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Comment: Re:Absolutely correct! (Score 1) 155

by d3vi1 (#48541553) Attached to: Romanian Officials Say Russia Finances European Fracking Protests

Would you please point to a study that states that fracking wells have a higher incidence of water contamination than normal classic oil or gas wells? Traditionally Romanian gas exploration has used hydraulic fracturing. The only difference is that we are now drilling deeper, as well as horizontally and we can exploit more from an existing deposit. To give you an idea: right now, out of all the electricity produced in Romania, only 39% is carbon producing (coal, heating oil, gas), the rest is non carbon producing (hydro, wind, nuclear, photovoltaic, biomass). You can see the real-time information on http://www.transelectrica.ro/w... . You an also see historical values http://www.transelectrica.ro/w... .
Romania has gone through a complete overhaul of it's energy sources in the past 20 years. We have an installed capacity of 23GW with a power usage between 4GW (low point in summer) and 9GW (max point in winter). In the past 10 years we've added 2,5GW of wind turbines (completely absent until then), and 1GW of photovoltaic. Since we still need gas (for now) and have ample reserves, why should we import from our "old adversary" instead of using our own?

Businesses

Why CurrentC Will Beat Out Apple Pay 631

Posted by timothy
from the some-downsides-might-strike-your-mind dept.
itwbennett writes Working closely with VISA, Apple solved many complex security issues making in-person payments safer than ever. But it's that close relationship with the credit card companies that may be Apple Pay's downfall. A competing solution called CurrentC has recently gained a lot of press as backers of the project moved to block NFC payments (Apple Pay, Google Wallet, etc.) at their retail terminals. The merchants designing or backing CurrentC reads like a greatest hits list of retail outfits and leading the way is the biggest of them all, Walmart. The retailers have joined together to create a platform that is independent of the credit card companies and their profit-robbing transaction fees. Hooking directly to your bank account rather than a credit or debit card, CurrentC will use good old ACH to transfer money from your account to the merchant's bank account at little to no cost.

Comment: Re:its their own fault (Score 1) 280

by BlueMonk (#48050177) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes To Drag Queens Over "Real Name" Rule
Changing your legal name for anything except marriage is much harder in some states than changing it for marriage. The process seems streamlined for marriage because it's so common, but is sometimes prohibitively difficult and/or expensive in other cases. I see this decision as Facebook wanting to be like one of the "easier" states and be available that way to people in all states regardless of how hard it is to change your legal name there. Kudos if they can accomplish that goal without significantly compromising the integrity of peoples' identities in other ways.

Comment: Re:its their own fault (Score 1) 280

by BlueMonk (#48050083) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes To Drag Queens Over "Real Name" Rule
I think the point is to limit you in virtual space to the same number of identities you have in reality. You only have one body, and so Facebook wants you to have one identity with them. Even a schizophrenic has to accept the fact that their many personalities have to share the same body, and, just like their body, Facebook can't automatically adjust to their new identity as it comes forward. So they have to pick a single identity through which to present themselves to others, even if they are separate internally. Cross dressers similarly have to make a choice. You only get one identity, so make it the one you want to share with everyone. You can either be transgender or not, not both... pick one identity to share with others, and make it the one you're sharing in reality.

Comment: Re:its their own fault (Score 1) 280

by BlueMonk (#48049865) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes To Drag Queens Over "Real Name" Rule
I've heard from people in the transgender community that often times it's much harder to change your name outside the context of marriage than inside. I think this is because the process is streamlined for marriages because they are so common. The process is not at all streamlined for transgender name changes (at least in some states).

Comment: Re:catering to the mentally ill (Score 1) 280

by BlueMonk (#48049743) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes To Drag Queens Over "Real Name" Rule

No on can know what it's like to be someone else.

Exactly. They were born only knowing how to fit into society as a gender that conflicts with their anatomy. And they can't pretend that they are the gender that they were assigned at birth because they don't know how to be someone else. I know 3 transgender women, and from what I understand of their tales, their choices were basically suicide or gender transition because they simply could not live with the gender they were assigned based on their anatomy.

Comment: Re:catering to the mentally ill (Score 1) 280

by BlueMonk (#48046793) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes To Drag Queens Over "Real Name" Rule
I think you misunderstand what it means to be transgender. Although "Drag Queens" may make a show of their situation, which might imply some degree of pretense, to be transgender in itself is not to be mentally ill nor does it generally involve any pretense (it's not "fake"). People who are transgender generally experience great emotional and psychological turmoil over their condition (which might lead to other mental illnesses) before finding out that the source of it all is a mismatch between their birth-assigned gender and their self-identified gender. But once these are aligned, they're much better off and can live much more normal lives. The transition, however, can be very difficult, especially when laws and rules don't support the transition (name change, gender change, etc).

Comment: Re:its their own fault (Score 1, Insightful) 280

by BlueMonk (#48046187) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes To Drag Queens Over "Real Name" Rule

So I would be okay with Rue Paul getting a pass but to give it to just one group is wrong.

It's not wrong if the one group who's getting the exception represents the group who's unfairly burdened by the original requirement. I'm not clear whether you're supporting or against the decision, but transgender people are unfairly burdened by a requirement of using their birth name when that doesn't agree with the different name they're getting most people (hoping eventually everyone) to use in the real world.

Comment: Re:Switch to Solaris... seriously... (Score 1) 195

by d3vi1 (#47653285) Attached to: Facebook Seeks Devs To Make Linux Network Stack As Good As FreeBSD's

I remember seeing at some point numbers. It didn't impress in a single thread, but could easily saturate a 10Gb link in multi-threaded tests. They tested an FTP server on a T2plus. Regarding cores, we have anything from dual UltraSPARC IIIi to T4 based systems including some M-class. I believe the T3-4 has the highest number of cores. It should be 64 cores and 512 threads, but a single Solaris instance can only see 256. I believe that the M9000 and M9000-64 should have the same problem, but the biggest M series I've worked with is M8000.

Comment: Re:Switch to Solaris... seriously... (Score 0) 195

by d3vi1 (#47620553) Attached to: Facebook Seeks Devs To Make Linux Network Stack As Good As FreeBSD's

While I'm a Solaris admin for some time, I can tell you that it's not the best TCP/IP stack. It does have all the bells and whistles, but it's not even close to the speed of FreeBSD. It's actually not even in the same ballpark as FreeBSD. It's probably Linux fast if you tune it properly. It does have cool configuration, virtual switches, link aggregations, hardware crypto that can be usable by OpenSSL, OpenSSH, and ipsec but it's not even close speed-wise. But the cost of all those features basically means that it has mediocre performance for simple, yet performance-hungry scenarios.

Comment: Re: Local testing works? (Score 1) 778

by BlueMonk (#47509747) Attached to: States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth

All you said was that other evidence could be used to prove the crime and wouldn't be needed from the person accused. Well of course that gets around the 5th Amendment issue. What the hell is your point?

Almost -- I said that if other evidence proves the employer's guilt of hiring illegally, then the employer's evidence would serve only to exonerate them of charges of paying below minimum wage. ("[...] allow them to provide that evidence after their guilt [...] is determined from others' evidence as a way to reduce the consequences," I said.)

My point being that, by avoiding the potential for 5th amendment problems in this way, it looks like the idea still has merit: illegal immigrants could cry foul when they are being paid less than minimum wage because they wouldn't have to fear losing that income as part of being deported if the burden of proof of wages is on the employer and the burden of proof of employment is on the worker. And thanks to the clarification, the employer's burden of proof shouldn't incriminate them more than they already are. I don't doubt that there are other problems with the idea, but I think, with this clarification or adjustment, it can at least avoid the 5th amendment concerns you raised.

My reasons for continuing the conversation are not just about "winning" but about coming to an understanding, I can't do that without questioning your reasoning. I don't mean to sound adversarial, but that's very difficult when reacting to such agressive replies. I didn't immediately understand why you thought the employer providing evidence of wages was a 5th amendment issue, but with further discussion I came to an understanding that you thought the evidence provided by the employer would also incriminate them on their illegal employment. So that understanding helped the idea evolve.

Normally I would be up for working out other issues, but I think our styles of discourse clash violently and I don't think I'm up for much more of this, if you'll excuse me :).

Comment: Re: Local testing works? (Score 1) 778

by BlueMonk (#47506509) Attached to: States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth
No, I'm not letting you play such cheap tactical tricks. You can give up or accuse me of misunderstanding you, but don't pretend I'm the one playing tactical games and only interested in winning when I adjusted my plan per the issue you exposed and you're the one ending the discussion with unanswered questions. I finally understood why you thought there was a 5th amendment issue, and responded with a way around it by postponing the need for evidence. Why is it so hard to have an honest civil discussion without all these games?

Comment: Re:Local testing works? (Score 1) 778

by BlueMonk (#47500835) Attached to: States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth
It's not clear to me that this problem is different under the proposed rules than it is now. Illegal immigrants would already be depressing wages on jobs that would pay above minimum wage in the current system. So maybe the plan doesn't fix *that* problem, but I don't see it making it any worse.

What the world *really* needs is a good Automatic Bicycle Sharpener.

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