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Comment: Re:Swords (Score 1) 174

by acidreverb (#38999355) Attached to: Jedi Master's Hand-Made Lightsaber Stolen

So I don't think that this guy is some deluded sap who thinks that lightsaber fighting is a real skill or anything.

I'm not so sure. He does admit it's stage fighting. However, he refers to himself as a "Grand Master" (of fake sword fighting...) and is quoted in the article as stating “We’re teaching people how to be heroes, and I need it back.” Seems pretty deluded to me...

Comment: Re:Dunning-Kruger effect (Score 1) 1003

by acidreverb (#38396506) Attached to: Why the NTSB Is Wrong About Cellphones

...Wow... No.

Your perception of your performance while impaired, and the reality of it, are two different things. Driving tests are not really hard, so being able to pass one in an inebriated state does not mean anything at all. That's like saying if you get home once, drunk off your ass, it's OK to do it again; clearly you have the skills right?

If you drive impaired, eventually you will kill someone. It probably wont be yourself though, it will be the sober guy in the other lane. Sure, people get away with it, sometimes for years; that doesn't make them safe to do so, just lucky.

Join a rescue squad, or fire dept. Run some calls. Learn a few things first hand.

Comment: Re:Somebody tell the schools (Score 2) 184

by acidreverb (#37490598) Attached to: One Third of UK Kids Under 10 Own a Mobile Phone

Even my schools back in the 60s and 70s had landlines that could be used by the students. My daughter's schools (she graduated just a couple yrs ago), had phones in the office that could be used.

In the 90's, at my high-school, the office was closed after school hours. If one didn't have money for a payphone, there were no phones a student could use. My only option, on more than one occasion, was to call collect. With payphones quickly disappearing, I'm not even sure if that's an option anymore.

I appreciate you're pragmatism. But your personal situation is not universal.

Comment: Re:Bush led in pre-election polls in Ohio (Score 1) 504

by acidreverb (#36900526) Attached to: Court Filing On How 2004 Ohio Election Hacked

You can't know. You can't Recount. You don't know the source. YOU CAN NOT [VERIFY].

You can recount paper all you want. But if the paper has been manipulated you're not really verifying anything at all.

E-voting has been implemented all-wrong. I'm not going to argue that. But if is was done correctly, with audits of the system and audits of the tallies, it would be every bit as, if not more secure than, paper.

Comment: Re:Bush led in pre-election polls in Ohio (Score 1) 504

by acidreverb (#36900450) Attached to: Court Filing On How 2004 Ohio Election Hacked

It's simply not as easy to fudge physical ballots as [electronic] ones.

Why's that?

We trust people not to replace a truckload of votes before they get to the tallying location. But that doesn't mean they couldn't do it. Or, more nefariously, one could manipulate the tally by legislating which votes are acceptable. Consider the hanging chads fiasco; or, changing the rules of when absentee votes are, and are not, acceptable.

A paper ballot can not be traced back to you as a person. So how is it more secure? What's to stop counterfeit ballots?

Comment: Too simple (Score 1) 172

by acidreverb (#36900188) Attached to: The Uncanny Valley Explained

You're comparing apples to oranges.

Desk lamps are not trying to be human, even though Pixar has a way of personifying animals and normally inanimate things. People already have a natural inclination to attribute human emotions and qualities to non-human things and animals. We get attached to objects and we believe that our pet fish have personalities, a complete fantasy. However, that has nothing to do with the uncanny valley phenomenon. Your counterpoint, Final Fantasy, worked very hard to give very human qualities to very human looking CGI. The effect was not complete and many people were turned off by it. That is the uncanny valley.

Makeup and bras alter a persons appearance in a manner that is pleasing; most of the time. Makeup can enhance one's color to be warmer, or create a more even skin tone. However, the wrong makeup, too much makeup, improperly applied makeup, can trigger repulsion. Many people find clowns frightening or repulsive. Also, to your point, mimes make some people uneasy. People differ wildly on how much makeup is attractive. A bra can enhance one's shape. The wrong bra, not so much.

I think the bottom line is our brains don't like to be tricked unless we see it coming; and, like almost any human attribute, some people are more sensitive than others. Most people can accept an animation that has human traits but doesn't look all that human (Simpsons, Flintstones, etc.). They are so far from looking human that it doesn't trigger our alarms. Most people can accept a human that acts like a robot, or even a zombie. We see these things for what they are. Humans with decoration, not things trying to look like humans. Most people can not accept something that looks and acts a lot like a human, but not quite. It gets past some of our filters, but sets off alarms in others. We get conflicted subconsciously. We don't like it...

Science

+ - BP and Transocean must use relief wells?->

Submitted by G3ckoG33k
G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Like many others I had heard about the Ixtoc Mexican Gulf oil spill from 31 years ago. The company drilling in 1979 was Sedco, later known as Transocean, which is the operator contracted by BP for the Deepwater Horizon. Now, an 8 minute YouTube clip with original 1979 footage summarizes "All of the techniques now being used to plug the oil spill in the Deepwater Horizon disaster were tried 31 years ago with Ixtoc I and they failed. It was only when relief wells were drilled 9 months after the disaster began that the Ixtoc spill could be capped." So, it is BP and Transocean. So, when will they get those relief wells in place?! Who is betting on 2011?"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:More like a flaw in statistics (Score 1) 437

by acidreverb (#31563852) Attached to: Flaw In Emergency Response System May Have Killed Hundreds
The category provided by the dispatch system determines a target response time. The call taker puts pertinent information into the computer aided dispatch (CAD) system. The CAD will determine priority level, and recommended units. At that point the call is dispatched to the appropriate response crews. An intelligent dispatcher, with the authority to do so, could take a CAD recommendation and alter it before dispatching. For instance, in the situation from the article, the dispatcher would know that a patient who was unconscious with abnormal breathing after a fall is clearly a top priority patient. They would relay that to the responding unit with a high run priority. The ambulance would then run lights and sirens to the scene instead of taking their time as they would for a twisted ankle.

Comment: Re:World improves (Score 1) 921

by acidreverb (#28881781) Attached to: UK's FSA Finds No Health Benefits To Organic Food

I hate to break it to you, but for the last 3 or so months that you were in the womb, you were floating in your own excrement.

You do not float around in your own excrement for 3 months.

Your first deuce comes after birth in most cases. It's called meconium.

If meconium is excreted in utero it can be dangerous as the baby may aspirate the meconium which can lead to serious complications. This is a big reason we suction the airways of babies immediately, before their first breath.

Not only is UNIX dead, it's starting to smell really bad. -- Rob Pike

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