Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Android

+ - Facebook For Android Passes Facebook For iPhone

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Facebook for Android is now more popular than Facebook for iPhone, in terms of daily active users. Put another way, the most popular app on Android is now more popular than the most popular app on iPhone. Will Facebook now treat the two platforms equally, or even favor Google’s Android over Apple’s iOS?"
Apple

+ - Apple Wins Injunction Banning Import of Some HTC P->

Submitted by squish18
squish18 (758259) writes "All Things D reports that Apple as won an injunction banning the import of some HTC phones, starting in April, 2012. The ruling by the ITC stems from two claims of *647 patent concerning software used to enter personal data in mobile devices. It is interesting to note that the ITC has also reversed previous rulings regarding regarding infringement of two other *647 claims, as well as patent *263 claims."
Link to Original Source
Your Rights Online

+ - RIAA and DHS Outed as Illegal Downloaders->

Submitted by
itwbennett
itwbennett writes "The RIAA really, really doesn't want you downloading music illegally, which is why it comes as an irony-laden surprise that some individuals at the RIAA (as well as the Department of Homeland Security, Sony, Universal, Fox, and the French Presidential Palace) were found to have downloaded files from BitTorrent. Writers at TorrentFreak used the database YouHaveDownloaded to identify IP addresses of the illegal downloaders."
Link to Original Source

+ - Novell vs. Microsoft: Juror did the right thing...->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Corbyn Alvey, who has a two-year degree in criminal justice, and was the part of the 12 juror on the case of Novell vs. Microsoft did the right thing. He holdout his vote and hung the jury. Microsoft got safe for the moment, and the Lawyers still have work to do. We, the lawyers, want to thank Alvey to help us get more money on this case... I think I will get a new BMW before the year ends."
Link to Original Source
Crime

+ - FBI Warns Hacktivists: You're Breaking the Law->

Submitted by bdcny7927
bdcny7927 (1315495) writes "In an exclusive interview with CIO.com, the FBI official in charge of cybercrime speaks for the first time with the media specifically about hacktivism. Here, Assistant Executive Director Shawn Henry describes the threats hacktivists pose, the challenges associated with investigating them, and the FBI's success disrupting these groups. He also delivers a special message to hacktivists."
Link to Original Source
Idle

+ - Kim Jong-Il Was An "Internet Expert" ->

Submitted by
pigrabbitbear
pigrabbitbear writes "The late Kim Jong Il bestowed upon himself many extravagant titles during his bizarre, iron-clad rule over North Korea. But here’s one that’s particularly interesting in light of the recent SOPA debate – “Internet expert.”

The DPRK’s Dear Leader fancied himself as such during an international summit in 2007. Seven years prior, he had asked U.S. Secretary of State Madeline Albright for her email address, indicating that the North Korean internet black hole was perhaps not as thoroughly opaque as we made it out to be — at least not for those at the top.

For the rest of the world, surfing those scant blips of North Korean internet activity is still a very mysterious and weird experience: Of the 30 or so known North Korean websites, only one of them, belonging to its state-run news agency and run by a company called Star Joint Ventures, originates from inside North Korea itself. Bereft of the usual DNS handling, it can be accessed directly at 175.45.176.14, and seems to contain very little actual information beyond — you guessed it — a log of Kim Jong Il’s recent activities, which include attending giant performances in his honor and rejecting human rights bills."

Link to Original Source
Censorship

+ - Ireland to Fix Downloading Law for EMI->

Submitted by 2phar
2phar (137027) writes "The Irish Government is to publish an order early in the new year to allow music publishers, film producers and other parties to go to court to prevent ISPs from allowing their customers access to 'pirate' websites.

The government has written to music publisher EMI Ireland confirming the order will be published and incorporated into existing legislation in January. EMI Ireland recently warned the Government that it would take legal action against the State if the Government did not address the problem, following its unsuccessful attempt to seek an injunction against UPC last October"

Link to Original Source
Piracy

+ - Law Professors on SOPA and the PROTECT IP Act: Don->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The Stanford Law Review Online has just published a piece by Mark Lemley, David S. Levine, and David G. Post on the PROTECT IP Act and the Stop Online Piracy Act. In Don’t Break the Internet, they argue that the two bills — intended to counter online copyright and trademark infringement — “share an underlying approach and an enforcement philosophy that pose grave constitutional problems and that could have potentially disastrous consequences for the stability and security of the Internet’s addressing system, for the principle of interconnectivity that has helped drive the Internet’s extraordinary growth, and for free expression.”

They write:

"These bills, and the enforcement philosophy that underlies them, represent a dramatic retreat from this country’s tradition of leadership in supporting the free exchange of information and ideas on the Internet. At a time when many foreign governments have dramatically stepped up their efforts to censor Internet communications, these bills would incorporate into U.S. law a principle more closely associated with those repressive regimes: a right to insist on the removal of content from the global Internet, regardless of where it may have originated or be located, in service of the exigencies of domestic law.""

Link to Original Source
Cloud

+ - MIT Software Allows Queries On Encrypted Databases->

Submitted by Sparrowvsrevolution
Sparrowvsrevolution (1926150) writes "CryptDB, a piece of database software that MIT researchers presented at the Symposium on Operating System Principles in October, allows users to send queries to an encrypted SQL database and get results without decrypting the stored information. CryptDB works by nesting data in several layers of cryptography, each of which has a different key and allows a different kind of simple operation on encrypted data. It doesn't work with every kind of calculation, and it's not the first system to offer this sort of computation on encrypted data. But it may be the only practical one. Previous crypto schemes that allowed operations on encrypted data multiplied computing time by a factor of a trillion. This one adds only 15-26%."
Link to Original Source
Android

+ - Verizon Wireless Hit With Net Neutrality Lawsuit->

Submitted by
jfruhlinger
jfruhlinger writes "When Verizon announced that it would be launching Samsung Galaxy Nexus without Google Wallet, many were disappointed, but one Stanford law professor decided to actually do something about it. Barbara van Schewick, director of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, thinks that by blocking Google's wireless payment service, Verizon is violating net neutrality rules it agreed to when it bought wireless spectrum at auction in 2008, and she's filed a lawsuit with the FCC to force Verizon to open the phone."
Link to Original Source
Network

+ - How SOPA could actually break the internet->

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "Depending on how its implemented, SOPA could demolish the cohesive structure of the internet by damaging the core functionality of the DNS system. As written, SOPA tasks ISPs with preventing US internet users from accessing a site that’s been deemed to contain infringing content by preventing their browsers 'from resolving to that domain name’s Internet Protocol address.' The question is, how might that sort of blocking actually be accomplished? The only real solution is to create a DNS blacklist at the ISP level that prevents US citizens from seeing infringing content — but then what's to stop users from simply using an offshore DNS? The US will then pressure those offshore services to fall into line — but alternatively, we could be looking at a complete schism, where the US internet breaks away from Europe and Asia. Perhaps we might soon be living in a world where both an ARPANET and a RIPENET coexist..."
Link to Original Source

Center meeting at 4pm in 2C-543.

Working...