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Comment: Re:Prior Art Exists. (Score 2) 264

No, No: somebody should do a little research on this Ingrisano character and let him know that we know where his kids go to school and the route his wife takes to work (if no wife or kids, mom and dad would do, too).

Then smile.

Scum like this deserve no better

From the pictures you can find I dunno if he's likely to have a wife or kids...

Comment: Re:Oblig frosty (Score 1) 225

by ackthpt (#47042319) Attached to: US To Charge Chinese Military Employees With Hacking

I'm more disposed to this particular view...

You put your secrets on computers which are exposed to the internet? STUPID!

I can't blame the Chinese or the Russians or some school kid in Vallejo, California, for prying in and having a look around, if companies are so damn stupid about erecting barriers between Trade Secrets hosting systems and an outside world. How about building an intranet, encrypting resources, creating VPNs which require a key, employing something like Kerberos to verify some user on a workstation should have access?

All down to laziness and paying the executives too much for their massive blind spots.

Comment: Re:lesson to be learnt (Score 1) 303

There is a lesson to be learnt here: Never depend on programming language, which is not under appropriate free license.

Apache Foundation, do you hear me?

Once the ballyhoo and excitement at the birth of a new language have subsided it is quickly supplanted by the motherly urge to control and protect.

Comment: Numbers do not reflect quality (Score 3, Interesting) 102

by ackthpt (#46959993) Attached to: Netcraft: Microsoft Closing In On Apache Web Server Lead

I once lived in the heart of the US auto industry. Anonymous tin-box Chevy and Ford cars ruled the roads by shear numbers. Not many people remember these high volume cars, the Vega, Maverick, Nova, Fairlane, Granada, Chevette. And the Pinto is only well remembered due to an engineering oversight which made it a mobile crematorium.

So Microsoft has higher numbers, yeah? So who is using these things? Quick and dirty websites or real e-commerce, media, commercial/industrial?

Numbers alone aren't very meaningful.

We demand, lies, damned lies and statistics

Comment: Re:alt: guys who built iphone know how it works. (Score 1, Flamebait) 202

by ackthpt (#46950555) Attached to: Apple Can Extract Texts, Photos, Contacts From Locked iPhones

MS on the other hand, really don't know how to build a filemanager for their phone, so they gave up.

I'm honestly surprised when someone on MSDN knows the precise reason something works or does not, their own code probably looks like muck to them, too. Keep going through these exercises of "try this..."

OT - I'm not surprised. Is anyone surprise? Apple is the private sector equivalent to the NSA.

Comment: Re:Get off my effin lawn! (Score 1) 457

by ackthpt (#46935109) Attached to: Favorite Star Wars Movie?

When I saw Star Wars in the theatre when it was released, it was call Star Wars. None of this "New hope" BS. And it was the one where Han shot first!

And lets also not forget Kurosawa's "Hidden Fortress" (which I never saw in theaters but I *have* seen)

So get off my lawn you young whippersnappers.

When I watched Star Wars, the first film, I was perched in a seat with a massive bucket of popcorn in my lap (as I wasn't very tall, yet, it nearly obscured the screen, such was my love of popcorn.) When that Imperial Star Destroyer cruised "overhead" the piece of popcorn on my tongue rolled out and fell back into the bucket. I was floored by the visual effect. I think I scarcely touched the popcorn throughout the rest of the film and was surprised to find I had a bucket of popcorn at the end. Gripping.

It hasn't aged well, though. Characters, Luke and Han among them, have a decided 70s look about them (the Dry Look) other things, like computer displays look pathetic next to what my mobile phone can do. A keener eye shows how slapped together some things look upon later viewings, as well. Lucas' addition of CGI in later DVD releases are a poor fit for some of the gritty shot locations, such as the dock on Tatooine.

Viewed through the lens of my memory, I still love it and recall the thrill of watching it the first time and standing in my home drive, staring upward, trying to visualize how an Imperial Star Destroyer would look in the sky above our house.

You don't have to know how the computer works, just how to work the computer.

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