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Comment: Re:And no one will go to jail (Score 4, Insightful) 215

The way I see it, if they don't go for prosecution, they've more or less given these agencies carte blanche to violate the law, lie about it, and have no consequences.

Welcome to the American legal system, where selective prosecution is standard operating procedure. The only reason to have a legal system which does not require prosecution for known crimes is to permit treating some people differently than others. It leads to the proliferation of bad laws.

Comment: Re:Have you actually been to China? (Score 1) 102

by drinkypoo (#47575337) Attached to: Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

You do realise the US does exactly this as well, and the prisons are corporations, and America even has more prisoners.

And? I didn't say the US didn't have any of these elements. I said that China did.

Posting ac as I spent all my mod points before reading this complete rubbish.

I note you didn't actually disagree with me. Obviously it isn't complete rubbish.

Comment: Re:Minimal Alert (Score 1) 181

by Minwee (#47575059) Attached to: "BadUSB" Exploit Makes Devices Turn "Evil"

NOTICE: USB DEVICES CONNECTED
The following devices have been connected to USB bus 5:
Device 0, Device ID="0123:4567", Manufacturer="Harmless USB Devices, Inc", DeviceClass="Hub", DeviceProtocol="Full speed hub"
Device 1, Device ID="0123:4567", Manufacturer="Harmless USB Devices, Inc", InterfaceClass="Mass Storage", InterfaceProtocol="Bulk Only"
Device 2, Device ID="0000:0000", Manufacturer="What is this", InterfaceClass="Human Interface Device", InterfaceProtocol="Keyboard"
Device 3, Device ID="0000:0000", Manufacturer="I don't even", InterfaceClass="Communications Device", InterfaceProtocol="AT-Commands", Interface="HSPA+ Mobile Broadband Modem"

The information is already there if you know where to look for it. All that would be required would be to put it into a notification window that attracts a bit more attention. It wouldn't prevent this kind of attack -- that would require user consent for activating any new devices, and be bit challenging if that was your only functional keyboard -- but it would force naughty USB devices masquerading as harmless purveyors of porn^H^H^H^H useful business-related data to tip their hands when they try doing something they shouldn't.

Comment: Re:So China is going to do (Score 1) 102

by drinkypoo (#47574349) Attached to: Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

So, non-free dependencies? Not on my watch!

The specifications for the required ammunition are well-known. The stuff is harder to make than the firearm, however. For that to differ you'll have to use something substantially higher- or lower-tech, e.g. caseless or black powder. And caseless ammo is only easier to produce if you disregard the difficulty of producing a practical propellant.

Comment: Re:Have you actually been to China? (Score 1) 102

by drinkypoo (#47573739) Attached to: Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

Slave labor? 'Fraid not.

The Chinese government itself literally operates labor camps where criminals are forced to produce consumer goods.

Your argument would be more credible

You clearly do not decide who is credible when you say that slave labor is not slave labor.

Comment: Re:So China is going to do (Score 1) 102

by drinkypoo (#47573723) Attached to: Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

RMS doesn't do guns because only one or two are open-source, and he's seen the code and knows they're shitty.

The 1911 is Open Source today, you can literally download blueprints for every part of the weapon. It's one of the best-loved and best-performing firearms of all time. It does require the use of appropriate ammunition, but the openness of the design has permitted developers to adapt it to several different types.

Comment: Re:So! The game is rigged! (Score 1) 559

by Loki_1929 (#47572593) Attached to: 35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

I don't pay interest on my credit cards and they pay me cash back. I use the reward points and cash back for free vacations. I financed my last car at below the rate of inflation. Adjusted for inflation, the bank paid *me* for the privilege of buying me a car.

It isn't a scam; it's a game. And rule number 1 is understand basic mathematics.

Comment: Re:So! The game is rigged! (Score 1) 559

by Loki_1929 (#47572577) Attached to: 35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

I pay for everything cash, so I have a low credit score.
How the fuck does that work?

Your credit score is the calculated chances that you'll stick to the terms if credit is offered. It's based on past performance and present (credit-based) circumstances. If you have no history, they can't score you. That's how the fuck that works.

I paid for my car cash, I pay my rent cash, I pay the cable company cash.
I have over $30k in the bank and I have monthly paychecks.

None of this hits your credit report, so it can't be used to score you. Money in the bank isn't reported and isn't scored. Paychecks and income aren't reported and aren't scored.

So I should have a much higher credit rating than someone who is constantly paying with credit cards in my opinion.
I wouldn't even mind so much, except that when renting a house they do a background check, and they expect to find a credit history, which I don't have.

Someone who is paying with credit cards and is keeping those accounts paid as agreed has a demonstrated history of responsibly managing their credit. You don't have that. That's why they score higher. You seem to want a credit score that's based on some personal knowledge of you, or your handshake, or a magic 8 ball or something. But that isn't how it works because we no longer live in villages of 20 families. Various items related to how you've handled credit/debt are reported to credit reporting agencies. Other companies (okay, pretty much just FICO) have developed various scoring models that take the information reported to the CRAs and turn that information into a single, simple number which represents the chances that you'll stick to the terms of credit is offered. Since they don't have any information about you, you don't get scored.

I pay for everything with credit cards, pay them off every month so there's no interest, and then I take free vacations with the reward points and cash back money. I have a long credit history showing that whenever someone provides me credit, I manage it responsibly and pay them on time as agreed. If someone is thinking about offering me credit, they can look at that long history (or just the number) and see that I'm a pretty safe bet. They can look at someone else who has a long history of failing to pay back everyone who lends them a dime and see that person is a huge risk. They look at you and they see a mystery box. What exactly would you expect to happen?

Comment: Re:You needn't charge anything (Score 1) 559

by Loki_1929 (#47572543) Attached to: 35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

No need to look up how FICO works, no one actually uses FICO when considering you.

Except for credit cards, car loans, mortgages; just about anything that requires credit. But yeah, except for those things, nobody actually uses FICO.

There are many many systems to calculate a credit score and if you go apply for a loan/credit card/anything that gives you a score from 5 different places the same day you'll get 5 different credit scores and the difference has nothing to do with recent credit inquiries.

Just wrong time and time again. First of all, there aren't 5 different places. There are 3: Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian. Secondly, there are multiple types of FICO scores and the lender chooses which type to use. Auto-enhanced FICO scores weigh vehicle loans differently, but are otherwise very similar to the consumer FICO score you can pull. Most differences between scores from different CRAs are due to differences in the credit reports themselves. Often times, accounts (in good standing or otherwise) aren't reported to all three CRAs, which means you'll have different histories and different scores with them. And yes, there are other proprietary models available, but they're hardly ever used (as in 10% of the time).

When it comes to applying for credit, FICO is still the kind of the castle precisely because it does adapt and broadly predict consumer behavior, allowing lenders to appropriately price risk.

Comment: Re:You needn't charge anything (Score 1) 559

by Loki_1929 (#47572507) Attached to: 35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

First off, 60% credit utilization is too high. I haven't looked up the numbers recently, but there are people out there who game the system and have figured out near optimal values.

Depends on the scoring model and your personal 'bucket', but the optimal is typically 9% total utilization for revolving accounts. Keep in mind that certain scoring models (TU98 comes to mind) want that all on one revolving account. Any more and you'll lose the small bit of bonus you get for having the balance at all. That said, the typical bump to credit score is often less than 10 points. It can be used for a temporary bump prior to seeking big credit or for bragging rights, but honestly, you're just about as well off paying everything to zero each month prior to CRA reporting.

He keeps differentiating, flying off on a tangent.

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