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Comment: Re:works differently in the states. (Score 1) 246

by AmiMoJo (#49627761) Attached to: USBKill Transforms a Thumb Drive Into an "Anti-Forensic" Device

The worst part is that if you really are a terrorist or paedophile you will take the two years over the punishment for what you really did. What are the chances that when the police realise that you are innocent and they screwed up they flip a few bits in your Truecrypt key so your password doesn't work any more and you go down for a couple of years?

Comment: Re:That's one reason the iPhone is so popular (Score 1) 276

by AmiMoJo (#49627729) Attached to: Google Can't Ignore the Android Update Problem Any Longer

Sounds like a Google Nexus device would be best for you. Currently all devices released in the last 3 years are on the latest OS, and they cost half as much as an iPhone. Why pay twice as much?

An officially supported cyanogen device might suit you too. The OnePlus One really is an iPhone killer for less than 1/3 the price, and extremely customisable.

Comment: Re:Nah. (Score 1) 276

by AmiMoJo (#49627721) Attached to: Google Can't Ignore the Android Update Problem Any Longer

The security angle is overblown anyway. The OS is secure, and we don't see vast phone botnets or millions of victims with huge phone bills from SMS spam. The only malware we see get any traction requires the user to install it willingly, and even then it will often be blocked instantly by Google's blacklist.

Comment: Re:Some good data... (Score 1) 276

by AmiMoJo (#49627707) Attached to: Google Can't Ignore the Android Update Problem Any Longer

Update Play to the latest version and you will get security updates. You must have disabled updates for it because 2.2 is supported.

As for crashing apps, you can stick with the old versions that came with your phone if you like. It sounds like turning updates on again would be a good idea though.

Having said that, the device is 5 years old. I don't know of any company that provides updates for phones that old, except Google.

Comment: Re:Some good data... (Score 1) 276

by AmiMoJo (#49627693) Attached to: Google Can't Ignore the Android Update Problem Any Longer

Users of older versions of the OS do get security updates via Play.

Devices running 2.x must be very old stock. Around here even the cheapest devices are on 4.x. Well there are some feature phones where the ability to install or customise anything has been disabled that might be older, but there is only so much Google can do when the OS is open source.

Comment: Re:Battery life non-issue (Score 1) 110

I would expect that for most apps, it won't reduce power consumption.

Why would you expect that? What apps will be able to do will be extremely curtailed - e.g. they will probably follow the original iPhone model of halting the process whenever the user isn't using it. Aside from the display, the radio is probably the biggest power draw on the system, plus there won't be any length negotiation with the phone, so having non-background applications run directly on the device will probably help battery life, not harm it.

Comment: Re:This seems batshit crazy. (Score 1) 173

by Kjella (#49627173) Attached to: Police Can Obtain Cellphone Location Records Without a Warrant

Would the government need a warrant to compel your mother to turn over all the letters she's sent to you over the years, so they can retro-actively track your location in an attempt to link you to crimes?

Not sure the analogy is good as the content, yes obviously. If you're a fugitive from the law but they suspect your mom is secretly sending you letters do they need a warrant to read the mailing address? Probably not, a court order will probably do since it's information that the post office obviously must have in order to deliver it, just like the number you dialed.

Comment: Re:This seems batshit crazy. (Score 1) 173

by Kjella (#49627151) Attached to: Police Can Obtain Cellphone Location Records Without a Warrant

It is still a BS ruling. If I am in my own home making a phone call (I don't have a land line) I definitely have an expectation of privacy; location, content, and otherwise. Existing law already says that.

The "privacy of your own home" only extends as far as you keep your actions private, if you post home videos on YouTube they don't get the same protection as you have against the police planting a spy camera in your house. When you make a call, you're volunteering information to the phone company about where you are and who you'd like to call, you don't get any extra expectation of privacy from doing it from your own home.

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