Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Submission + - Faced with a breach, Hypercom screws merchants (hypercom.com)

infernalC writes: "Hypercom, faced with a recently discovered security vulnerability in their Savannah payment software, decided to drop support and terminate the product immediately rather than fix the problem. Credit card processing servers are very mission critical to merchants. Interestingly enough, this comes as their acquisition by VeriFone is held up on anti-trust grounds. VeriFone makes a very similar competing payment platform, PC Charge.

According to the notification, with zero advance notice, the only support they will offer merchants is to uninstall. No refunds if you bought the software before April. How's that for a mission-critical application?"

Wikipedia

Submission + - Release of 33GiB of scientific publications (thepiratebay.org)

An anonymous reader writes: A Wikipedian, Greg Maxwell, has released 33GiB of scientific publications from the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society in response to the arrest of Aaron Swartz for, effectively, downloading too many articles from JSTOR. The release consists of 18,592 scientific articles previously released at $8-$19 each and all published prior to 1923 and so public domain.
Games

Submission + - First NetHack Cross-Variant Summer Tournament (rawrnix.com)

bhaak1 writes: "The first — and hopefully annually — NetHack Cross-Variant Summer Tournament called Junethack has started last Sunday and runs until the end of August 14th.
This tournament features Vanilla NetHack and several of its forks: SporkHack, UnNethack, AceHack and as a special bonus game — never seen on a public server before — NetHack 1.3d, the first version of the game called NetHack, released 1987. There are various achievements to gain, even for those poor souls that can't win this complex and sadistic game.
The source code of the tournament management and website software is available for hacking on GitHub if you prefer hacking code to hacking monsters."

Linux

Submission + - London Stock Exchange Halts Linux Migration (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: Computerworld UK is reporting that human error in 'suspicious circumstances' has caused the London Stock Exchange to postpone its cash markets migration to a Linux-based system, one that was billed as the fastest in the world. The system now will 'not go live until next year, because the LSE previously agreed with markets that it would freeze technological change in December.'
Linux

Submission + - 5 Years Of Linux Kernel Releases Benchmarked (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Phoronix has published benchmarks of the past five years worth of Linux kernel releases, from the Linux 2.6.12 through Linux 2.6.37 (dev) releases. The results from these benchmarks of 26 versions of the Linux kernel show that in fact for several areas the Linux kernel is not getting slower as more features are added, but rather it's improving with few exceptions.
Patents

Submission + - Supreme's throw out Bilski patent (supremecourt.gov)

ciaran_o_riordan writes: The US Supreme Court has finally decided the Bilski case! We've known that Bilski's patent would get thrown out; that was clear from the open mockery from the judges during last November's hearing. The big question is, since rejecting a particular patent requries providing a general test and explaining why this patent fails that test, how broad will their test be? Will it try to kill the plague of software patents? and is their test designed well enough to stand up to the army of patent lawyers who'll be making a science (and a career) of minimising and circumventing it? The judges have created a new test, so this will take some reading before any degree of victory can be declared. The important part is pages 5-16 of the PDF, which is the majority opinion. The End Software Patents campaign is already analysing the decision, and collecting other analyses. Some background is available at Late-comers guide: What is Bilski anyway?.
The Courts

SCO v. Novell Goes To the Jury 67

Excelcia writes "Closing arguments in the six and a bit year old slander of title case between SCO and Novell occurred today and the case is finally in the hands of the jury. It's been an interesting case, with SCO alternately claiming that the copyrights to UNIX did get transferred to them, and that the copyrights should have been transferred to them. 'Judge Ted Stewart said, after the jury left to begin to deliberate, that in all his years on the bench, he's never seen such fine lawyering as in this case.' We're not going to find out the results until at least Tuesday, however, as one juror is taking a long weekend. Great lawyering notwithstanding, we can all hope next week that the Energizer bunny of all spurious lawsuits will finally go away."
Internet Explorer

Submission + - SourceForge.net drops IE 6 support (wkoorts.com) 1

Wayne Koorts writes: "Users of SourceForge.net with any version of Internet Explorer lower than 7 are now simply greeted with the message: "Your browser isn't supported, so some things might not work as expected. Please upgrade to a newer version of IE, or to Firefox.". We're not talking about only minor pixel differences here and there either, the site is quite badly disfigured in IE 6."

Submission + - cfunge 0.4.1 released! (sourceforge.net)

SF:anmaster writes: Major highlights in this release include tracking of exact bounds for Funge Space (option at compile time) and support for disabling some heavy parts of cfunge to reduce memory usage. Many bugs have been fixed as well. See ChangeLog for details. Download URL: https://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=221310&package_id=267309&release_id=680087
The Courts

Submission + - Appeals Court Says RIAA Hearing Can't be Streamed (blogspot.com)

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "The US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit has overturned a lower court order permitting webcast of an oral argument in an RIAA case, SONY BMG Music Entertainment v. Tenenbaum, in Boston. As one commentator put it, the decision gives the RIAA permission to 'cower behind the same legal system they're using to pillory innocent people'. Ironically, the appeals court's own hearing had been webcast, via an mp3 file. The court admitted that this was not an appropriate case for a 'prerogative writ' of 'mandamus', but claimed to have authority to issue a writ of 'advisory mandamus'. The opinion came as a bit of a surprise to me because the judges appeared, during the oral argument, to have a handle on the issues. The decision gave me no such impression. From where I sit, the decision was wrong in a number of respects, among them: (a) it contradicted the plain wording of the district court rule, (b) it ignored the First Amendment implications, and (c) there is no such thing as 'advisory' mandamus or 'advisory' anything — our federal courts are specifically precluded from giving advisory opinions."
Security

Submission + - BBC Hijacks 22,000 PCs In Botnet Demonstration (bbc.co.uk) 2

An anonymous reader writes: "[The BBC] managed to acquire its own low-value botnet — the name given to a network of hijacked computers — after visiting chatrooms on the internet. The programme did not access any personal information on the infected PCs. If this exercise had been done with criminal intent it would be breaking the law. But our purpose was to demonstrate botnets' collective power when in the hands of criminals." The BBC performed a controlled DDoS attack, "then ordered its slave PCs to bombard its target site with requests for access to make it inaccessible."
Portables

Submission + - OLPC set to dump x86 for Arm chips in XO-2 (goodgearguide.com.au) 2

angry tapir writes: "One Laptop Per Child is set to dump x86 processors, instead opting to put low-power Arm-based processors in its next-generation XO-2 laptop with the aim of improving battery life. The nonprofit is "almost" committed to putting the Arm-based chip in the next-generation XO-2 laptop, which is due for release in 18 months, according to Nicholas Negroponte, chairman of OLPC. The XO-1 laptop currently ships with Advanced Micro Devices' aging Geode chip, which is based on an x86 design."
Linux Business

Submission + - Fedora is largest Linux Distro: 100k users/week (wordpress.com)

ruphus13 writes: Fedora 10 is on a tear, and has been picking up new users at the rate of 100k/week. Fedora is the largest Linux distro now. From the article, "Fedora 10 has been gaining new users at impressive rates. This past week alone Fedora 10 has picked up over 100,000 more. This puts the total number of Fedora users somewhere around 12-13 million, higher than any other Linux distribution... At last count, Fedora 10 has a 15% gain in users over Fedora 9. This measurement was taken before this impressive week so the total gain might even be more than that."
Mozilla

Submission + - Sun Slips Firefox Extension Into Java Update (paulcardno.com)

pcardno writes: "It seems it's not just Microsoft that have spotted a good opportunity to distribute their software through Firefox Addons. On installing the latest annoying, sysbar bubble based Java update, my Firefox informed me that I had a wonderful new Java addon automatically. Here's the addon screenshot. Yes, I could opt out of it, but why are Sun installing Addons to my Firefox without me making specific choices in the application itself? To be clear — I have never chosen to install this Addon, yet it has been installed without my permission with the latest Java Update."

Slashdot Top Deals

Politics: A strife of interests masquerading as a contest of principles. The conduct of public affairs for private advantage. -- Ambrose Bierce

Working...