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Comment: Re:sure you want to go with 'undead' ? (Score 1) 283

by ahknight (#47302575) Attached to: Perl Is Undead

That's a good point. I think everyone being sold on Perl 6 fixing Perl 5's issues and then ... not ... left us all with the impression that Perl 5 has issues that would never be fixed, to which we all reacted as one would expect and abandoned it for something else nice and shiny. With their own problems that will never be fixed.

Apple

Apple Intros 17" Unibody MBP, DRM-Free iTunes 1079

Posted by kdawson
from the life-after-jobs dept.
Phil Schiller delivered the keynote at MacWorld, the first after the Steve Jobs era of keynotes. Here is Engadget's live blog. The big news, predicted by many rumor sites, was the introduction of the unibody 17" MacBook Pro. As rumored, the battery is not removable, but it's claimed to provide 8 hours of battery life (7 hours with the discrete graphics): "3x the charges and lifespan of the industry standard." $2,799, 2.66 GHz and 4 GB of RAM, 320GB hard drive, shipping at the end of January. There is a battery exchange program, and there is an option for a matte display. The other big news is that iTunes is going DRM-free: 8M songs today, all 10+M by the end of March. Song pricing will be flexible, as the studios have been demanding; the lowest song price is $0.69. Apple also introduced the beta of a Google Docs-like service, iWork.com.
Television

DTV Coupon Program Out of Money 591

Posted by timothy
from the time-to-nelson-laugh-at-the-government dept.
Thelasko writes "It appears that the US Government's digital converter box program is running out of money. If you sign up after the program runs out of money, you will receive your voucher if the program receives more funding. Older analog televisions will no longer work without a converter box after February 17."
Software

Amazon S3 Adds Option To Make Data Accessors Pay 80

Posted by kdawson
from the by-the-byte dept.
CWmike writes "Amazon.com has rolled out a new option for its Simple Storage Service (S3) that lets data owners shift the cost of accessing their information to users. Until now, individuals or businesses with information stored on S3 had to pay data-transfer costs to Amazon when others made use of the information. Amazon said the new Requester Pays option relieves data providers of that burden, leaving them to pay only the basic storage fees for the cloud computing service. The bigger question with the cloud is, who really pays? Mark Everett Hall argues that IT workers do."
The Almighty Buck

+ - When local humiliation is not enough....

Submitted by
ezratrumpet
ezratrumpet writes "How many years of therapy are necessary to get over:
  • 1. Your father buying a team for you to play on;
  • 2. Your father buying a whole bunch of other teams so your team can have a league;
  • 3. Your father firing the coaches for changing your playing position, making you a scapegoat when your team misses the playoffs;
  • 4. National exposure of the fiasco in the Washington Post; or,
  • 5. All of the above?
Some shrink could retire on this one."
Space

+ - Mercury to Cross Sun on Wednesday

Submitted by
Epyllion
Epyllion writes "An infrequent astronomical sight — tiny Mercury inching across the surface of the sun — takes place Wednesday afternoon in North America. But you'll need the right kind of telescope to see it.

Mercury is so tiny — 1/194th the size of the sun — and looking at the sun is so dangerous to the eyes that viewing must be done with a properly outfitted telescope or online telescope cameras, experts say.

Still, for many people, it may be the only chance to see the closest planet to the sun, said Michelle Nichols, a master educator at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, one of many places that will hold special viewings of Mercury's trek. Mercury is usually seen in the early evening, but it's often obscured by buildings, city lights and trees, she said.

Read More"
Privacy

+ - SSN disclosures and the law

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "I recently recieved an email from a US based publicly traded company that I used for income tax services. The content of the email was a screenshot which prominently displayed my SSN. I expressed concern to the company that they chose to send this information over the web in an unencrypted format. The company's response was to offer a verbal apology, explain that it was a one time violation of company policy, and offer a year of credit monitoring service. I think their mishandling of an SSN probably would result in some legal trouble for the company if reported to the government. What sort of fines/other punishment is the company liable for in this case if pursued in court? I'm trying to decide if it's worthwhile to sue them or take the monitoring service and let it go."

It is surely a great calamity for a human being to have no obsessions. - Robert Bly

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