Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Homeschool, then Public school (Score 1) 700

by ZephyrAlfredo (#48980811) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Pros and Cons of Homeschooling?

Even in the public system, how fast children learn to read is strongly correlated with their family environment, so you might as well keep them home to start. Also most parents are fully capable of teaching basic reading, writing, and arithmetic. It's in the later grades, especially high school, when trained teachers are essential.

The Media

BBC's Open Player Claims Not Followed Through 311

Posted by timothy
from the working-on-it-working-on-it dept.
ruphus13 writes "BBC's iPlayer was originally built on Microsoft's DRM-protected technology, and has never really been liked by folks like the FSF. The BBC is trying to play nice, though, recently claiming, 'the BBC has always been a strong advocate and driver of open industry standards. Without these standards, TV and radio broadcasting would simply not function. I believe that the time has come for the BBC to start adopting open standards such as H.264 and AAC for our audio and video services on the web.' This article argues that actions speak louder than words, and this is where the BBC falls short. 'The fact that both AAC and H.264 are encumbered with patent licenses that make their distribution under free licenses problematic flies in the face of this definition. It's good to see a major organization like the BBC switching from closely held secretive codecs to more widespread and documented ones. But it would be even better to see them throw their considerable weight behind some truly open formats.'"

% APL is a natural extension of assembler language programming; ...and is best for educational purposes. -- A. Perlis

Working...