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Comment: Re:Monster Business School (Score 1) 288 288

Ugh... sorry bad formatting, the quote parent didn't come through?

What you really want is a connector plated the same as the connector you're connecting it to. If it's tin-plated, use a tin-plated connector. If it's gold-plated, use gold. What I don't know of is any tin-plated cables which include a sacrificial zinc anode. In motoring (and presumably other places with metal bolted to metal) we use zinc anti-seize where dissimilar metals meet because it gets eaten up first, which is handy. I'm not sure if that applies to tin, though. Also in motoring, tin is what's used as an intermediate between steel or copper and aluminum.

Tin is used for solder but in alloys which reduce whiskering, but you certainly don't want pure tin or zinc used for your connectors with tons of very close signal lines because both of them have issues with whiskering which can lead to shorts... especially at points where mechanical stress can occur (flexing of the connection).

Comment: Re:Monster Business School (Score 1) 288 288

What you really want is a connector plated the same as the connector you're connecting it to. If it's tin-plated, use a tin-plated connector. If it's gold-plated, use gold. What I don't know of is any tin-plated cables which include a sacrificial zinc anode. In motoring (and presumably other places with metal bolted to metal) we use zinc anti-seize where dissimilar metals meet because it gets eaten up first, which is handy. I'm not sure if that applies to tin, though. Also in motoring, tin is what's used as an intermediate between steel or copper and aluminum.

Tin is used for solder but in alloys which reduce whiskering, but you certainly don't want pure tin or zinc used for your connectors with tons of very close signal lines because both of them have issues with whiskering which can lead to shorts... especially at points where mechanical stress can occur (flexing of the connection).

Comment: Re:Well there's the problem... (Score 1) 201 201

"(taxi licenses in Italy are numbered, each can cost more than $ 100k to obtain)."

There's the problem. Piss off Italy...

Taxi licenses (cab medallions) in the US can cost over a million to obtain (example New York City just two years ago). http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11...

Comment: Re:Access time latency (Score 1) 162 162

Until the engine decides to redundantly load the same package again, it won't be cached (ie first time is off disk and latter times off RAM). A good engine limits the number of times redundant loads occur. And unless you have an abundance of RAM, it's typically pointless to cache a very large file that is read at a slower speed than what the disk will actively serve as well.

Comment: Re:Why not? (Score 1) 678 678

Ah, the Australian plant has 3X the output. I'm not sure if there is higher efficiency (operation cost) for larger plants, but typically, desalinization is a process which has some efficiency scaling. Anyhow, 7-8% of one very metropolitan/urban county isn't going to put a dent in overall CA water consumption when the vast majority of it is going to agricultural uses.

Comment: Re:Opinion from a game developer (Score 1) 162 162

Game engines are constantly improving on this too... with file read ahead, and multithreading decompression of chunks, as well as other optimizations. Over time, this process has been gradually getting faster and at some point, SSD's will come out ahead. It's just that the current bottleneck is quite often CPU and memory bandwidth, not HD linear read speed.

Comment: Opinion from a game developer (Score 1) 162 162

NOTE: I'm speaking for myself here, and not for my company, but I have been working full time in the games industry for 23 years.

Most games use pack-files (sometimes called packages) that are large binary blobs on disk that are loaded contiguously in a seek-free manner. Additionally, these blobs may have ZIP or other compression applied to them (often in an incremental chunked way). The CPU's can only process the serialization of assets (loading) at a certain speed due to things like allocation of memory from the kernel and graphics drivers (which on secure OS's typically involves remapping and clearing pages). There are additional CPU constraints for the decompression, and for the serialization "linker" phase to associate assets in a package and present them to the game engine.

All this stuff takes time, and in a game with streaming (loading while game-play is going on), there are a limited number of CPU cycles as well as memory bandwidth to process the serialization after running the game engine.

These processing constraints impose a limit on the speed at which data can be loaded and consumed by the engine. And in many game engines on a typically powered PC, that number may be anywhere from 50-200MB/s but probably averaging closer to 100-150MB/s. Since this is in the linear contiguous read speed of many hard drives, as long as the package file is not fragmented on the disk, using an SSD will result in minimal speedup during this type of loading process.

Comment: Re:Why not? (Score 1) 678 678

For $30B, you can build a LOT of desalination plants.

Define "a LOT"??? My calculations are that you could build maybe 4-5 plants or actually build and operate 2 plants going on costs from other similar plants in the world.

Australia built a desalination plant with an intial estimated construction cost of $3-4B AUS. Final construction was $6-7B AUS -- however, the total costs including operation of the plant at $1.8M a day over the 27yr contract will be around $19B Australian or roughly $15B US.

Assuming the US could operate as efficiently cost-wise (and we rarely do on large public works projects), we could afford to build and run 2 Desalination plants for $30B US.

Comment: Re:In other news (Score 1) 609 609

It specifically is illegal actually.

You forget this pesky "t" variable in the equation that represents TIME.

It is illegal *NOW*. It wasn't illegal when she was in office. The requirement to use government hosted email was passed after Clinton resigned and only became legally effective in November of 2014. Clinton left office in February of 2013.

http://mediamatters.org/resear...

Comment: Re:It's not a "moral dilemma" to a Clinton (Score 5, Informative) 609 609

Laws are for the little people, not them.

The Presidential and Federal Records Act Amendments of 2014 became law on November 26, 2014. Clinton's final day as secretary was February 1, 2013.

The "Law" that everyone keeps claiming that she broke wasn't effective until a year and a half after she left office.

There was absolutely no legal requirement at the time of her tenure to use a government e-mail. Furthermore, she retroactively complied with the records portion of the law by turning over any business related e-mails she had on her home server archive.

Also, previous Secretaries of State, like Colin Powell, used personal email as well. In his case, they didn't even archive it so many of the emails are lost. We'll never have access to his electronic discusssions about, say, the decisions leading for him to give a speech at the United Nations calling for the Invasion of Iraq.

Comment: Re:we ARE different (Score 1) 355 355

IQ doesn't "rise" for an entire population. If all the scores are rising, it means the test is out of date and needs to be restandardized.

By definition, IQ is measured as a standard distribution curve with an IQ of 100 being the average. If everyone on the planet suddenly got twice as smart, we'd still have the same IQ because again, IQ measures you in relation to the rest of the population.

If you develop a new IQ test, then you have to standardize the scoring on it so that average == 100 or you're not actually testing for IQ.

From Wiki: When current IQ tests are developed, the median raw score of the norming sample is defined as IQ 100 and scores each standard deviation (SD) up or down are defined as 15 IQ points greater or less

THEGODDESSOFTHENETHASTWISTINGFINGERSANDHERVOICEISLIKEAJAVELININTHENIGHTDUDE

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