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Comment: Re:A few bad apples (Score 1) 597

by adminstring (#31971394) Attached to: Seattle Hacker Catches Cops Who Hid Arrest Tapes
#1 and #3 are true, however #2 is false. The information existed and could have in fact been provided. The existence of a "policy" not to give existing relevant evidence to a defense attorney after a certain time period does not change that fact. According to the Brady v. Maryland decision, suppression of exculpatory evidence is a violation of due process. Also, knowingly denying the existence of such existing evidence would be perjury.

Comment: Re:Never build a house on another man's land... (Score 1) 265

by adminstring (#31313302) Attached to: 8-Year Fan-Made Game Project Shut Down By Activision
I agree with your interpretation. I was answering GP's general question about whether trademarks are ever lost by not defending them, and did not mean to imply that this was the case with Activision and King's Quest. Activision, as far as I can tell, are just being jerks in this case.

Comment: Re:Never build a house on another man's land... (Score 3, Insightful) 265

by adminstring (#31313098) Attached to: 8-Year Fan-Made Game Project Shut Down By Activision
We're talking about trademarks in this thread, not patents. There's a different set of laws for those.

Zipper was a trademark which wasn't enforced, and thus it became genericized. If it had been enforced, we'd have to call zippers "sliding fasteners" or something equally awkward. The physical design to which the trademark refers could or could not be patented, that's a completely different issue from whether or not the brand name that refers to the design is trademarked.

You could trademark a non-patented design, or patent a design and not trademark a name for it. Patents and trademarks are apples and oranges.

Comment: Re:I think its entirely reasonable to say... (Score 0) 439

by zMaile (#31313026) Attached to: Caltech Makes Flexible, 86% Efficient Solar Arrays
I'm not 100% sure, but if 78% of electrons generate electricity, isn't there still wasted energy before it actually gets to the useful energy stage? i.e. energy in a single visible photon (~700nm if i recall) is significantly higher than the energy required to jump an electron up a state, and that difference in energy is turned into heat. this would have the effect of reducing the overall efficiency to 15% or something that is much lower. Is this true, or am i remembering bits and peices that are all wrong?

Comment: Re:uhg silverlight works in linux (Score 1) 133

by Hadlock (#31312832) Attached to: Google Enhances Street View With User Photos

I don't claim to be a MS fanboy, I only run XP for games; my laptops/netbooks all run ubuntu. Had any other company in the world released this you wouldn't have commented the way you did. Did you see how the user videos were overlaid right overtop of the existing data?? In google it's just a black, blank canvas (try looking up under the eiffle tower in paris). Who cares if you need a live feed to do that? Their system is infinitely more extensible than google's currently is. As for releasing tech demos, this was done right through their current map beta, which anyone can use. It's not vaporware.

Comment: Re:Never build a house on another man's land... (Score 4, Informative) 265

by adminstring (#31312696) Attached to: 8-Year Fan-Made Game Project Shut Down By Activision
Trademarks which have lost their legal protection in the US due to a lack of zealous lawyering include "aspirin," originally a trademark of Bayer AG, "escalator," originally a trademark of Otis Elevator Company, "thermos," originally a trademark of Thermos GmbH, "yo-yo," originally a trademark of Duncan Yo-Yo Company, and "zipper," originally a trademark of B.F. Goodrich. References and more info are available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genericized_trademark For a legal precedent from the world of real property, check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adverse_possession

Comment: Multiple Attacks? (Score 1) 404

by Tablizer (#31312448) Attached to: New Wave of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

All the existing antibiotics attack various mechanisms of bacteria. Even though the cellular critters can evolve around these attacks, it generally requires more resources to do so: extra thick cell walls, extra toxin pumps, etc. While any one work-around won't be a major stumbling block for the critter, It seems to me that fairly low doses of many antibiotics would attack enough mechanisms of the critter to slow down its reproduction enough for the human body's defenses to have an edge on it.

It's just like WW2: you bomb their train tracks, bridges, ports, power plants, etc. such that the total result slows them down even though no one attack stops them. It seems the current crop of antibiotics try to be a single magic key, which is unrealistic in the long run.

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