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Submission + - Secret Aerial FBI Program Uncovered By 23-Year-Old Journalist (cbslocal.com)

sharkbiter writes: The story was first reported by Sam Richards who put out information under the twitter handle @MinneapoliSam. The 23-year-old independent journalist first published the story of the FBI surveillance program on the website Medium on May 26.

His story featured screen grabs from FlightRadar24.com showing the circular routes the low-flying planes took over not just Minneapolis, but cities including New York, Chicago, Seattle, Phoenix and Dallas.

Richards said his investigation began when his friend noticed the low-flying suspicious flight and showed him the screen grab.

Submission + - Users With Weak SSH Keys Had Access to GitHub Repositories for Popular Projects

itwbennett writes: Earlier this year, researcher Ben Cox collected the public SSH (Secure Shell) keys of users with access to GitHub-hosted repositories by using one of the platform’s features. After an analysis, he found that the corresponding private keys could be easily recovered for many of them. The potentially vulnerable repositories include those of music streaming service Spotify, the Russian Internet company Yandex, the U.K. government and the Django Web application framework. GitHub revoked the keys, but it's not clear if they were ever abused by attackers.

Submission + - uTorrent can steal your CPU cycles to mine Bitcoins (engadget.com)

mlauzon writes: Engadget is reporting that the most recent version of uTorrent [3.4.2] is installing Epic Scale in the background to mine for Bitcoins and steal your computers CPU cycles, and BitTorrent Inc. reaps the rewards and you get nothing. It's bad enough that BitTorrent had to include ads in uTorrent, but this is icing on their cake. My suggestion is to jump ship and show BitTorrent Inc. that it can't do what it's doing and get away with it. Check out qBittorrent (http://www.qbittorrent.org/), a completely open source client licensed under GPLv2.

Submission + - Windows 93 Is Real, And It's Spectacular

rossgneumann writes: It’s 2015, but Windows 93 is finally ready. Your new favorite operating system is here and it’s weird as hell. The browser-based OS makes us thirst for what could’ve been if Microsoft didn’t skip between Windows 3.X and Windows 95. The fully clickable “OS” greets users with the Playstation 1 bootup sound signaling they’re about the trip into an alternate universe. The first version of Windows 93 went up in October, but its creator posted on Reddit last night that it’s finally complete.

Submission + - Energy-generating fabric set to power battery-free wearables (thestack.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A team of researchers in Korea and Australia have developed a flexible fabric which generates power from human movement – a breakthrough which could replace batteries in future wearable devices. The effect of the fabric's nanogenerators mirrors static electricity with the two fabrics repeatedly brushing against each other and stealing electrons from the one another – this exchange creates energy from the wearer’s activity without the need for an external power source. During testing, the researchers demonstrated the nanogenerator powering a number of devices such as LEDs, a liquid crystal display, as well as a keyless car entry system embedded in a nanogenerator “power suit”.

Submission + - New Chinese graphene smartphones boost battery life by 50% (thestack.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The first graphene phones have been unveiled today by two Chinese firms, Moxi and Galapad. The smartphones feature touch screens, batteries and thermal conduction, all of which incorporate the recently isolated ‘wonder’ material known for its extraordinary electrical conductivity, and strong chemical and mechanical properties. 30,000 graphene phones, which will use the Android system, were put on sale on Monday by Moxi and Galapad, in the Chongqing municipality in southwest China, for 2,499 yuan each. The graphene technology was developed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and is thought to make the touch screens more sensitive and prolong battery life by at least 50%.

Submission + - Law and Governance as a "Social Technology"

An anonymous reader writes: Virgin’s Entrepreneur blog has an article on an idea called "Startup Cities” which argues that governments should adopt the trial-and-error processes of tech startups. By giving municipalities strong autonomy, the article argues, reforms can be piloted on a smaller scale as different municipalities try different political solutions. From the article: "The biggest paradox of today’s world is that we have rapid, constant progress in physical technologies like phones and computers, but billions of people have no access at all to good law and governance, or what you might call ‘social technologies’. If we can treat law and governance as tech – then perhaps we can innovate in it.” The idea brings to mind Nassim Taleb’s argument that political risk should be spread over small, local jurisdictions so that policies don’t bring down entire countries if they fail.

Submission + - Shortcut, highly efficient event concessions (shortcutapp.com)

Buford Taylor writes: Founded by early employees of Eventbrite and Uber, Shortcut lets attendees at live events skip the queue at the concession or merchandise stand. They can order from their phones and receive exclusive discounts for their next event.

For the venue, it's increased sales, it's happier attendees, and it's a way to finally know which of their attendees are spending money at concessions.

Submission + - 5 Programming Languages You'll Need Next Year (and Beyond) (dice.com)

Nerval's Lobster writes: Over at Dice, there's a breakdown of the programming languages that could prove most popular over the next year or two, including Apple's Swift, JavaScript, CSS3, and PHP. But perhaps the most interesting entry on the list is Erlang, an older language that was invented in 1986 by engineers at Erricson. It was originally intended to be used specifically for telecommunications needs, but has since evolved into a general-purpose language, and found a home in cloud-based, high-performance computing when concurrency is needed. "There aren’t a lot of Erlang jobs out there," writes developer Jeff Cogswell. "However, if you do master it (and I mean master it, not just learn a bit about it), then you’ll probably land a really good job. That’s the trade-off: You’ll have to devote a lot of energy into it. But if you do, the payoffs could be high." And while the rest of the featured languages are no-brainers with regard to popularity, it's an open question how long it might take Swift to become popular, given how hard Apple will push it as the language for developing on iOS.

Submission + - Reglue: Opening Up the World to Deserving Kids with Linux Computers (linuxjournal.com)

jrepin writes: Today, a child without access to a computer (and the Internet) at home is at a disadvantage before he or she ever sets foot in a classroom. The unfortunate reality is that in an age where computer skills are no longer optional, far too many families don't possess the resources to have a computer at home. Linux Journal recently had the opportunity to talk with Ken Starks about his organization, Reglue (Recycled Electronics and Gnu/Linux Used for Education) and its efforts to bridge this digital divide.

Submission + - Tesla And Panasonic Have Reached An Agreement On The Gigafactory

cartechboy writes: Tesla's been pretty quiet regarding its upcoming gigafactory lately, but that's about to change. It seems the Silicon Valley startup has reached an agreement with Panasonic in regards to the gigafactory, and Panasonic's going to end up having skin in the game. While the electronics giant was originally skeptical of Tesla's battery factory, it now isn't just on board, it's actually going to participate in the construction of this new facility. It's reported that Panasonic will invest 20 billion to 30 billion yen (194 million to $291 million at current exchange rates), and supply fabrication machinery necessary for cell production. That means Pansonic could end up footing the bill for $1 billion of the total $5 billion anticipated investment required for the gigafactory to get off the ground. If things continue to move forward the Gigafactory should be online by the end of 2017.

Submission + - Cockroaches Evolving to Avoid Roach Motels (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Only a few years after roach motels were introduced in the 1980s, they lost their allure for an increasing number of German cockroaches. Researchers soon realized that some roaches had developed an aversion to glucose—the sugary bait disguising the poison—and that the insects were passing that trait on to their young. Now, scientists have figured out how this behavior evolved.

Submission + - Microsoft to launch Kinect for Windows sensor in 2014 (wordpress.com)

awaissoft writes: Microsoft will finally deliver a Kinect sensor for Windows sometime next year.

The company announced Thursday that the Kinect for Windows sensor will use the same set of technologies key to the new Kinect sensor for the Xbox One, both of which will allow people to issue commands using voice and gestures.

The sensor will include a high-definition color camera and a noise-isolating multi-microphone array. Also part of the system will be a technology called Time-of-Flight, which measures how long it takes for photons to bounce off a person or object. Combined, these features promise greater accuracy and precision in detecting your movements and voice commands.

Like its Xbox One counterpart, the Kinect for Windows sensor will be able to pinpoint more parts of the body, opening up more accurate skeletal tracking. The sensor will also use a greater field of view to handle a variety of room sizes. A new infrared feature will help the sensor “see” better, especially in darker conditions.

The launch of the Kinect for Windows sensor and the corresponding software development kit means that developers will be able to create apps that take advantage of the features.

“We’re continuing our commitment to equipping businesses and organizations with the latest natural technology from Microsoft so that they, in turn, can develop and deploy innovative touch-free applications for their businesses and customers,” Microsoft said in a blog post Thursday. “A new Kinect for Windows sensor and software development kit (SDK) are core to that commitment....

Submission + - Debian's oldest developer, Ray Dassen, has died of unknown causes. (thepowerbase.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Debian Project today is mourning the loss of legendary Linux developer Ray Dassen. Ray Dassen served the Linux community and Debian at large for nearly all of Debian’s life, having joined the project in the very beginning working hand-in-hand while the project’s founder, Ian Murdock.

Nobody said computers were going to be polite.