: Virtua Fighter 1, 2, Daytona USA, Street Fighter Alpha, X Men: Children of the Atom, Panzer Dragoon 1, 2

+ - So, what are THE BEST games to have in your collection? 3

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "I am not a 'gamer', per se. What I grew up on was 'old school' arcade/atari/arcade type games. What my question is...,

What are THE VERY BEST games to own? And it does not matter what console/system/phone based games you own. My question is...

"What are the very best games to have in your collection?""

Comment: Just a thought (Score 5, Informative) 246

by alaskana98 (#47764471) Attached to: Fermilab Begins Testing Holographic Universe Theory
Upon reading the research summary, I don't see anywhere where it implies that we are in a simulation. I think they are just proposing that the fundamental construction of reality is 2D but is ultimately 'projected' as 3D due to quantum effect. At least that is the way I interpret this, I could be wrong though.

+ - We scam the Indian call centre scammers->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "At TechCentral, we get on average called at least once a week — sometimes far more often — by a friendly sounding Indian national warning us that our Windows computer is infected with a virus. The call, which originates from a call centre, follows exactly the same script every time. Usually we shrug them off and put the phone down, but this week we thought we’d humour them to find out how they operate.
As this week’s call came in, the first thing the “operator” at the other end of the line tried to establish was who was owner of the Windows computer in the household. I’d taken the call. It was time to have some fun. I told the scammer that I was the PC owner. He proceeded to introduce himself as “John Connor”. I laughed quietly as I imagined Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Terminator hunting down this scamster in the streets of Calcutta. Perhaps he should have come up with a more convincing name."

Link to Original Source

+ - Facebook Cleans Up News Feed By Reducing Click-Bait Headlines

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Facebook today announced further plans to clean up the News Feed by reducing stories with click-bait headlines as well as stories that have links shared in the captions of photos or within status updates. The move comes just four months after the social network reduced Like-baiting posts, repeated content, and spammy links."

Comment: Here are my must play classics (Score 1) 3

by alaskana98 (#47750633) Attached to: So, what are THE BEST games to have in your collection?
Not saying these are the best games, but these are some of my favorites from some classic systems:

-Atari 2600: Hero, Pitfall, Pitfall 2, Combat, Frogger, Yars Revenge
-NES: Super Mario Bros. 1, 2, 3, Bionic Commando, Battletoads, Final Fantasy, Dragon Warrior, Mega Man 2, Castlevania 3, Dr. Mario
-SNES: Super Mario World, Pilotwings, Final Fantasy 2 (IV), 3 (VI), Secret of Mana, Street Fighter 2, The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, E.V.O
-N64: Super Mario 64, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarnia of Time, Cruisn' USA
-Arcade: Daytona USA, Star Wars (the original vector one), Willow, Attax, Street Fighter 2, Final Fight, M.E.R.C.S, Pac Man, Ms. Pac Man, Virtua Fighter 1, 2, 3
-3DO: The Need For Speed, Gex, Wing Commander 3, Star Control 2
-Gameboy: Tetris, Super Mario Land, Gargoyle's Quest, Final Fantasy Adventure, Legend Of Zelda: The Wind Waker
-Sega Saturn: Virtua Fighter 1, 2, Daytona USA, Street Fighter Alpha, X Men: Children of the Atom, Panzer Dragoon 1, 2

Comment: On a more serious note (Score 1) 7

by alaskana98 (#47748941) Attached to: What is Nothing?
I've recently come to think of the concept of 'nothingness' as the lack of any information in any given system. For example, if our reality is a simulation, and matter/anti-matter is represented as information in the computer (or whatever is driving the simulation), then a lack of information would represent nothingness in the simulation. This of course would imply that there is still a container for the nothingness, which would itself be 'not-nothing'. Just some of my personal musings, of course.

+ - What is Nothing? 7

Submitted by Paul Fernhout
Paul Fernhout (109597) writes "Fraser Crain explores the issue of "Whether there any place in the Universe where there's truly nothing?". That article is also discussed at phys.org. One comment there by Evgenij Barsoukov uses the rules for finding mathematical limits to compute the probability of the Universe coming into spontaneous existence out of absolute nothingness at 0.6...."

Comment: Freaky (Score 2) 110

by alaskana98 (#46130499) Attached to: Russia's Dyatlov Pass Incident May Have Been Explained By Modern Science
The Dylatov Pass incident is one of the more freaky, but lesser known horror events of the 20th century. I'm a paranormal buff and I only learned about it in 2008. Whether the outcome was just the result of a series of unfortunate but scientifically explainable events or something more of the paranormal variety, here are some key takeaways from its Wikipedia page:

-Six of the group members died of hypothermia and three of fatal injuries.
-There were no indications of other people nearby apart from the nine travelers on Kholat Syakhl, nor anyone in the surrounding areas.
-The tent had been ripped open from within.
-The victims had died 6 to 8 hours after their last meal.
-Traces from the camp showed that all group members left the camp of their own accord, on foot.
-To dispel the theory of an attack by the indigenous Mansi people, Dr. Boris Vozrozhdenny stated that the fatal injuries of the three bodies could not have been caused by another human being, "because the force of the blows had been too strong and no soft tissue had been damaged".[2]
-Forensic radiation tests had shown high doses of radioactive contamination on the clothes of a few victims.[2]
-Released documents contained no information about the condition of the skiers' internal organs.

No matter how you slice it (no pun intended), this is some freaky shit.

+ - What the World Might Look Like if Microsoft, Apple and Google were Counties

Submitted by alaskana98
alaskana98 (1509139) writes "Slovekian artist Martin Vargic has created a breathtaking old world style map depicting the major players that comprise the 'Internet ecosystem' as if they were countries. From the Slate article:

            "The Internet map's nation-states aren’t represented precisely to scale, but it does take their Alexa rank into account, so that one can easily see which kingdoms are the United Stateses and Chinas of the Internet and which are the Tuvalus and Luxembourgs. One real-world dichotomy that’s reflected in the Internet map is the concept of an Old World and a New World, with AOL, Microsoft, HP, and IBM composing a sort of online Europe, while Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest form a virtual North America."

Can a new version of 'Risk' be far behind?"

Comment: Re:Wish it was not split into 2 movies (Score 1) 130

by alaskana98 (#41391761) Attached to: New <em>Hobbit</em> Trailer Debuts
I got bad news for ya. He's splitting it into THREE parts. I'm guessing the first movie will cut off right before they get to Mirkwood, the second will have them going from Mirkwood to when Smaug is first shown, then the third will deal with Smaug and all the other grandiose things that happen after that.
The Military

+ - Remembering Mustard Gas

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens
Hugh Pickens writes "Deborah Blum, author of "The Poisoner’s Handbook," writes that last week the US Army announced that its excavation of an old chemical munitions dump – unfortunately located in one of Washington DC’s more elegant neighborhoods – had turned up remnants of two of the ugliest weapons developed in World War I — mustard gas and the arsenic-laced blistering agent Lewisite. Mustard gas contains concentrated sulfur which when mixed with other ingredients become a ferocious form of sulfuric acid. Technically known as a vesicant, or blistering agent, mustard gas burns on contact, through material, through leather, through skin, raising a thick layer of oozing yellow blisters, searing the eyes into crusted blindness. It was rarely instantly lethal but always excruciatingly painful. “I wish people who talk about going on with this war whatever the cost could see the soldiers suffering from mustard gas poisoning,” wrote one nurse, telling of teenage boys strapped down to their beds, fighting for breath, their voices burned away to a hoarse whisper, praying to die. All in all, more than a million soldiers were injured by the poison gases used in World War I and almost ten percent of them – some 91,000 – died. Outlawed by the Geneva Protocol of 1925, mustard gas has been used as recently as 1988 in the war between Iraq and Iran, and although most of us have forgotten just how wicked these materials can be, the discovery of the chemical dump serves "as a valuable reminder," writes Blum, "that some chemical experiments should really be left, forever, in the past.""

The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth. -- Niels Bohr

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