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Submission + - WikiLeaks Cats Are Out Of The Bag (

Stoobalou writes: The leak of hundreds of thousands of secret cables sent to and from US embassies around the world has severely embarrassed the country's politicians and diplomats.

The rest of us can start having a laugh at the can of worms the release of the 250,000 documents has opened.

The documents which were sent to WikiLeaks and shown to a number of newspapers prior to publication on the whistle-blowing web site, contain masses of information, much of which — as the US authorities predicted — is likely to damage US relationships around the world for years to come.

Submission + - The Pirate Bay Appeal Verdict: Guilty Again (

An anonymous reader writes: The verdict against three people associated with The Pirate Bay just been announced. The Swedish Appeal Court found Peter Sunde, Fredrik Neij and Carl Lundström guilty of “contributory copyright infringement” and handed down prison sentences ranging from 4 to 10 months plus damages of more than $6.5 million in total.

In April last year the Stockholm Court sentenced the ‘The Pirate Bay Four’ to one year in prison and a fine of $905,000 each. The defendants immediately announced that they would appeal the decision and the case went before the Appeal Court two months ago.

Today, Friday November 26, the Swedish Appeal Court announced its decision. Compared to the District Court ruling, the court has decreased the prison sentences for the three defendants, but increased the damages that have to be paid to the entertainment industries.

“The Pirate Bay has facilitated illegal file-sharing in a way that results in criminal liability for those who run the service. For the three defendants the court of appeal believes it is proven that they participated in these activities in different ways and to varying degrees,” the court stated.

The court did consider the individual input of all three, which resulted in varying prison sentences ranging from 4 to 10 months . The total damages of 46 million kroner ($6.5 million) will be equally shared among Peter Sunde, Fredrik Neij and Carl Lundström.

Peter Sunde (born September 13, 1978) alias ‘brokep’
Guilty of contributory copyright infringement
8 months in prison
A share of the $6.5 million in damages

Fredrik Neij (born April 27, 1978) alias ‘TiAMO’:
Guilty of contributory copyright infringement
10 months in prison
A share of the $6.5 million in damages

Carl Lundström (born April 13, 1960)
Guilty of contributory copyright infringement
4 months in prison
A share of the $6.5 million in damages

The total damages are higher than in the District Court ruling. “This is because the court of appeal, to a greater extent than the district court, accepted the plaintiff companies’ evidence of its losses as a result of file-sharing,” the court noted.

All Nordic entertainment industry companies get the entire amount they asked for, and the remaining companies get about half of what they requested.

The fourth defendant, Gottfrid Svartholm, is not included in the verdict because he was absent at the court hearings due to medical circumstances. His case will be reviewed later.

“This was a political trial from the start and it must be resolved politically,” Rick Falkvinge, leader of the Pirate Party said in a response to the verdict. “The public has lost all confidence in the justice system in these matters, and it is beyond sad that the courts still persist in running special-interest justice.”

Entertainment industry insiders, on the other hand, applauded the verdict. “It’s a relief that the court of appeal finally affirmed that you’ll be sent to prison if you carry out this type of activity,” movie industry lawyer Monique Wadsted said.

Although none of the defendants has officially commented on how to proceed, it is very likely that this will not be the end of the case. It is expected that it eventually will go all the way to the Supreme Court.

Whatever happens next, not much will change for the users of the popular BitTorrent indexer. The Pirate Bay website will remain online and operating as usual. None of the defendants are involved in the site anymore, and all assets are reportedly owned by the Seychelles based company Reservella.

Submission + - U.S Government Seizes Torrent Search Engine Domain (

Voulnet writes: This morning, visitors to the site are greeted with an ominous graphic which indicates that ICE have seized the site’s domain.
“My domain has been seized without any previous complaint or notice from any court!” the exasperated owner of Torrent-Finder told TorrentFreak this morning.

“I firstly had DNS downtime. While I was contacting GoDaddy I noticed the DNS had changed. Godaddy had no idea what was going on and until now they do not understand the situation and they say it was totally from ICANN,” he explained.

Aside from the fact that domains are being seized seemingly at will, there is a very serious problem with the action against Torrent-Finder. Not only does the site not host or even link to any torrents whatsoever, it actually only returns searches through embedded iframes which display other sites that are not under the control of the Torrent-Finder owner.

Submission + - Flyer Arrested(?) After Declining to Show ID (

Sherri Davidoff writes: "Today a traveler going through the Albuquerque airport was detained and is reportedly in the process of arrest after politely refusing to show his ID. Phil Mocek, a Seattle area native, was traveling with his friend Jesse Gallagos when he politely declined to show ID to TSA agents."

Submission + - Does SORBS matter anymore? ( 1 writes: "As an employee of a well-known VPS provider, I've been observing another employee's efforts to deal with irresponsible behavior on the part of SORBS, a well-known blacklist provider. Although their mission of providing a resource that system administrators can use to gauge the likelihood of spam originating from a particular IP or netblock is admirable, we've encountered consistent issues related to their assertions with a newly assigned block from ARIN. Jed puts it best:

We recently received a large allocation of IP addresses from ARIN and, to our chagrin, the block is listed on SORBS's list as dynamic IP space — a whole /20 worth of addresses. It has been listed since April and we received it in May. What this means is that to incoming mail servers, all of our customers in this block appear like home customers with a cable or DSL connection (who should not be sending mail).

Obviously, as a hosting company we assign a static to each VPS we provision. Our IP allocations are is in no way dynamic; customers may request an IP address change, but we don't receive many such requests. We always ask for justification, and the requests we approve are typically performed on a "one time only" basis. Jed continues:

I approached SORBS about the issue via their automatic contact system. It has been nearly two weeks since their "bot" replied to me and informed me that most of the block was not eligible for delisting due to the naming convention in our reverse DNS PTRs. We use:

What's wrong with that? It "looks" dynamic, they say.

Despite our attempts to reach out to SORBS, explain our position, and get our IP space delisted, we've being told that we must change our reverse DNS naming scheme across our entire network to be considered for delisting. Needless to say, we consider this a ridiculous proposition.

Our primary concern is that mail administrators are using SORBS to blindly drop mail based on the false "dynamic IP" assertion. Although we would consider such a practice to be irresponsible from an administrator's standpoint, this is an issue that's been raised by some of our customers, and we're concerned about the effect it may be having on their ability to deliver legitimate mail. We've always taken an aggressive stance against anything resembling spammy behavior on our network; we're all I.T. veterans, we all despise spam, and we promptly handle any reports of abuse related to our network. It's distressing to see this situation going unresolved. What advice do members of the Slashdot community have on this topic?"

United States

Journal Journal: Al Gore Won the Nobel Peace Prize 17


Ahem. Allow me to elaborate.

Whatever you think of the science of climate change, the fact is that this is the first time the Nobel Peace Prize to someone for doing something the effect of which on peace is purely hypothetical.

"Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb. "Necessity is the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth. -- Alfred North Whitehead