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Comment: Re:Huh (Score 1) 258

Heat problem must be already solved, see the battlemaster ppc example. Also, while I can't imagine mounting an avenger cannon in a vehicle other than a warthog, I also can't imagine turning it into a giant pistol, either. I imagine that if I could do one, the other would be, if not easily achievable, at least something a good engineer skilled in the art could accomplish.

You know, I haven't had a conversation like this since rec.games.mecha died off. .. Brings back memories.

Comment: Re:Huh (Score 1) 258

by Zak3056 (#48682115) Attached to: Newest Stealth Fighter's Ground Attack Sensors 10 Years Behind Older Jets'

Yeah, I get the in universe explanation, what I question is why this was an issue in the first place. A mech carrying around a giant pistol should be all the inspiration you need to get from point a to point b , and it's not like it's a big engineering challenge given that you already managed to modularize the thing into a pistol form factor to begin with (especially when you civilization is keeping FTL travel going with spot and balling wire... You've got to have some seriously talented engineers).

Maybe they just had really aggressive patent attorneys in the star league era? Like "on the internet" patents turned into "on a battlemech" patents and ComStar held the IP with multi century terms, while the clans were the actual successor (no pun intended) in interest... The whole battle of Tukayyid thing was actually over who owned the omnimech rights, which is why they called it a trial. Make about as much sense as the actual storyline, I guess.

Comment: Re:The Future is Surreal (Score 3, Insightful) 285

by Zak3056 (#48629047) Attached to: At 40, a person is ...

A few years ago I looked at the numbers and realized I've been officially a woman for the majority of
my life. OK, yeah, I'm one of those. One of those who is very good with Linux kernels, MySQL, VoIP, and
various other technologies. Deal with it. I'm me, I like being me, and I wouldn't have it any other way.

You're 53 years old, posting as AC, and feel the need to announce that you're a transsexual and dare anyone to have a problem with you? FWIW, I don't think it's the world that has a problem with you--it seems like you have a problem with the world.

Comment: Re:what an embrace means. (Score 3, Insightful) 217

by Zak3056 (#48621789) Attached to: What Will Microsoft's "Embrace" of Open Source Actually Achieve?

Back in the day, Microsoft viewed open source and Linux as a threat and did its best to retaliate with FUD and patent threats.

then in 2013 Microsoft suffered a loss of more than US$32 billion

MS had an after-tax income of over 21 billion dollars in 2013. No idea where you're coming up with a $32B loss. Ballmer was a horrible CEO, but the biggest problem was that MS continued to make money--LOTS of money--while he was destroying the company's value, which made him look absolutely great on paper.

Comment: Re:Zoning laws are tyranny (Score 1) 605

by Zak3056 (#48604799) Attached to: Waze Causing Anger Among LA Residents

Zoning laws prevent you from doing what you want with your property... They are evil and, obviously, a magnet for graft and other corruption.

Houston, for example, is not any worse without them...

That actually answers something I was wondering about the other day. My company was looking at a facility in Houston and it's in a brand new industrial park that is literally across the street from some of multi-million dollar homes I was amazed that the homeowners didn't manage to kill the project, and now I understand why they couldn't.

FWIW, I think zoning is like any other form of government intervention: a necessary evil. Some is absolutely required, a little more is ok, and it's only when those in power have an axe to grind, or engage in mission creep that the problems start. I'd honestly hate to live somewhere without at least rudimentary zoning, lest someone come along and build a sewage treatment next door, or put in heavy industry across the street from your $5M house like the example above.

Comment: Re:latency doesn't matter for video, bw, jitter do (Score 1) 200

by Zak3056 (#48321777) Attached to: Net Neutrality Alone Won't Solve ISP Throttling Abuse, Here's Why

A low latency application is ssh/telnet or any other text based interactive protocol.

I disagree quite strongly with the above--text based interfaces really don't become unusable until you hit absurd latency (>2500ms). ssh/telnet are quite usable at >1000ms latency, and even high packet loss isn't really a huge concern. Even working over 110bps links, where one could actually type faster than the line rate wasn't a real problem until you filled up the buffer (I can't give you examples of what latency was like under those conditions, because I never measured it, but you've got 200ms or so built in RTT for a single byte from the bit rate alone)

Comment: Re:Why not? When you have kids.. (Score 2) 323

by Zak3056 (#48165663) Attached to: Court Rules Parents May Be Liable For What Their Kids Post On Facebook

Well, now that's just not true. None of the amendments in the Bill of Rights are absolute. Not one. They were not intended to be absolute, either, according to the Founders. Every single one has exceptions.

The constitution, as written, is a whitelist of things the government is allowed to do. The bill of rights is a list of examples of things it is not allowed to do. This suggestion that there are exceptions has no basis in the text of either one. I'll never understand how some people can read, "congress shall make no law," "shall not be infringed," "no person shall be deprived of life liberty or property without due process of law," and other similar statements and come up with "this isn't absolute."

Comment: Re:Oh good (Score 1) 907

by Zak3056 (#47997753) Attached to: Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

There's a reason the entire summary is in a quote bar. Most of them these days are ripped directly from the article.

I wouldn't blame the submitter too quickly. I've had submissions accepted, and had my summary ripped completely out in favor of just a blurb from the article, so it's quite possible the editor did it in this case.

Comment: Re:A little scary (Score 3, Insightful) 188

As far as I can tell, there really wasn't a cover-up. It was mostly when Republicans got a hold of the story and tried to have someone's head for it that bureaucrats started to circle the wagons.

Wait, what? Are you seriously suggesting that it's not a coverup because the coverup didn't start until people started asking questions?

Comment: Re:This is good! (Score 1) 528

by Zak3056 (#47767829) Attached to: Limiting the Teaching of the Scientific Process In Ohio

A friend of mine from Georgia (the US state) described his high school biology lecture on evolution as "OK, today I'm legally required to tech evolution. We all believe in Jesus, right? OK, next topic."

I went to a catholic elementary school, and one of my 6th grade teachers was a nun named Sister Catherine-Joseph who taught two subjects: religion and science. Despite the obvious setup for failure, she taught both rigorously, and well. I HATED that woman with a passion, but she was, absolutely, a superior educator who would have smacked the shit out of someone with a ruler for daring to suggest that, "We all believe in Jesus, *wink wink*" was either suitable coverage or a valid refutation of evolution.

Comment: Re:Gravity isn't SF (Score 4, Insightful) 180

by Zak3056 (#47721871) Attached to: The 2014 Hugo Awards

Good science fiction is (almost) ALWAYS about people, and how they react in an environment that is altered by a technology, or an event, or some other external influence that simply wasn't imaginable until our understanding of the universe progressed (the science part of the fiction). While there are some examples that differ from this, if you take a look through your favorite stories, they almost all conform to this pattern.

In this case, it's an exploration of what happens to someone who is in orbit during an event that leads to Kessler Syndrome. I'm not saying the film deserved to win, but I think complaining that "this isn't science fiction" is decidedly unwarranted.

Comment: Re:Political Absurdism (Score 1) 69

The problem with your position is that L3's own data shows the port at over 100% utilization. They're not being throttled, they're trying to shove ten pounds of shit into a five pound bag.

Like I said, you can point fingers at whoever the peer is for letting the situation fester, but L3's own data suggests this was passive aggressive rather than active malice.

Software production is assumed to be a line function, but it is run like a staff function. -- Paul Licker

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