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Comment: Re:JSON Sucks (Score 1) 68

Does JSON support namespaces? AFAIK it doesn't, and that would seem to make it suitable only for fairly simple data interchange and not really scalable. As far as which is best visually... XML is a bit wordy/busy, especially if it uses a lot namespaces, but it's a pretty minor problem given that with both XML and JSON, it's a piece of piss to write a nice visual editor. The important thing for me is having a solid platform for building applications, and XML has the capability and maturity for that - even if it is a bit ugly!

I know it's bad-form replying to my own post, but it does appear that there is some kind of namespacing going on in the OData spec. Does anyone know if this namespacing is part of the JSON standard, or is it just a convention that OASIS are using?

Eitherway, I still prefer XML! :D

Comment: Re:JSON Sucks (Score 1) 68

Does JSON support namespaces? AFAIK it doesn't, and that would seem to make it suitable only for fairly simple data interchange and not really scalable.

As far as which is best visually... XML is a bit wordy/busy, especially if it uses a lot namespaces, but it's a pretty minor problem given that with both XML and JSON, it's a piece of piss to write a nice visual editor.

The important thing for me is having a solid platform for building applications, and XML has the capability and maturity for that - even if it is a bit ugly!

Comment: Re:Tesco (Score 1) 162

In July 2012 I was searching for car insurance and found it hilarious that More-Than's (morethan.com) password policy at the time was:
  • Be between 8 and 14 characters
  • Not include more than 2 repeated characters in a row
  • Not include the word 'guest'
  • Not contain swear words

Obviously they're storing the password, and at a guess, the reason for no-swear-words is that their call-centre staff confirm your identity with your password... or something? Whatever. But what's up with not including "guest" in there? It must be some kind of magic keyword that makes their system do something different or something!!

I didn't get my insurance with them in the end!

Comment: Re:Still open legally (Score 1) 194

by Zaiff Urgulbunger (#46448077) Attached to: Google Blocking Asus's Android-Windows "Duet"?

It's still open in the sense that legally you can do whatever you want with it. It's up to you if you want to make Google happy or not.

Google can deny you from adding Google's apps and services on it, though, and the moment you ship an Android-device without those you're removing a lot of the reason for why an Average Jane or Joe would want an Android-device in the first place.

True, but it's worth noting that that Microsoft is well positioned to fill those gaps (assuming we're specifically talking about an app-store, search, email and maps). Whilst I do appreciate that Android without the Google bits and with no alternatives is a bit crap, it seems a bit unfair to blame Google for that. That'd be like if Microsoft open-sourced Windows and gave it away for free, and then complaining that they didn't include MS Office.

Comment: Re:Oh, yeah, THAT will work (Score 1) 33

by Zaiff Urgulbunger (#46436437) Attached to: Amplify Education's New Intel Tablet Begs For Abuse

"Here are your new tablets, kids. They're ruggedized so that they resist breaking!" *CRACK!* "Now, Tommy, why did you do that? Of course smashing it against the desk will break it!"

This. I recall from my childhood having to "test" both shatter-proof rulers (for some reason when you're aged 8 shatter-proof = indestructible = must test this) and water-resistant watches (when you're 8 years old, water-resistant = completely water-proof).

"Atomic batteries to power, turbines to speed." -- Robin, The Boy Wonder

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