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Submission + - Apple Wins Injunction Banning Import of Some HTC P (allthingsd.com)

squish18 writes: All Things D reports that Apple as won an injunction banning the import of some HTC phones, starting in April, 2012. The ruling by the ITC stems from two claims of *647 patent concerning software used to enter personal data in mobile devices. It is interesting to note that the ITC has also reversed previous rulings regarding regarding infringement of two other *647 claims, as well as patent *263 claims.
Your Rights Online

Submission + - RIAA and DHS Outed as Illegal Downloaders (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "The RIAA really, really doesn't want you downloading music illegally, which is why it comes as an irony-laden surprise that some individuals at the RIAA (as well as the Department of Homeland Security, Sony, Universal, Fox, and the French Presidential Palace) were found to have downloaded files from BitTorrent. Writers at TorrentFreak used the database YouHaveDownloaded to identify IP addresses of the illegal downloaders."

Submission + - Law Professors on SOPA and the PROTECT IP Act: Don (stanfordlawreview.org)

An anonymous reader writes: The Stanford Law Review Online has just published a piece by Mark Lemley, David S. Levine, and David G. Post on the PROTECT IP Act and the Stop Online Piracy Act. In Don’t Break the Internet, they argue that the two bills — intended to counter online copyright and trademark infringement — “share an underlying approach and an enforcement philosophy that pose grave constitutional problems and that could have potentially disastrous consequences for the stability and security of the Internet’s addressing system, for the principle of interconnectivity that has helped drive the Internet’s extraordinary growth, and for free expression.”

They write:

"These bills, and the enforcement philosophy that underlies them, represent a dramatic retreat from this country’s tradition of leadership in supporting the free exchange of information and ideas on the Internet. At a time when many foreign governments have dramatically stepped up their efforts to censor Internet communications, these bills would incorporate into U.S. law a principle more closely associated with those repressive regimes: a right to insist on the removal of content from the global Internet, regardless of where it may have originated or be located, in service of the exigencies of domestic law."


Submission + - MIT Software Allows Queries On Encrypted Databases (forbes.com)

Sparrowvsrevolution writes: CryptDB, a piece of database software that MIT researchers presented at the Symposium on Operating System Principles in October, allows users to send queries to an encrypted SQL database and get results without decrypting the stored information. CryptDB works by nesting data in several layers of cryptography, each of which has a different key and allows a different kind of simple operation on encrypted data. It doesn't work with every kind of calculation, and it's not the first system to offer this sort of computation on encrypted data. But it may be the only practical one. Previous crypto schemes that allowed operations on encrypted data multiplied computing time by a factor of a trillion. This one adds only 15-26%.

Submission + - Verizon Wireless Hit With Net Neutrality Lawsuit (itworld.com)

jfruhlinger writes: "When Verizon announced that it would be launching Samsung Galaxy Nexus without Google Wallet, many were disappointed, but one Stanford law professor decided to actually do something about it. Barbara van Schewick, director of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, thinks that by blocking Google's wireless payment service, Verizon is violating net neutrality rules it agreed to when it bought wireless spectrum at auction in 2008, and she's filed a lawsuit with the FCC to force Verizon to open the phone."

Submission + - How SOPA could actually break the internet (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "Depending on how its implemented, SOPA could demolish the cohesive structure of the internet by damaging the core functionality of the DNS system. As written, SOPA tasks ISPs with preventing US internet users from accessing a site that’s been deemed to contain infringing content by preventing their browsers 'from resolving to that domain name’s Internet Protocol address.' The question is, how might that sort of blocking actually be accomplished? The only real solution is to create a DNS blacklist at the ISP level that prevents US citizens from seeing infringing content — but then what's to stop users from simply using an offshore DNS? The US will then pressure those offshore services to fall into line — but alternatively, we could be looking at a complete schism, where the US internet breaks away from Europe and Asia. Perhaps we might soon be living in a world where both an ARPANET and a RIPENET coexist..."

Submission + - Samsung files new claims against Apple in Germany (mindprocessors.com)

An anonymous reader writes: South Korea’s Samsung Electronics said on Monday that it has filed new legal claims against US rival Apple in

Germany, claiming that the iPhone maker infringed four of its patents.


Submission + - 90% Species On Earth Not Yet Discovered [STUDY] (gizmocrazed.com)

Mightee writes: "A study by science experts shows that only 10 percent of the species that live on this planet have been discovered and 90 percent of the species have yet to be discovered.

The study which was published in the open journal by the name of PLoS Biology, increases the possible amount of species that share this planet with us. The journal says that only 1.2 million species have been discovered and named so far, and more than 9 million species have yet to be discovered."


Submission + - Intel 32nm Atom performance previewed

An anonymous reader writes: Intel’s upcoming 32nm Cedar Trail Atom platform has been an object of curiosity for well over a year, and the recent success and strong performance of AMD’s Brazos platform have ratcheted interest up another few notches. Intel responded to Brazos by issuing an accelerated Atom roadmap in May, but 32nm performance figures have been kept largely under wraps.
The Almighty Buck

Submission + - Gears Of War 3 "Season Pass" Idea Is Ludicrous (gamergaia.com)

Calidreth writes: The whole DLC (downloadable content) add-on concept is continuing to be more and more of a trend these days, especially amongst titles on the Xbox 360. Instead of putting all their content on the completed retail version, developers are starting to hold back some of that content in the hopes of making some extra money.

"No, no, I don't mind being called the smartest man in the world. I just wish it wasn't this one." -- Adrian Veidt/Ozymandias, WATCHMEN