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Submission + - NetBSD 6.0 has shipped (netbsd.org)

Madwand writes: The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 6.0, the fourteenth major release of the NetBSD operating system. Changes from the previous release include scalability improvements on multi-core systems, many new and updated device drivers, Xen and MIPS port improvements, and brand new features such as a new packet filter.

Some NetBSD 6.0 highlights are: support for thread-local storage (TLS), Logical Volume Manager (LVM) functionality, rewritten disk quota subsystem, new subsystems to handle flash devices and NAND controllers, an experimental CHFS file system designed for flash devices, support for Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) protocol, and more. This release also introduces NPF — a new packet filter, designed with multi-core systems in mind, which can do TCP/IP traffic filtering, stateful inspection, and network address translation (NAT).

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What happens if you Open Source, and in doing so violate a Patent? 1

An anonymous reader writes: We have developed a fairly useful Video Processing algorithm that we are thinking of open sourcing in 2013. There is one snag however: There are hundreds of imaging and image/video processing Patents that have been granted over the years, and some (small) part of our algorithm may violate one or more of these patents accidentally. Checking our work against the mountain of imaging patents out there is unfeasible. It would take a team of 5 months to do that. It doesn't help that many of these patents use obscure mathematical notations and formulae that make it difficult to decipher quickly precisely what the patent holder has patented. Now suppose that we open source our algorithm, and it turns out that it violates one or more patents. Could we get sued for damages because we open sourced it, and hundreds or thousands of people are now using it for free? It could take the patent holder months or years to identify that their patent is being violated, by which time our algorithm may have thousands of users. To sum it up: If you open source something that — accidentally — violates somebodys patent somewhere, what happens to you? Do you get sued for damages or forced to pay a high license fee? Do you have to shut the Open Source project down and take all files offline? Has anyone been in such a situation before? Are there any legal mechanisms or protections that shield you in a case like this? Thanks for any advice!

Submission + - PHP 5.3 released (php.net)

Parker Lewis writes: "PHP 5.3 is finally released, with some long waited features like namespaces (with the unpopular backslash as namespace separator), late static binding, closures, optional garbage collection for cyclic references, new extensions (like ext/phar, ext/intl and ext/fileinfo), over 140 bug fixes and much more. As you can imagine, some old pieces will be broken."

Submission + - PHP 5.3 Released (binaryvibes.co.in)

Sudheer writes: "The PHP development team is proud to announce the immediate release of PHP 5.3.0. This release is a major improvement in the 5.X series, which includes a large number of new features and bug fixes.

Some of the key new features include: namespaces, late static binding, closures, optional garbage collection for cyclic references, new extensions (like ext/phar, ext/intl and ext/fileinfo), over 140 bug fixes and much more.

Have you started using these features in your applications?"

The Internet

Submission + - ACID 3 browser test finished (webstandards.org)

An anonymous reader writes: The ACID 3 was released today. From the homepage:

"Acid3 goes beyond the CSS tests implemented by Acid2 and tests a browser's DOM Scripting capability, as well as continuing to probe visual rendering of CSS, SVG and webfonts. Further information can be found on the Acid3 page, in the press release, or you can just go ahead and take the test."


Submission + - Rsync version 3 released, now with ACLS support

monkeybrainz writes: A useful tool for keeping our file servers in sync, rsync has released version 3 on March 1st 2008, now with some long awaited features for easier attribute preservation of files integrated with Active Directory servers.

From the rsync site:

Rsync version 3.0.0 is finally here! This is a feature release that also includes quite a few bug fixes.

The 3.0.0 version number is such a large bump up from 2.6.9 due to the addition of an incremental recursion scan (which helps a lot with large transfers) and the official arrival of several other new features, including ACL support, extended attribute support, filename character-set conversion, etc.

You can read all about the latest improvements and bug-fixes in the NEWS file. The pre-release version of the manpages are also available for both rsync and rsyncd.conf.

Some features available only through a patch are now included in the base release.

Do not underestimate the value of print statements for debugging.