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Comment What's the wide-spread use of Watson for medicine? (Score 1) 53

Throwing out the idea that this is going to make radiologists jobs and half of their depended employed medical-field co-worker obsolete is kind of far fetched IMHO. I've lived in some pretty big urban areas down to po-dunk no-where and I've never had a diagnosis or analysis done with Watson. It's probably more with my sheer lack of knowledge on the topic and 'real' (not theoretical or proof-of-concept uses) of Watson in the real world. Maybe I'm the outlier here, but I've honestly never experienced them first hand (and no I'm not counting e-medicine or skype-like appointments). Has anyone else?

I support remote sensing science applications and regardless of how much image processing, trained models and HPC crush power for analysis we do, most of the scientist in our GIS department still prefer human analysis with the naked eye as the final approval. Not that GIS is anything close to medical field, but from a pure analysis perspective, human processing and interpretation still rule those domains.

The only real cool thing I've seen Watson do in my life is play an impressive game of Jeopardy and quite honestly, I wish it would have blasted Trebek SNL style. I hate that pompous guy.

Comment Re: What happened to basic training standards? (Score 1) 86

Ah. You're right. I was always viewed as a "hell of a good guy" vs "model soldier". You took more slanted patriotic stock in my opinion than it took me to give a shit to read yours.

One thing I did learn is how not to be a coward, than post as one and be a poser troll, to boot. Back to your cave, Taliban troll.

Comment What happened to basic training standards? (Score 4, Interesting) 86

Ah how the U.S. Military has softened up. I remember pushups, kick in the helmet, and more pushups, sweat in the eyes, drill sergeant fear and pushups to correct my shooting posture and shaking.

I am sure it is a cool corrective tool to use, but its a crutch. But we have been shooting guns for centuries and using less-than-accurate firearms than we have now, its a matter of attention, caring and wanting to be good with your firearm.

And icing on the cake: When I was in the 'motherland' for OIF, it was a great feeling to know I had good shooting mechanics and trusted my shot. I couldn't imagine being in the military and sucking at that.

Comment Very sad, indeed. (Score 4, Insightful) 140

I better speak to this in past tense or some troll is going to attack me...

I was a big google code project user, have a handful of projects on there plus commit to quite a few professional ones as well. It's really sad to see it go. It's not really a matter of how trendy, popular and intuitive Github is and has become (google code had git functionality and you choice of svn or mercurial), I thought google code was merely fine and met the requirement.

The overall sucky part is it was a intuitive service. It worked. It was reliable for everyday project work. I don't think I ever had any problems with it. I hate to see things that worked well on the internetz go away at the cost of popularity and newhat trends.

RIP code.google.com. May I be so lucky to see you on archive.org afterlife?

Comment That 'Jonny Lee Miller' Character at it again! (Score 1) 105

Superficial garbage and just a bunch of shock-jock reporting crap again. Forget whatever 'security experts' were brought on, I would have been thoroughly entertained to see an official 'Hackers' reunion with Jonny Lee Miller, Angelina Jolie and alike giving in-character input and play-by-play, then end the segment with "Indeed. RISC architecture is gonna change everything"

Comment The only thing constant is change (Score 5, Interesting) 171

I read Matt's blog posting and I do have to say it sounds like his underlying issue is less of a quandary with a code renaissance being over and more of the drowning complexy and exhaustion involved with today's changing technology world from a code slingers perspective. Reading his blurb touching on a few profound things I find myself doing more and more as I get older in the tech industry: enjoying the simplicity of hacking shell or automative code in a text editor without launching an IDE, still having algorithmic thought processes and approaches, documenting less and thinking more. It sounds like his interests have just shifted and probably for the better. There's tons of shit that I look at on my shelves: projects started, topics heavily bookmarked in myriad of O'reilly books, half-finished circuit design on breadboards, code lying around here or there. It's just that: what was important now isn't and you're trying to just simplify the black hole of tech that was once an intriguing and mind-blowing ordeal.

Comment Hardware Evolution Blues (Score 1) 202

Although I appreciate the changes in the B+ model and board layout changes, it does kind of suck that the natural improvement evolution of the Raspberry Pi is wiping out the 'coolness' I have with the three (what seems to feel like) aging Raspberry Pi original model B's (256MB version) I own from back in ~2011 into early 2012.

I'm still trying to appreciate them for what they are, so I'll still get the mileage out of them. $35 isn't a high price tag, but to upgrade 'X' of them all to chase small features is going to create very unstable 12oz beer bottle coasters over time with little used market re-coup costs.

Comment What about the SysAdmin? (Score 2) 226

Horrible assumption that you think developers are top-dogs, Jeff. I've seen many cases were DevOps role FAILED for competent developers because, in the cases I've seen, this is true:

* Your smartest developer may be just that when it comes to language, software architecture and platform development, but their operating system, networking, hardware infrastructure knowledge + background is not even hobby-shop at best.

* They've always had an ops or engineering crew to throw their code at, figure out how to integrate it, and NEVER had to support it.

* Ego problems thinking they are 'above' remedial automation --- which most of the time doesn't involve a real development language, just scripting.

Out of those two things alone, I've always heard the: "Well we need a sys-admin/engineer now because we are spending more time trying to manage systems, not really sure how or what to automate, and it's really taking time away from me getting back to the kind of development I, as the developer want to do." Which is the polar opposite of the two points I mentioned above.

Comment Re:This just shows that criminals are stupid (Score 2) 547

The only thing criminal about this is what he's being charged with from a federal law perspective; his actions were just that: stupid. He was going to gain perhaps 24 more hours of study time to get out of a final exam. Using tor was a good idea until you originate it on a campus network --- someone who knew just enough to be microscopically dangerous on the internet. If articles are being written to use tor to make my personal activities on the internet harder for the NSA to correlate, it's gotta be the one-and-only tool right?

Leave your smart phone at the dorm, give your student ID to a conspirator and have them badge you in at the library, use a laptop you temporarily bought at Walmart 2 weeks ago (which has an excellent return policy within 15 days opened or not), then take a taxi (or walk) down to a local area with free wifi (outside a budget hotel, coffee house or there are still dinks who have open APs), use a fake mac address, and do what you need to do. Kid criminals these days.

I'm sure some slashdotter will bullet-hole that remark, but for making a digital bomb thread 'these days' I'd say you have to at least do that if you were on such a mission to do so. What happened to the "my immediate family member is suddenly ill? I must go see them for a day" excuse? I've never used that personally, but surely you start small and don't play the final ace right away.

Comment Really? Give it a break. (Score 4, Interesting) 92

Man, I am so sick of this 're-birth' crap from Fedora. I liked Fedora 'core' back 7+ years ago before we had to be this uber bleeding edge -slash- agile uber aggressive build cycle that fucks everything up and obsoletes distribution usage to about 6 months.

When it was 'just' an upstream snapshot look to what RedHat Enterprise was going to be in the future, I was totally cool with that, and it melded nicely in a lot of environments. But that spin-off has become such a damn mess now with developer heavy ideas that, in some case, go against every foundation of a traditional UNIX-like operating system design, I could really give who shits what the do now.

Making a 'one-size-fits-all' OS is, pain and simple: a horrible idea. I don't want a damn highly integrated OS that I can use for everything. You'll never get that right, and some 'next-in-line' guy they give 5 minutes of talk time at the next conference will say the same thing.

When you take shit, and try and re-invent it with only shit, I'm sure everyone knows the result you get.

Comment Re:You should have told me it existed! (Score 1) 187

Boo Anon Cow! You must be 15. It's ok, us dinosaurs understand. JK.

Geeks.com (or compgeeks.com which is where I initially discovered them back in circa '98) is/was totally awesome. I bought new or refurbished from them and never had a problem at all. It was one of those 'shop-all' places for yester-new hardware, which IMHO, holds ALOT of merit against shops like newegg and a like today that only house 'latest-and-greatest' and have a pretty short shelf life for old tech. If I needed to find a CPU type to max out an old motherboard to give it's last 'spark' of useful life, or some obscure bargain-basement item that was worth the handful of dollars to try out, it was perfect. It was one of those places you could definitely depend on having that 'focused' item you were looking for in the end-consumer PC hardware market.

Thanks again for everything, Geeks.com. Sad to see you go.

Comment Re:...wont make me shop at "traditional" (Score 2) 678

Couldn't agree more. I do prefer online purchasing for those very reasons myself. I think it also comes down to simply getting the 'best' deal, and if that's brick-and-mortar or online with 2-day S&H, that's what it is. I think there's also some convenience in there, too, especially if there's something you want. It's all what you are willing to pay for that item you want, need or can't live without. I know it's not going to break the bank for me to pay the 5-7% sales tax on items online, I just hope that the prices online still stay competitive and don't stick it to the consumer, otherwise it honestly won't make a bit of difference to me anymore.

All in all, I'm indifferent on the sales tax dilemma and I've came to the conclusion that this internet place isn't really a fun place anymore...

"The geeks shall inherit the earth." -- Karl Lehenbauer

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