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Comment Re:Let them lease, but not screw with sales (Score 1) 231

The real reason we see this is twofold - first, because of manufacturing and second, because of fraud.

No, you missed the third -- and most important -- reason: if the corporate oligarchy can abolish the concept of property rights (only for "consumers," of course), they can turn us all into serfs and force to rent everything from them in perpetuity.

Comment Re:Let them lease, but not screw with sales (Score 1) 231

Playing the devil's advocate... Where exactly is our "right to repair" granted? Is it in the constitution? Is it a bill signed into law?

What part of the concept of "ownership of property" do you not understand? It's been a fucking axiom of English common law since before English common law even existed!

Comment Re:I have an idea (Score 3, Insightful) 578

If we would open drilling even more in the US and more publicly support fracking, we could never use another drop of middle eastern oil again.

Don't you dumbasses realize that we're using their oil so that when it runs out we'll still have ours left? Leaving our oil in the ground for as long as possible gives us a strategic advantage, and squandering that for short-term economic gain isn't "conservative," it's just goddamn fucking stupid!

Comment Re: Micropayments? (Score 2) 214

Well, part of it is that even a small payment can still incur a psychologically large cost. If each user post here on /. cost one cent to read, would you want to have them load automatically? Probably not, many of them are not worth that much, and you could quickly run up a bill of a few hundred dollars a year on that sort of thing from this site alone. So instead you'd have to take more time to think about what was worth spending even a little on, because it adds up and the price doesn't really match the value to you of the thing you'd be paying for.

Something similar happens when people have metered or capped Internet usage compared to at least nominally unlimited usage.

You really can't avoid this problem unless the micropayment is so small that it is likely not worth the cost to implement. I suppose if I knew that a year's worth of micro payments for me, for everything I use, was no more than about a dollar a year in total, it wouldn't be so much that it would feel like I was wasting money on the Internet. But because the average user doesn't want to spend a noticeable amount ever, and there really aren't that many users in comparison to sites, the resulting pie of money wouldn't be much to split up. (Especially once you reduce the amount to account for lower average incomes elsewhere in the world)

Comment Re:Fork (Score 5, Informative) 351

You'd think that a 2d image editor should be a fairly simple job, something handled mostly by standard libraries now.

Isn't that what they're trying to do? Last I heard, they were working on implementing a clean library, GEGL and then they were going to rewrite GIMP to use it.

Comment Re:Defendants screwed up (Score 1) 129

Damnit, you made me go look it up!

I'm talking about 17 U.S.C. section 117:

(a)Making of Additional Copy or Adaptation by Owner of Copy.â"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106, it is not an infringement for the owner of a copy of a computer program to make or authorize the making of another copy or adaptation of that computer program provided: (1) that such a new copy or adaptation is created as an essential step in the utilization of the computer program in conjunction with a machine and that it is used in no other manner, or

Comment Re:GM producers are shooting themselves in the foo (Score 1) 514

On a basic economic-theory level, competition depends on the consumer being able to make a well-informed choice. Therefore, any attempt to hide information from the consumer is anti-competitive. IMO, it's also immoral. In other words, there is always a reason for the government to require it to be labeled because everything should be labeled by default!

Therefore, if you want to justify failing to label GMOs, you need an actual compelling reason why restricting that information is in the overriding public interest. (And neither "it hasn't been proven to be unsafe" nor even "we've proven it to be safe" are compelling reasons. Even if it's safe, what justifies withholding the information? Nothing!)

Comment Re:On this I side with facebook (Score 2) 147

Option 2: Active editors. These forums are cultivated, maintained, and very ban-heavy. As a side-effect, the forum can be held responsible for third-party content.

Not true in the US (other than, potentially, with copyright issues and the like).

Remember, the CDA was intended to encourage providers to engage in censorship. Since the previous state of affairs was as you suggest, the way that they were encouraged to censor was to remove liability for material posted by third parties. But since many sites don't care, and the CDA protects them fully no matter what they do or don't do, it didn't really work out. Also other parts of the CDA turned out to be unconstitutional.

"For the love of phlegm...a stupid wall of death rays. How tacky can ya get?" - Post Brothers comics