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Comment Re:For those bitching about the "Special Editions" (Score 1) 423

If you're concerned about legality, just be sure you own the most recent Blu-Rays- much is based on those, and if you have an edit of a product you own (the Blu-Ray), that's totally legal.

No it's not, unfortunately. The edited version is still a derivative work, and it is illegal without the permission of the copyright holder, even if you own the original. It is not considered fair use. People have tried that argument in court in the past, and lost.

Comment Re:Shoddy Workmanship (Score 1) 182

Couldn't agree more. You can thank bootstrap + CMS for that crowd.

And not just web development, but 'true' professionals all-around. So maybe this makes me appear pretentious, but I feel I work pretty hard to know all the tech hats I wear and do wherever I work that mix across all those specific job titles ITFA, but case in point: There's ALOT of self-proclaimed 'professionals' that are hobby-shop single-tech-specializers, one-dimensional in skills and horrible (I mean, HORRIBLE) at their job. It's not surprising most are unemployed if you're a poser and a resident shitbag expert in nothing. Tell me a sys-admin that doesn't need to know about network administration? Tell me a network-admin that doesn't need to know multiple OS's and their supporting TCP stack for tuning? Tell any IT related field that shouldn't know at least ONE type of scripting/programming language (low or high-level) to be better and more efficient/effective to their job? Many don't and that's why they make up that 5%.

I agree some markets and areas are harder to stay employed in with a cut-throat/downsizing/outsourcing mentality, but that still doesn't warrant always consistently being on the chopping block side of things.

Comment Ever thought of a wiki? (Score 1) 227

Many years ago, I started taking all my 'text-editor-alike' notes, setup up a wiki (dokuwiki plug, but there's definitely others like Mediawiki, ect.) and added a bit of light wiki markup to them equaled instant, half-ass-looking pro-like documentation with an authentication/group control wrapper around it (e.g. local accounts or AD/LDAP tie-in).

I don't know what organization you are in or what you can/cannot setup on a whim --- but that's what I'd do. It's SUPER cool to hear you actually care about documentation and daily note taking, ect., but the step beyond IMHO is a searchable and share-able interface to it.

And even taking documentation with you is a cinch --- I just recently changed jobs and I was able to take 8+ years worth of documentation/notes/you-name-it that wasn't company specific or had a NDA attached to it, tarball it up, set up a new wiki, unpack it and I was done.

At most if you really hate the wiki, just write a few reg-ex commands to mostly strip off your markup business and you're left with what you've started: ASCII text files again.

Comment Re:Why should? (Score 1) 397

ABS = I don't need to learn basic car control techniques.

I agree with most of your post but not this one. In fact I think it contradicts your main point that people can't do what they don't practice. Expecting people to remember and apply correct emergency braking techniques in the few seconds they have to react during a panic-inducing situation, despite never having the opportunity to practice them never worked all that well. It is unrealistic for the same reason that expecting people to be able to manually control of a normally autonomous car in an emergency situation is unrealistic.

Comment Out of touch educators or just obtuse? (Score 1) 956

This is really unfortunate to see this happen and it's really no wonder why this kid got chastised for this. I'm sure it boiled down to this: Kid proud of his achievement (regardless if his own classmates were going to grapple the concept of what he did or not), . Heck, name one kid you didn't know that wanted to show something they bought/got/made/received to show their friends or a teacher they lookup to; my kids do it ALL THE TIME. Now with the larger population, not everyone is bringing in home-brew EE projects, but the majority of us can wrap out minds around what we're presented with. Get something slightly technical or outside our metal capacity or comfort zone and everyone starts shitting themselves and crying chicken little.

What you never hear in these situations is a success story where teacher/educator saw mind-blowing potential in this that their school system was never (repeat, NEVER) going to aide this student in, reached out to some maker group in the city and got the kid and his parents introduced and/or involved. Nope, we just see school board dick swinging to the 3rd degree and toss the quick-to-use endangerment card.

I wish I was dabbling with EE at 14 vs early 20's and I'm sure glad my boss hasn't labeled me a metal-box-bomb-toting-going-postal-terrorist and fired me for the nixie tube clock I am staring at right now while typing this.

Comment Don't require a computer (Score 4, Insightful) 508

Are any of my assumptions wrong? Are there any other options I'm not considering?

Yes, you shouldn't design your curriculum assuming students will have limitless access to a computer and internet. Don't have paper turned in online, print out resources to pass out to the student, show the videos in class, and make the amount of typing such that it can be done on school/library computers without excessive burden. There is nothing about learning the English language that requires a computer.

Comment Re:The cars can detect gestures. (Score 1) 236

Yeah, I had a cop put his signal on in the middle of a construction zone where there were barrels blocking both the shoulder and the median. I pulled over at the end of the construction and he was pissed that I waited so long. I guess he wanted me to just stop in the middle of the lane. Then again he was also insistent that I must be stoned, and was interrogating me as to why I was in his city when my car is registered in a different county, all over a dead tail-light, so it was probably just him.

Comment What's the wide-spread use of Watson for medicine? (Score 1) 53

Throwing out the idea that this is going to make radiologists jobs and half of their depended employed medical-field co-worker obsolete is kind of far fetched IMHO. I've lived in some pretty big urban areas down to po-dunk no-where and I've never had a diagnosis or analysis done with Watson. It's probably more with my sheer lack of knowledge on the topic and 'real' (not theoretical or proof-of-concept uses) of Watson in the real world. Maybe I'm the outlier here, but I've honestly never experienced them first hand (and no I'm not counting e-medicine or skype-like appointments). Has anyone else?

I support remote sensing science applications and regardless of how much image processing, trained models and HPC crush power for analysis we do, most of the scientist in our GIS department still prefer human analysis with the naked eye as the final approval. Not that GIS is anything close to medical field, but from a pure analysis perspective, human processing and interpretation still rule those domains.

The only real cool thing I've seen Watson do in my life is play an impressive game of Jeopardy and quite honestly, I wish it would have blasted Trebek SNL style. I hate that pompous guy.

Comment Re: Worst of both worlds (Score 4, Informative) 93

I seriously doubt that. I only have global sales number, not US specific, but there are many online retailers that are larger. Newegg had around $2.7 billion in revenue in 2013. The same year Amazon had $68 billion, Apple had $18 billion, Staples and Walmart both had around $10 billion in online sales. Sears (a company that every talks about as dieing) and QVC (yes the website for that crappy home marketing TV station) both had nearly $5 billion in revenue. Even among consumer electronics CDW and Best Buy had more online sales at over $3 billion each. And again, while these are global numbers, most of those companies are US based, with strong US sales.

Newegg is one of hundreds of online retailers of simular size. While it is a great company, it's adoption of bitcoin is by no means an indication that something has gone mainstream.


Comment Re:Possible but rather unlikely I think (Score 1) 252

but also because autonomous cars are more likely to be shared and constantly in use, rather than sitting in your driveway 90% of the time.

I'm not convinced of this one either. Possible but hardly a certainty. A lot of people don't really like to share cars and nobody rides the bus because they like it. I can see automated cars getting abused rather badly. Trash, bodily fluids, etc. People don't tend to respect property that isn't theirs. I really don't look forward to the prospect of taxing an automated taxi that smells of urine or worse.

And it doesn't work for the borrowers either. If people make their cars available for use when they don't need them, then that will mean that most cars will only be available for use during times of low demand, and will be occupied during time of high demand. With that availability, shared cars will barely dent the existing taxi and public transportation systems.

I have seen a ton of articles lately pushing the idea that once automated cars are reality that no one will need/want to own cars. I'm sorry, but taxis have been around since before the car was invented and they still only fill a minor role in our transportation needs. There are reasons for this, and automated cars don't address any of those issues.

The easiest way to figure the cost of living is to take your income and add ten percent.