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Comment Re:Pffft (Score 1) 71

Most business' neither need nor use a real time O/S. All applications that allocate random blocks of memory must find a way to deal with garbage collection, built-in GC makes it easy for the coder. Manual GC just means the coder must manage memory himself, which is mandatory on a proper real time O/S.

Comment Re:Short FPC history and goals overview (Score 1) 71

The summary says: "Twenty-three years ago, development started on the first version of the Turbo Pascal and later also Delphi-compatible Free Pascal Compiler" Perhaps you should re-read the summary, your paraphrase edits out the bit that makes all the difference???

Comment Re:Private companies don't do exploration of front (Score 1) 314

And their colony failed. The Spanish, Portuguese, English and French colonies in the New World succeeded because the governments that ran those colonies backed them financially and militarily. At least in the case of the English, owners/shareholders of colonials often received economic monopolies, giving them substantial impetus to make colonies economically viable in fairly short order.

And even though colonies could obviously become self-sustaining in pretty short order, they still required a significant amount of protection from the colonial power, and the colonial powers served as the route to accessing markets.

The Vikings experiments in colonization as private endeavors were mixed successes at best, and ultimately only Iceland survived as a successful colonial enterprise by the early Modern era, with the North American and Greenland colonies failing (though the Greenland colony did manage to hang on for several centuries).

There are probably any number of reasons; less than hospitable sites for colonization that were vulnerable to climactic changes at the top, but also the more limited means of making such colonies economically viable. At least in the North American attempts, the native peoples may have played a roll as well. The Norse simply didn't have the resources at their disposal that the Colonial Powers could bring to bear when they started seizing the New World. The Norse were hardly better equipped than the Inuit and Native Americans they encountered, whereas the Spaniards, French and English had firearms and much larger numbers.

Comment Re:The dark matter between their ears (Score 1) 158

But no one says it doesn't exist locally. Quite the opposite, everyone thinks it does. It's just fucking hard to see.

It's not that cosmologists aren't willing to look at GR, and certainly are, but no potential quantum theory of gravity suggests an alternative to dark matter. And considering we all know there is physics beyond the Standard Model, and the potential for currently only hypothetical or even unpredicted particles, the idea that we should just toss out one of the most successful scientific theories in history because we're confronted with what looks like a lot of extra mass seems absurd.

But I get it. There is a certain type of person, underachievers mainly, whose only contribution to any discussion is to find the gaps in our knowledge and then proclaim researchers in those fields retards. It's pathetic, and contributes absolutely nothing.

Comment Space-based Economy (Score 2) 314

In the very long run, probably. But I think there's probably a route to increasing space exploration and utilization by explicitly avoiding the cost of Earth-to-orbit transport costs. The plan I've seen that has some promise goes as follows:

1. Find some metal-rich and volatiles-rich asteroids and comets (not exactly rare in the Asteroid Belt). Tow these asteroids into a near-Earth orbit and begin extraction and smelting.
2. Set up manufacturing facilities in Earth orbit to build spacecraft and satellites.
2a. We could even "grow" plastics with bacteria or genetically-engineered plants.
3 ....
4. Profit!

In all seriousness, if you created a parallel space-based economy whose sole purpose is to make transporting anything but humans into space, then the whole question of how to make Earth-to-orbit transport cheaper ceases to be an issue. Obviously the startup costs and R&D for such a project are monumental, but in the long run, the rewards would be huge. The whole point of commercial spaceflight is to find a way to make it economically feasible, and this is about actually creating a space-based economy.

Mommy, what happens to your files when you die?