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Submission + - Intel Announces Clover Trail+ Atom Platform For Smartphones and Tablets (

MojoKid writes: "Today, Intel announced the follow-on to their Medfield Atom platform for smartphones, code-named Clover Trail+. Clover Trail is powering a few Windows 8 Pro tablets currently. However, Clover Trail+, Intel’s new performance and feature-optimized version of Clover Trail for smartphones and tablets, has a long row to hoe versus incumbents like Qualcomm, Samsung and NVIDIA, at least in the highly competitive handset arena. What’s interesting this time around is that Clover Trail+ seems to really have the chops (at least on paper) to keep pace with the performance of current, best-of-class ARM-based architectures that have been so dominant in smartphones. Clover Trail+ is another 32nm design and Intel has beefed up almost every major functional block on the platform. From its now dual-core, 4-thread capable Atom CPU, to its new PowerVR SGX 544MP2 graphics engine, 2GB of LPDDR2 1066 DRAM, up to 256GB of NAND storage, a higher resolution 16MP camera and Intel’s XMM 6360 HSPA+ 42Mbps modem, with LTE support from their XMM 7160 radio moving forward; Intel’s Clover Trail+ smartphone reference design brings a lot more to the table than Medfield ever did."

Submission + - Silicon Valley's Pollution Problem Bites Google (

redletterdave writes: "Google has shut down two buildings close to its headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., ordering all staff to evacuate until further notice as the air in those buildings has become too toxic and dangerous to work in. The cause of the dangerous fumes is a toxic solvent called trichloroethylene, or TCE, which is highly toxic to the human central nervous system and highly associated with cancers in the liver and kidneys, as well as Parkinson’s disease. Millions of gallons of TCE continue to impact the soil and water beneath Google's property — a result frequent chemical dumping in the 1960s and 1970s — but while the EPA says Google employees need not worry as TCE "takes decades of exposure to cause problems,' a recent study found a spike in TCE-related cancers in the affected area."

Submission + - Scientists Create Mice That Can't Feel Cold (

kkleiner writes: "Scientists created a group of mice that were incapable of feeling cold by killing off the neurons in the body whose specific job it is to transmit cold sensation from the skin to the brain. Rather than an attempt to create an X-men-like mutation, the study sheds light on how the nervous system transmits sensory information from the body to the brain and may help to develop more sophisticated pain medicines. The study was published in the February 13 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience — led by David McKemy, associate professor of neurobiology at the University of Southern California Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences."

Submission + - Mobile Carriers Use Firefox OS To Fight Google, Apple (

jfruh writes: "The first Firefox OS phones are arriving, and the fledgling mobile platform is getting a surprising amount of backing from mobile carriers. One reason: those carriers believe it provides a weapon against Apple and Google, which the mobile industry sees as raking in profits for apps and phones that rightfully belong to the companies that deal with government regulations and build out mobile infrastructure."

Submission + - Microsoft admits to being hacked too (

colinneagle writes: Once upon a time, Microsoft claimed that falling prey to social engineering tactics and then being hacked was a "rookie mistake." But now is the time for companies to jump on the bandwagon, to admit they were targeted by cyberattacks and successfully infiltrated. The stage is so crowded with 'giants' at this point, that there are fewer 'bad press' repercussions than if only one major company had admitted to being breached. Microsoft now admitted, hey we were hacked too.

"As reported by Facebook and Apple, Microsoft can confirm that we also recently experienced a similar security intrusion," wrote Matt Thomlinson, General Manager of Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Security. Unlike the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal there was no mention of Chinese hackers. Is there a moral to these sad tales? Perhaps only that anyone can become a victim.

However, back in 2011, John Howie, Microsoft's senior director in the Online Services Security & Compliance (OSSC) team, basically claimed that unlike RSA or Sony, Microsoft sites are unhackable and can't be DDoSed. In regards to the breach at RSA, Howie told Computing News, "RSA got hacked because someone got socially engineered and opened a dodgy email attachment. A rookie mistake." Furthermore "Sony was coded badly and failed to patch its servers. These are rookie mistakes." Howie added, "At Microsoft we have robust mechanisms to ensure we don't have unpatched servers. We have training for staff so they know how to be secure and be wise to social engineering."


Submission + - Standard Kilogram Gains Weight (

mrbluze writes: The standard kilogram weights which are used by countries around the world for calibration have variably increased in mass by tens of micrograms. This poses a threat to the precision and comparability of measurements in science, engineering and trade. The problem is due to surface contamination, but a safe method of cleaning the weights has only recently been devised by the use of ozone and ultraviolet light.

Submission + - An Interview with David Litchfield (

CowboyRobot writes: "David Litchfield is best known for his work on Oracle database security. He found what was then a new class of bug in Oracle software that could be used for lateral SQL injection attacks, as well as another previously unknown class of vulnerability that could be exploited for so-called "cursor-snarfing" attacks. The turning point for his career was 2002, when he and some colleagues at NGSSoftware started digging around Microsoft's SQL Server software for flaws. After demonstrating at Black Hat that year a vulnerability he discovered in the product, someone weaponized the research, resulting in the infamous Slammer worm that hit big-time in January of 2003. Slammer was a game-changing moment for Microsoft software security, as well as for the industry overall. "Someone had taken my exploit code ... It was one of those nightmare moments: am I doing the right thing there?" In an interview at Dark Reading, Litchfield describes his career as bug-hunter, his hobby diving with sharks, and how the movie, "The Net" pulled him away from zoology and toward his career as security expert."

Submission + - OLPC to sell 7-inch XO Tablet in Wal-Mart (

angry tapir writes: "One Laptop Per Child is back in the tablet race, announcing a new 7-inch tablet with the Android OS that will be sold commercially and include its learning software. The XO Tablet was announced at the International CES show in Las Vegas. OLPC will license the design to Sakar International, which will sell the tablet in the U.S. through Wal-Mart."

Submission + - Cisco bothes patch for call-snooping vulnerability (

An anonymous reader writes: Cisco screwed up its first attempt to patch a dangerous vulnerability that could allow an attacker to listen to phone calls made from some of the company's VOIP phones in the 7900 series. It's working on another patch. The vulnerability was one of several found by researchers are Columbia University, who say VOIP phones systems are rife with security issues.

Submission + - Doom 3 BFG Ported to Linux, Fully Playable (

An anonymous reader writes: No. The company that was once at the forefront of Linux gaming from as early as the late 90s, has done nothing other than make the source code — specific to the BFG edition — available open source. John Carmack even recently expressed his concern over whether or not Valve could possibly be successful in the tumultuous Linux desktop market. Therefore, it seemed unlikely we’d ever see BFG on Linux. So, who do we have to thank for this port?

Submission + - 2012 Warmest Year on Record, 2nd Most Extreme (

ideonexus writes: "Apparently 2012 is the warmest year on record according to the NOAA, and 12 of the 13 warmest years on record have all occurred since the year 2000, and decades of temperature measurements go from warmest to coldest by 2000s, 90s, 80s, 70s, 60s, 50s, 40s, 30s, 20s, 10s, 1900s, etc, etc. It's almost as if there's some sort of pattern here. If only there were some theory backed up by nearly 14,000 peer-reviewed research papers, 18 consensus statements by scientific organizations, and two centuries of reproducible laboratory results that could explain this strange "warming" phenomenon."

Submission + - You use Linux? What was your distro order? ( 6

colinneagle writes: Linux dude Bryan Lunduke blogged here about the top three approaches he thinks are the easiest for new users to pick up Linux. Lunduke's, for example, went Ubuntu -> Arch -> openSUSE.

It begs a question that Slashdot could answer well in the comments: what's your distro use order from beginning to now? Maybe we could spot some trends.


Submission + - Milky Way is Surrounded by Halo of Hot Gas (

littlesparkvt writes: Data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory was used to estimate that the mass of the halo is comparable to the mass of all the stars in the Milky Way galaxy. If the size and mass of this gas halo is confirmed, it could be the solution to the ”missing-baryon” problem for the Galaxy.

Submission + - The deepest picture of the Universe ever taken: the Hubble Extreme Deep Field

The Bad Astronomer writes: "Astronomers have unveiled what may be the deepest image of the Universe ever created: the Hubble Extreme Deep Field, a 2 million second exposure that reveals galaxies over 13 billion light years away. The faintest galaxies in the images are at magnitude 31, or one-ten-billionth as bright as the faintest object your naked eye can detect. Some are seen as they were when they were only 500 million years old."

Submission + - Toshiba to sell own hybrid drive for laptops (

SternisheFan writes: "Computerworld -The company that invented NAND flash, Toshiba, plans to become the third hard drive manufacturer to offer a hybrid drive. Hybrids combine a spinning disk with flash cache to offer near solid-state drive (SSD) performance at a fraction of the cost. Toshiba said its MQ01ABDH series hybrid drive will initially come in a 2.5-in. form-factor targeted for use in Ultrabooks in the fourth quarter of 2013 -in time for holiday sales.
    The drive comes in 750GB and 1TB capacities, and it has 8GB of NAND flash as well as 32MB of RAM.
    The 1TB drive will sell for about $140."

Why did the Roman Empire collapse? What is the Latin for office automation?