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Comment: Re:Not Exactly.... (Score 1) 453 453

I get how it works. I disagree completely that any access to a third party WiFi network should be up to any permissions model put out by Microsoft, or that I should have to basically implement the kludge so that the network is excluded.

It's a shitty idea, pure and simple.

Comment: Re:It's the end of the world as we know it! (Score 1) 262 262

Furthermore, even if they would manage to return the blocks to the pool in a couple of years, it would both be too late and too little and the demand for address space far outpaces the supply that ipv4 can offer.

This. We got 7 billion people - probably closer to 10 before it peaks, and as a minimum I should have one IP address at home, at work and for my cell phone. So 3*10 billion is 30 billion, IPv4 can offer 4 billion. And that's not counting every other odd thing I might want, like remote-controlled alarm/heating/whatever at my cabin or my car, servers of various kind and maybe IoT will become good for something.

Of course they probably could have just done it much, much simpler by making a dotted quad a dotted quint:

1.2.3.4.5

For compatibility each host under 1.2.3.4.x is granted 256 ports IPv4 ports mapped from x*256 to (x+1)*256-1 to a designated "IPv4 compatibility ports" like say the last ports from 65279 to 65535. So 1.2.3.4.1 can either be fully addressed by quint-capable equipment or 1.2.3.4:256-511 that'll be mapped to 1.2.3.4.1:65279-65535. And 1.2.3.4.2 will have 1.2.3.4:512-767 mapped to 1.2.3.4.2:65279-65535 and so on. You could use the same technique to provide a virtual IPv4 interface for legacy software, it thinks it is listening to 1.2.3.4:256 but it's really listening at 1.2.3.4.1:65279 - and any application it tells to connect to 1.2.3.4:256 would work.

That would have led to a gradual 256-times expansion of the address space without any hard switch-offs. But instead they decided to solve everything and now 19 years after the IPv6 standard we're still only barely in motion.

Comment: Re:Modularity (Score 4, Informative) 74 74

The very page you link to says:

Some might argue that there might arise a small problem with shipping 27M ICU libraries. If you don't need ICU (http://site.icu-project.org/) you have to recompile Qt with ./configure -without-icu.

What's ICU?

Here are a few highlights of the services provided by ICU:

Code Page Conversion: Convert text data to or from Unicode and nearly any other character set or encoding. ICU's conversion tables are based on charset data collected by IBM over the course of many decades, and is the most complete available anywhere.

Collation: Compare strings according to the conventions and standards of a particular language, region or country. ICU's collation is based on the Unicode Collation Algorithm plus locale-specific comparison rules from the Common Locale Data Repository, a comprehensive source for this type of data.

Formatting: Format numbers, dates, times and currency amounts according the conventions of a chosen locale. This includes translating month and day names into the selected language, choosing appropriate abbreviations, ordering fields correctly, etc. This data also comes from the Common Locale Data Repository.

Time Calculations: Multiple types of calendars are provided beyond the traditional Gregorian calendar. A thorough set of timezone calculation APIs are provided.

Unicode Support: ICU closely tracks the Unicode standard, providing easy access to all of the many Unicode character properties, Unicode Normalization, Case Folding and other fundamental operations as specified by the Unicode Standard.

Regular Expression: ICU's regular expressions fully support Unicode while providing very competitive performance.

Bidi: support for handling text containing a mixture of left to right (English) and right to left (Arabic or Hebrew) data.

Text Boundaries: Locate the positions of words, sentences, paragraphs within a range of text, or identify locations that would be suitable for line wrapping when displaying the text.

And much more. Refer to the ICU User Guide for details.

Not sure exactly how much Qt functionality you'd lose, but it's an optional dependency.

Comment: Re:if that's true, (Score 4, Informative) 453 453

I don't care about whether you can prevent sharing with your friends on FB it whatever, what I care about is me not having to alter my network settings so that if I give you access to my WiFi network, you sharing MY network information with the pwoe you're "friends" with.

Comment: Re:Not Exactly.... (Score 5, Insightful) 453 453

That isn't the issue. The issue is YOU being able to share MY WiFi key because I was dumb enough to let a Windows 10 user on my WiFi network. This is akin to me giving you the keys to my house so you can housesit, and you getting a hundred copies cut and distributing them to a bunch of people you know.

Comment: Re:Every SSD WIFI Password ? (Score 2) 453 453

Thank you for being a friend,
And sharing WiFi passwords there and back again.
You're giving me the WiFi key of your favorite restaurant.

And if they came to your dorm,
Invited everyone you knew,
You would see the ugly guy at the back downloading kiddie porn,
And the FBI would raid you singing "Thank you for filling our jail!"

Comment: Re:No (Score 4, Informative) 453 453

Inflammatory Mode On: Why in the fuck would even want to opt-in to such a service? If it's private WiFi, it's likely to be at my home or my workplace, and in either case I absolutely do not ever want to share that over fucking Fuckbook, Twatter or whatever stupid lame-ass soshial neshworking crap site becomes the next biggest and greatest.

Rational Mode On: Now let's imagine that my organization has a private WiFi hotspot available for employees and a few others. I do not ever want to have those keys shared outside that group, nor should I have to change MY network with an "_optout" on the end of an SSID. I would consider that a breach of security. Sure, I'll probably be able to disable Windows devices that are domain members via GPO, but if they're not actually devices belonging to the organization, or "Pro" versions of Windows where it even knows what the hell Active Directory is, then MY network is being compromised by this service.

This is just a plain bad idea, whether you're being reasonable or inflammatory.

Comment: Re:No, they just need reliable Linux distros. (Score 4, Insightful) 161 161

Maybe it's okay if systemd and PulseAudio fuck up your single Ubuntu workstation. That's not a luxury that these admins have. They need their Linux systems to work reliably all of the time.

Or maybe it's okay if systemd fucks up all the servers running RHEL 7. After all, nothing important runs on that. So let's check, is Red Hat Inc. tanking and considering backtracking? Hell no, they're growing strong both in revenue and profits in the year that's passed since. So if a $14 billion dollar company can make systemd work for them, it probably can't be that bad. Or if it's bad, well then rip out the bad parts like write a non-binary log because how hard could it be to take the binary messages, printf and log the text in addition to/instead of a blob? Sometimes it sounds like the only two options is to drink the kool-aid or nuke it from orbit.

Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no substitute for a good blaster at your side. - Han Solo

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