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Comment: Internet Draft - not a Draft Standard (Score 2) 35

by admcd (#43415005) Attached to: Draft IETF Standard for SSH Key Management Released

This is an Internet Draft. Internet Drafts are the working documents of the IETF - some become standards most don't.

The IETF allows anyone to publish an Internet Draft. This is an 'individual draft' - produced by an individual, and not an IETF working group. So it's a bit disingenuous to say that the "IETF Opens Draft Version of Updated SSH for Public Review" as the linked article does. (And as noted, in other comments, this document is more about operational best practice than changes to protocol standards anyway.)

Unless this is picked up by an IETF working group then it can't be a standard - the independent RFC submission track only allows the resultant RFCs to classed as Informational or Experimental.

I'm not sure where "final version of the standard is expected in October" comes from. It isn't what "Expires: October 06, 2013" means on the draft. (All Internet Drafts expire after 6 months.)

Music

+ - "Open Source Bach" project completed; score and recording now online -> 1

Submitted by
rDouglass
rDouglass writes "MuseScore, the open source music notation editor, and pianist Kimiko Ishizaka have released a new recording and digital edition of Bach's Goldberg Variations. The works are released under the Creative Commons Zero license to promote the broadest possible free use of the works. The score underwent two rounds of public peer review, drawing on processes normally applied to open source software. Furthermore, the demands of Bach's notational style drove significant advancements in the MuseScore open source project. The recording was made on a Bösendorfer 290 Imperial piano in the Teldex Studio of Berlin. Anne-Marie Sylvestre, a Canadian record producer, was inspired by the project and volunteered her time to edit and produce the recording. The project was funded by a successful Kickstarter campaign that was featured on Slashdot in March 2011."
Link to Original Source
Internet Explorer

+ - Is The Internet Explorer IQ Test A Fake?->

Submitted by aesoteric
aesoteric (1344297) writes "Internet Explorer users may not be so stupid after all. Whois records and web content comparisons have raised questions over the company behind a survey that garnered global headlines this week for claiming that Internet Explorer users were dummies. It was unclear how the company, AptiQuant, stood to benefit from the publicity it had generated, and the person who answered their phone declined to volunteer his identity. In addition, a French psychometric testing company has denied any link to AptiQuant."
Link to Original Source
Music

+ - IMSLP.org forced offline by MPA DMCA takedown->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "From the article:

The MPA, without notifying us, sent to our domain registrar GoDaddy a bogus DMCA takedown notice. GoDaddy took the entire IMSLP.ORG domain down. IMSLP has filed a DMCA counter notice with GoDaddy, however, the DMCA seems to require the registrar to wait no less than 10 days before restoring service. This means that IMSLP is inaccessible from IMSLP.ORG during this period of time. We will be working to restore service as soon as possible.

What is the MPA complaining about? Rachmaninoff’s Bells, which is public domain both in Canada and the USA: [link]. MPA’s claim is entirely bogus."

Link to Original Source
Music

+ - imslp.org Taken Down Thanks to MPA->

Submitted by dsavi
dsavi (1540343) writes "The International Music Score Library Project's website imslp.org (A library of public domain scores and recordings of classical music) has been taken down by GoDaddy per a DMCA takedown request from the Music Publisher's Association. According to the MPA, a score of Rachmanioff's Bells is under copyright in the US, while according to IMSLP it is most definitely not. A DMCA counter-notice has been issued to GoDaddy by IMSLP, unfortunately there is a ten-day waiting period before the domain can be restored. While the imslp.org domain is down, the music library can still be accessed at PetrucciLibrary.org. Anyone who is interested in helping with counter-suing the MPA can email imslproject at yahoo dot ca."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Why wouldn't they charge for tethering? (Score 1) 326

by admcd (#28311627) Attached to: Will AT&T Charge Extra For MMS & Tethering?

"Because it is no different surfing the net with the iphone displaying the data or your laptop displaying the data."

I'm not sure I fully agree with that statement. Your behaviour is likely to differ between iPhone usage and what you do on your laptop. e.g. on your laptop you're more likely to exchange large documents via e-mail, download Windows updates, etc.

There will be some concept of what an "average" user does and their current tariffs will be priced accordingly. Changing the device being used is likely to change the assumptions.

Controversial suggestion: maybe what you want is a capped usage tariff that can be shared between iPhone and tethered devices, rather the current "all you can eat"....

Mozilla

+ - Firefox keeps winning terrain in Europe

Submitted by
PARENA
PARENA writes "French researcher Xiti claims that Mozilla Firefox keeps winning terrain in Europe. Almost 25% of internet users in Europe uses Firefox. Slovenia (44.5%), Finland (41.3%), Croatia (36.5%) and Germany (36.2%) lead the way, followed by a group of mostly Eastern European countries. Remarkably, The Netherlands is only at 13.3%, right before Andorra. The rest of the world (except Oceania) is behind Europe, with 11.9% to 15.1%."
Patents

+ - Vonage Admits no Workaround for Verizon Patents

Submitted by
Frosty Piss
Frosty Piss writes "USA Today is reporting that Vonage has finally confirmed what many suspected: The company has no "workaround" to sidestep Verizon's VOIP patents. Moreover, Vonage isn't sure that such a plan is even feasible, given the expansiveness of Verizon's patents, which set out methods for passing calls between the Internet and conventional phone networks. Vonage has seen its shares plunge more than 80% since it went public last year. This year alone, its shares are down more than 45%. Is this the end for Vonage? How will this effect other VOIP providers?"
Security

+ - Tor Open to Attack

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A group of researchers have written a paper that lays out an attacks against Tor, in enough detail to cause Roger Dingledine a fair amount of heartburn. The essential attacks are: Tor doesn't verify claims of uptime or bandwidth, allowing an attacker to advertise more than it need deliver, and thus draw traffic. If the attacker controls the entry and exit node and has decent clocks, then the attacker can link these together and trace someone through the network. Yowza!"

It is not for me to attempt to fathom the inscrutable workings of Providence. -- The Earl of Birkenhead

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