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Submission + - Apollo 18 Begs The Question (What If) 1

tetrahedrassface writes: The cinematic release today of Apollo 18 begs the question of what would have become our collective space faring history had the program not been tragically canceled. It is in fact a historical truth that Apollo 18 did fly, as a joint flight between Russia and the United States. Apollo 18 did in fact fly, but not to the moon. However had the Apollo missions continued, where would be now. It is likely that we would have landed on Mars, have a permanent presence on Luna, have mutiple space observatories that were larger, and more powerful. Conceivably the Saturn V rockets could have lofted platforms for fuel depots, and components for a larger space station further out into orbit. The loss of the Saturn V's represents a loss od America's frontier spirit, and from the great technological victory we achieved we now sit moribound in low Earth orbit. Though the movie may be fiction, it still begs the question, what if?

Submission + - One other HUGE problem with global warming issue ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: The idea of man-caused global warming is unraveling before our very eyes, and the mainstream media still fails to ask tough questions about any red flags seen in it. The entire issue is a case study for journalistic malfeasance.

Consider this: skeptic climate scientists are accused of being in a conspiracy to "reposition global warming as theory rather than fact", which supposedly mimics the old tobacco industry conspiracy to downplay the health hazards of smoking. In my June 15th RedState article Forget the Science; Is Al Gore's Accusation of Skeptic Climate Scientists a Hoax?, I showed how that "reposition global warming" accusation phrase — spelled out full screen in Al Gore's movie — is 1) based on a 1991 coal industry memo no one was allowed to see, 2) it is an out-of-context sentence, promoted by a person who was not a Pulitzer winner despite accolades to the contrary, 3) Al Gore credited that person with finding the memo, and, 4) Gore had the memo collection in his own possession at his Senate office years before that person.

On June 22, Gore mysteriously contradicted himself again in his big Rolling Stone magazine article about who found the memo, and it also turns out his article's criticism of the media is nothing more than the same 15-year old ruse which was first promoted by the "Pulitzer winner" I mention above. Please see: Pt II: Is Gore's Accusation of Skeptic Climate Scientists Still a Hoax?.

Al Gore and all of his followers refuse to debate skeptic scientists. If they can't prove such skeptics are corrupt now, they have no other way to keep the so-called global warming crisis alive except to prove those skeptics are wrong. Does anybody now wonder why so much effort has been put into silencing criticism of the issue for twenty years?

Ignore the 'anonymous' label above. I am Russell Cook, and I approve this message. The above links and my other online articles & blogs about the smear of skeptic scientists are found at the 'Original Source' link just below.


Submission + - Apple has more cash than God^H^H^H the U.S. (

Ares writes: Its official. Apple is wealthier than the United States Government. CNN suggests that the US should start selling iPads. And why not? If it works for Apple, giving it a $76.2 billion cash balance sheet, surely, it could improve the US Treasury's $73.8 billion balance sheet. From the article: "This symbolic feat — the world's most highly valued tech company surpassing the fiscal strength of the world's most powerful nation — is just the latest pinnacle for Apple, which has been on an unprecedented roll."

Followed by: "'We don't let the cash burn a hole in the pocket or make stupid acquisitions,' CEO Jobs said last fall. 'We'd like to continue to keep our powder dry because we think there are one or more strategic opportunities in the future.'"

"Offering Uncle Sam a short-term loan is probably not one of them."


Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Using Code with an Expired Patent 1

kruhft writes: "I was recently doing some research into Genetic Programming and found through a blog post that looks to be useful. After looking over the code and license, I found that this was the first piece of code I had seen that was protected by a patent, issued on June 19, 1990. I read that patents last for 20 years, meaning that the patent that this code refers to is expired. Is there any way for me to be sure that using this code is safe from any patent troll attacks if I choose to use it? Would rewriting the code keep me from violating any other patents that the author might have regarding the use of such an algorithm? Does the code pass into the public domain after the patent expires?"

Submission + - US to become the Saudi Arabia of natural gas? (

An anonymous reader writes: For those opposed to natural gas drilling in the United States, fracking is a dirty word. But the public needs to have a serious discussion about whether the costs and risks (like methane contamination) outweigh the considerable benefit of reducing America’s dependence on foreign oil and turning the US into an energy exporter. In “The End of Country” Seamus McGraw aims to jump start the debate by examining the issues at ground level, describing what happens when Big Energy comes to small town USA.

Submission + - Best Buy Wants To Sue You For Being a Geek (

itwbennett writes: "Well, maybe not you... yet. But it certainly is eager to sue any company that uses the word geek. 'It was probably legitimate to go after Newegg, which ran a commercial showing a clueless salesteen at a big-box electronics store trying to explain the difference between two laptops, before flashing the slogan 'Take it from a Geek' to show you can learn more reading about a product on Newegg (or anywhere) than from asking even pertinent questions at Best Buy,' says blogger Kevin Fogarty. But the company even 'went after a Wisconsin priest who decided to market either his services or God's (it wasn't real clear who would be handling the service-fulfillment end of the SLA) by painting "God Squad" on his VW Beetle."

Submission + - LulzSec and Anonymous Team Up For AntiSec Op (

Orome1 writes: Over the weekend, LulzSec has seemingly finally moved away from being in it "for the lulz" and has acquired a cause: it has announced it has teamed up with Anonymous and other "affiliated battleships" and that it is launching "Operation Anti-Security". Their top priority is to steal and leak any classified government information, including email spools and documentation.

Submission + - Turning memories on/off with the flip of a switch (

cylonlover writes: Using electrical probes embedded into the brains of rats, scientists have managed to replicate the brain function associated with long-term behavior and found a way to literally turn memories on and off with the flip of a switch. The scientists hope their research will eventually lead to a neural prosthesis to help people suffering Alzheimer's disease, the effects of stroke or other brain injury to recover long-term memory capability.

Submission + - Tesla Sues BBC's Top Gear For Libel ( 3

thecarchik writes: About two years ago BBC's Top Gear aired a test drive of the then relatively new Tesla Roadster. In the particular episode, Tesla Roadsters are depicted as suffering several critical “breakdowns” during track driving. Host Jeremy Clarkson concludes the episode by saying that in the real world the Roadster "doesn’t seem to work"

Tesla claims that the breakdowns were staged, making most of Top Gear'(TM)s remarks about the Roadster untrue. Tesla also states that it can prove Top Gear’s tests were falsified due to the recordings of its cars’ onboard data-loggers.

What's Tesla asking for in the lawsuit? Tesla simply wants Top Gear to stop rebroadcasting the particular episode and to correct the record.


Submission + - Windows users at risk of video file attacks (

jbrodkin writes: "Microsoft warned users that a newly discovered Windows Media flaw could let hackers take over their PCs by tricking users into opening specially crafted video files. The video file vulnerability was rated critical in Microsoft's latest Patch Tuesday security announcement, and is "somewhat trivial for attackers to exploit," according to Symantec. The flaw "allows attackers to skip a few of the traditional steps needed to get malicious code to execute on a targeted computer." Microsoft has had to change the way library files and Windows media files are opened in order to prevent future attacks."

Submission + - Anon demands US give clothes back to Manning (

hajus writes: Anonymous has given the US one week to restore certain rights for Bradley Manning in his time in prison awaiting his trial including clothes, any religious texts, a ball, blankets, and bedsheets or they will begin to 'dox' Department of Defense Press Secretary Geoff Morell and chief warrant officer Denise Barnes. 'Dox'. "Dox" will involve digging up personal information on the two officials and mass harassment or public embarrassment. “Targets established,” reads the document, before naming Morell and Barnes. “We’re in the ruining business. And business is good.” The operation has been termed "Operation Bradical" by Anonymous.

Submission + - Does Facebook Kill Authenticity? 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Steve Cheney writes that the problem with tying internet-wide identity to a broadcast network like Facebook is that people don’t want one normalized identity, either in real life, or virtually. "People yearn to be individuals. They want to be authentic. They have numerous different groups of real-life friends. They stylize conversations. They are emotional and have an innate need to connect on different levels with different people," writes Cheney adding that the recent decision by a number of sites, including TechCrunch, to adopt Facebook commenting highlights the problem where the integration of the formatting and fonts is so strong that when you're reading comments you actuallyfeel like you are on Facebook, not a tech focused vertical site. "Facebook’s insistence that you have one identity across the web is both short-sighted and asinine, and people I talk to are starting to realize this," concludes Cheney. "Fact is, one social network will not rule the web... People are simply way too social to allow that.""

Submission + - Corporate data breach average cost hits $7.2M (

alphadogg writes: The cost of a data breach rose to $7.2 million last year from $6.8 million in 2009, with the average cost per compromised record in 2010 reaching $214, up 5% from 2009. The Ponemon Institute's annual study of data loss costs this year looked at 51 organizations who agreed to discuss the impact of losing anywhere between 4,000 to 105,000 customer records.While "negligence" remains the main cause of a data breach (in 41% of cases), for the first time the explanation of "malicious or criminal attacks" (in 31% of cases) came in ahead of the third leading cause, "system failure."

Submission + - Malvertising Attacks Surge (

Orome1 writes: Malvertising is on a significant rise, having doubled from Q3 to Q4 2010, according to Dasient. Based on Q4 estimates, three million malvertising impressions were served per day, an increase of 100% as compared to 1.5 million malvertising impressions per day in Q3 2010. More than one million web sites were estimated to be infected in Q4 2010. As compared to data from one year prior (Q4 2009), web malware infections have nearly doubled and are a growing threat that needs to be abated.

Submission + - Cloud Gaming With Ray Tracing (

An anonymous reader writes: As real-time ray tracing on a single desktop machine is still too slow for gaming Intel has worked on a research project that puts the heavy workload up into the cloud consisting of multiple 32-core chips working together. That enables new special effects for games like realistic reflections (e.g. on cars or the scope of a sniper rifle), glass simulations and multi-screen surveillance station. The paper also takes a closer look at various sources of latencies that become relevant in a cloud-based gaming approach.

"Help Mr. Wizard!" -- Tennessee Tuxedo