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Swedish Anti-Piracy Lawyer Gets New Name 'Pirate' Screenshot-sm 178

An anonymous reader writes "Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet (in Swedish) reports that Henrik Pontén, a lawyer of Antipiratbyrån, a Swedish organization against file sharing, has received a notification from officials that an application for change of his name has been approved and a new first name 'Pirate' has been added to his name. Authorities do not check the identity of persons applying for name changes. Pirate Pontén now has to apply for another change in order to revert the change."

Don't Panic, It's Towel Day! 164

An anonymous reader writes "Today, as every May 25th, geeks all over the world celebrate Towel Day and carry a towel in honor of Douglas Adams. The popular author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy died in 2001 at the age of 49, but his work lives on. According to the book, a towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have. Hence its symbolic role in this celebration. This year, for the first time as far as we know, Towel Day is being supported by the British publisher of Adams' books, who organizes a photo competition."

Submission + - Bittorrent interface to .gov data in bulk (resource.org)

Carl Malamud writes: "Through the judicious use of wget, we've accumulated an archive of 5.1 million PDF pages representing the major databases of the U.S. government. These include the Federal Register, the Congressional Record, Presidential Papers, and Public Laws. This data was previously only available for high retail fees or through a decade-old WAIS [sic] interface for the public. We're making the data available as tarballs with http and bittorrent interfaces up now, rsync and ftp coming rsn.

The cool thing about this is that for years, people have been telling the Government Printing Office that they should provide their data in bulk for free. The answer has always been "good suggestion, please send us a memo." But, it turns out if instead of telling the GPO they should do the work you simply inform them that you're going to harvest their database using their existing interface, they say "go for it" and assign a technical team to talk to in case you have any questions. Never hurts to ask!"

If we could sell our experiences for what they cost us, we would all be millionaires. -- Abigail Van Buren