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Submission + - Microsoft Calls Windows 10 the 'Most Secure Windows Ever'->

invictusvoyd writes: Security has never been The selling point of Microsoft operating systems in the past. It seems that Microsoft is now trying to sell its latest product on its weakest link."Windows 10 has more built-in security protections to help safeguard you against viruses, phishing and malware, it's the most secure Windows ever," blogged the company's Windows Team. "New features are now delivered through automatic updates, helping you to stay current and your system to feel fresh, so you're free to do."
Link to Original Source

Submission + - UK to give 18-year-olds right to delete embarrassing online past->

An anonymous reader writes: People aged 18 and older could soon be allowed to delete embarrassing photographs of themselves from social networks as part of a government-backed scheme.

The iRights campaign will allow young adults to remove incriminating photos of themselves from Twitter and Facebook which could affect them in later life. The move is similar to legislation which came into force in California this year that gave teens rights to delete personal information online.

However, unlike in California, there are currently no plans to introduce a law in the UK forcing technology companies to oblige.

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Comment Re:But... but? (Score 2) 164 164

I have the same - an old account for my videos and I have tried to avoid the Google+ account as much as possible, so it's just good that it disappears. One headache less.

Now if Facebook could disappear too.

I don't have any problem with the account verification though - it's just a variant of the 2-factor authentication so don't complain too much, it may prevent you from getting your account hijacked.

Submission + - Debian Drops SPARC Platform Support

jones_supa writes: As SPARC isn't exactly the most alive architecture anymore, Debian operating system is dropping support for the platform, told Joerg Jaspert last week in the "debian-sparc" mailing list. He noted that this does not block a later comeback as "sparc64". Following that announcement, a recent one tells us that SPARC support was just removed from the unstable, experimental and jessie-updates channels.

Submission + - LinkedIn (temporarily) backs down after uproar at contact export removal->

Mark Wilson writes: LinkedIn caused a storm a couple of days ago when it removed the option to instantly download contacts. Many users of the professional social network were more than a little irked to discover that while contact exporting was still available, a wait of up to three days had been put in place.

Unsurprisingly, users revolted, having been particularly upset by the fact the change was implemented with no warning or announcement. But the company has managed to turn things around by quickly backtracking on its decision after listening to a stream of complaints on Twitter.

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Submission + - Modernizing the Copyright Office-> 1 1

An anonymous reader writes: Joshua Simmons has written a new article discussing the growing consensus that it is time to modernize the Copyright Office. It reviews the developments that led to the last major revision of the Copyright Act; discusses Congress's focus since 1976 on narrower copyright bills, rather than a wholesale revision of U.S. copyright law, and the developments that have led to the review hearings; and considers the growing focus on Copyright Office modernization.
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Submission + - Plan To Run Anti-Google Smear Campaign Revealed in MPAA Emails

vivaoporto writes: Techdirt reports a plan to run anti-Google smear campaign via Today Show and WSJ discovered in MPAA Emails.

Despite the resistance of the Hollywood studios to comply with the subpoenas obtained by Google concerning their relationship with Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood (whose investigation of the company appeared to actually be run by the MPAA and the studios themselves) one of the few emails that Google have been able to get access to so far was revealed this Thursday in a filling. It's an email between the MPAA and two of Jim Hood's top lawyers in the Mississippi AG's office, discussing the big plan to "hurt" Google.

The lawyers from Hood's office flat out admit that they're expecting the MPAA and the major studios to have its media arms run a coordinated propaganda campaign of bogus anti-Google stories:

Media: We want to make sure that the media is at the NAAG meeting. We propose working with MPAA (Vans), Comcast, and NewsCorp (Bill Guidera) to see about working with a PR firm to create an attack on Google (and others who are resisting AG efforts to address online piracy). This PR firm can be funded through a nonprofit dedicated to IP issues. The "live buys" should be available for the media to see, followed by a segment the next day on the Today Show (David green can help with this). After the Today Show segment, you want to have a large investor of Google (George can help us determine that) come forward and say that Google needs to change its behavior/demand reform. Next, you want NewsCorp to develop and place an editorial in the WSJ emphasizing that Google's stock will lose value in the face of a sustained attack by AGs and noting some of the possible causes of action we have developed.

As Google notes in its legal filing about this email, the "plan" states that if this effort fails, then the next step will be to file the subpoena (technically a CID or "civil investigatory demand") on Google, written by the MPAA but signed by Hood.

As Google points out, this makes it pretty clear that the MPAA, studios and Hood were working hand in hand in all of this and that the subpoena had no legitimate purpose behind it, but rather was the final step in a coordinated media campaign to pressure Google to change the way its search engine works.
Twitter

Twitter Yanks Tweets That Repeat Copyrighted Joke 140 140

Mark Wilson writes at Beta News: Can a joke be copyrighted? Twitter seems to think so. As spotted by Twitter account Plagiarism is Bad a number of tweets that repeat a particular joke are being hidden from view. The tweets have not been deleted as such, but their text has been replaced with a link to Twitter's Copyright and DMCA policy. Quality of the joke itself aside -- no accounting for taste -- this seems a strange move for a site and service which is largely based around verbatim retransmission of other people's low-character-count declarations, recipes, questions, and Yes, jokes.

Submission + - Twitter censors plagiarized tweets that repeat copyrighted joke->

Mark Wilson writes: Can a joke be copyrighted? Twitter seems to think so. As spotted by Twitter account Plagiarism is Bad a number of tweets that repeat a particular joke are being hidden from view. The tweets have not been deleted as such, but their text has been replaced with a link to Twitter's Copyright and DMCA policy.

The joke in question? "Saw someone spill their high end juice cleanse all over the sidewalk and now I know god is on my side." Perform a search for the text and, while you will find several tweeted instances of it available at the moment, there are many examples of tweets that have been censored.

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Comment Re:BBC / other state broadcasters? (Score 3, Informative) 132 132

Well - it's a disadvantage - and an advantage. But the primary problem is not really the national broadcasters. It's when you actually want to pay for something to view like Netflix - or buy a DVD/BluRay.

National broadcasters can select if they want to provide streams of their shows to other viewers or not. Many countries in Europe have the same system as the UK - public funding.

Comment Re:HP died when Agilent was spun off (Score 1) 463 463

I remember when that split happened, I was on a brief visit to HP in Böblingen that day when they went public with the split.

My thought then "Are they brainfucked?".

History reveals that - yes, they were then and haven't become better. No problems with the engineers at HP, they try to perform as well as they can given the conditions but the problem lies within marketing and product strategy - which are following management wishes.

But in any large organization there's bound to grow a lot of dead meat between the layers - people that don't produce anything and just are overhead. But any attempt to cut them off means that they start to sabotage the process of restructuring and put up virtual obstacles everywhere to try to make themselves important.

You are in a maze of little twisting passages, all different.

Working...