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Comment: Re:It's Official. Firefox has jumped the shark! (Score 1) 266

by Zerimar (#35749624) Attached to: Firefox 5 Scheduled For June 21 Release
This is totally subjective. Extensibility it clearly loses out to everyone - Microsoft and it's corporate customers do not want it to be extensible, so I doubt it will be. In terms of speed, I think Chrome/Firefox/IE/Opera are all fast enough. They all load quickly, render pages quickly, execute Javascript quickly - a lot of this is thanks to Chrome pushing that envelope, but everyone else seems to have caught up by now. For the first time in a long time, I am of the opinion that all of the major browsers for Windows are good enough. It basically comes down to personal preference at this point. I typically use Chrome as my primary browser and IE9 for the handful of random sites that don't quite work properly with Chrome.

Comment: Re:Time (Score 2) 193

by Zerimar (#35631590) Attached to: Turning Your E-Reader Into a Cheap Tablet
BS, it takes a half hour, tops. Following this wiki http://nookdevs.com/NookColor_Rooting will walk you through it. The only decision you have to make it deciding which software version of nookCOLOR you have. The only reason it would take longer is if you are messing with replacing the whole system, but a basic root with marketplace support takes very little time at all.

Comment: Re:Wow, that would be redonkulously profitable. (Score 1) 325

by Zerimar (#35214658) Attached to: AMD Sale to Dell Rumored
A huge portion (if not most) of the profits come from the enterprise space, where often you buy the biggest, best servers. Sure, for an average desktop a cheap AMD chip might be a better choice, but for an enterprise server (or a high end VM server), performance is king and AMD isn't even competitive.

Comment: Re:I think Madden is schitzo...... (Score 1) 124

by Zerimar (#35130438) Attached to: EA Simulation Correctly Picked Super Bowl Champs in September
That's only partially true. The betting odds and lines are not there to predict a winner - they are there to try and get equal money on each side of the table. More often than not, the end result is that it is pretty accurate, but that's largely due to wisdom of crowds. Predicting winners is not goal of the people who set the lines. As for the other comment, no team in any sport will be overwhelming favorites to win at the beginning of the season, due to the vagaries of small sample sizes. Picking the Phillies to make the playoffs in Major League Baseball is a safe bet - after 162 games, generally talent wins out (they are -300 to win their division). But give them three additional playoffs series after that, each of which is a race to four games, and luck plays a much larger role (+200 to win the World Series). The NFL is even more difficult (New England +500) because the season itself is so short that luck plays a much bigger role all year long.

Comment: Re:What they mean (Score 1) 217

by Zerimar (#35073612) Attached to: Firewalls Make DDoS Attacks Worse
Amen. Take for instance Cisco's biggest, baddest firewall - it can handle 2 million concurrent connections. Do people realize how trivially easy it is to to create 2 million connections? After you fill the connection table, it's game over. Other firewall vendors have similar breaking points - it's just a matter of how big your connection table can become. Also, with the rise of SSL on public facing web servers, firewalls are little more than stateful bottlenecks waiting to explode - there's not higher level protections there. People stick with them for regulatory reasons, but they provide very little protection in many, many scenarios.

Comment: Re:Fingers crossed... (Score 2) 146

by Zerimar (#34609426) Attached to: Intel's Atom To Ship In Over 35 Tablets Next Year
I've seen a lot of apps in the market saying they don't work with the Samsung Galaxy S line of phones - your post helps me understand why. Is there any company doing more harm to the Android ecosystem than Samsung? HTC and Motorola stay pretty close to Google's Android, and seem to benefit from it. Samsung needs to wake up.

Comment: Re:Okay... (Score 3, Funny) 443

by Zerimar (#34198186) Attached to: UK Games Retailers Threaten Boycott of Steam Games
But Valve (and to a lesser degree, Blizzard) is almost single handedly keeping PC Gaming alive and well. Steam has been amazing for the PC gaming ecosystem - especially for the little guys. Does World of Goo get noticed without Steam? Probably not. Defense Grid? I doubt it. Puzzle Quest and it's derivatives? Nope. Crayon Physics? No. Plants vs Zombies took off with help from Steam as well, although Popcap is a fairly large developer at this point. I'm against DRM as much as the next guy, but I stick up for Valve and Steam. So far they have a proven track record of being very customer friendly as well as being fairly developer friendly. They are unique in that they seem to be the only company doing AAA cross platform games that puts the PC first. When developers like Bioware are making their PC games feel like ports (and stripping features as in Dragon Age: Origins 2), Valve is still out there supporting Team Fortress 2, and the Left4Dead series first and foremost on the PC.

Comment: Re:Hurray! (Score 1) 283

by Zerimar (#33903398) Attached to: Opera Embraces Extensions For v.11
I was in the same boat as you, although I couldn't switch to Firefox - it was way too slow. I ended up switching to Chrome - with three plugins (Speed Dial, Smooth Gestures, RSS Subscription Extension), I was close enough in feature parity to be happy. The only thing I'm really missing is that Opera would not close when you closed your last tab, but Chrome does. Everything else works about the same (other than no built in e-mail, bit torrent, news, unite, etc.), but that one still bothers me. The nice benefit - more sites work in Chrome, and Chrome feels a tad bit faster.

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